Skip to content
Create an EKS cluster using terraform
HCL Shell
Branch: master
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
cluster
kubernetes
.gitignore
readme.adoc

readme.adoc

Terraform EKS Cluster Operations

This repo gives a quick getting started guide for deploying your Amazon EKS cluster using Hashicorp Terraform. It contains all the cluster logic in the ./cluster directory then you can use the same setup to deploy workloads as shown in the ./kubernetes directory.

ℹ️
Provisioning and Managing Kubernetes on AWS with HashiCorp Terraform Webinar
This repo was created for the Provisioning and Managing Kubernetes on AWS with HashiCorp Terraform Webinar in June of 2018. If you’d like to watch the recording click the Youtube video below.
0

Installation

We first need to make sure we have all the necessary components installed. This means installing:

The rest of this readme will walk through installing these components on macOS.

Install AWS IAM Authenticator

For authentication with an Amazon Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes you must use Amazon Identity and Access Management. To do so you must use an open source tool called the AWS IAM Authenticator, this was built in partnership with Heptio. After EKS was launched it was then migrated to ownership via SIG-AWS.

To install this, you can either use the vendored and compiled versions from the Github releases page or you can use go to install from source.

go get -u github.com/kubernetes-sigs/aws-iam-authenticator

Now that we have this installed we should make sure it is in our path, to check this we can run aws-iam-authenticator this should return the help documentation for the binary.

Once we have validated that it is installed we can move on to installing terraform.

Install Terraform

To install terraform on macOS, the easiest way I have found is to use the homebrew packaged version.

brew install terraform

This, like any homebrew package will install the terraform binaries into /usr/local/bin/ which should already be configured in your path.

With terraform installed we can then move on to installing the Kubernetes CLI, kubectl

Install kubectl

To install kubectl the easiest way again is to use homebrew on macOS.

brew install kubernetes-cli

After this has completed we should have access to kuebctl.

Clone This Repo

Now that we have all the requirements in place we can clone or fork this repo to get started.

git clone https://github.com/christopherhein/terraform-eks.git

Provisioning an EKS Cluster w/ Terraform

Before we can get started we need to make sure we have all the providers configured and we are in the right directly.

cd cluster/

Now we’re in our cluster directory we can then run init to load all the providers into the current session.

terraform init
Initializing provider plugins...

Terraform has been successfully initialized!

You may now begin working with Terraform. Try running "terraform plan" to see
any changes that are required for your infrastructure. All Terraform commands
should now work.

If you ever set or change modules or backend configuration for Terraform,
rerun this command to reinitialize your working directory. If you forget, other
commands will detect it and remind you to do so if necessary.

Now that we have terraform initialized and ready for use we can run plan which will show us what the config files will be creating. The output below has been truncated for breviety.

terraform apply
Refreshing Terraform state in-memory prior to plan...
The refreshed state will be used to calculate this plan, but will not be
persisted to local or remote state storage.

data.http.workstation-external-ip: Refreshing state...
data.aws_region.current: Refreshing state...
data.aws_availability_zones.available: Refreshing state...
data.aws_ami.eks-worker: Refreshing state...

------------------------------------------------------------------------

An execution plan has been generated and is shown below.
Resource actions are indicated with the following symbols:
  + create

Terraform will perform the following actions:

  + aws_autoscaling_group.demo
    ...
  + aws_eks_cluster.demo
    ...
  + aws_iam_instance_profile.demo-node
    ...
  + aws_iam_role.demo-cluster
    ...
  + aws_iam_role.demo-node
    ...
  + aws_iam_role_policy_attachment.demo-cluster-AmazonEKSClusterPolicy
    ...
  + aws_iam_role_policy_attachment.demo-cluster-AmazonEKSServicePolicy
    ...
  + aws_iam_role_policy_attachment.demo-node-AmazonEC2ContainerRegistryReadOnly
    ...
  + aws_iam_role_policy_attachment.demo-node-AmazonEKSWorkerNodePolicy
    ...
  + aws_iam_role_policy_attachment.demo-node-AmazonEKS_CNI_Policy
    ...
  + aws_internet_gateway.demo
    ...
  + aws_launch_configuration.demo
    ...
  + aws_route_table.demo
    ...
  + aws_route_table_association.demo[0]
    ...
  + aws_route_table_association.demo[1]
    ...
  + aws_security_group.demo-cluster
    ...
  + aws_security_group.demo-node
    ...
  + aws_security_group_rule.demo-cluster-ingress-node-https
    ...
  + aws_security_group_rule.demo-cluster-ingress-workstation-https
    ...
  + aws_security_group_rule.demo-node-ingress-cluster
    ...
  + aws_security_group_rule.demo-node-ingress-self
    ...
  + aws_subnet.demo[0]
    ...
  + aws_subnet.demo[1]
    ...
  + aws_vpc.demo
    ...


Plan: 24 to add, 0 to change, 0 to destroy.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note: You didn't specify an "-out" parameter to save this plan, so Terraform
can't guarantee that exactly these actions will be performed if
"terraform apply" is subsequently run.

With this output you can see all the resources that will be created on your behalf using terraform. If all this looks okay, we can then provision the cluster.

terraform apply

This will then go an provision the Security Groups, the VPC, the Subnets, the EKS cluster, and the worker nodes. It should take around 10 minutes to bring up the full cluster.

Before we can use the cluster we need to output both the kubeconfig and the aws-auth configmap which will allow our nodes to connect to the cluster.

terraform output kubeconfig > kubeconfig

This will output the kubeconfig file to your local directory, make sure you keep track of where this file lives, we’ll need it for the deployment of services.

Next we will use the same output subcommand to output the aws-auth configmap which will give the worker nodes the ability to connect to the cluster.

terraform output config-map-aws-auth > aws-auth.yaml

With this file and the kubeconfig file out you can then configure kubectl to use the kubeconfig file and apply the aws-auth configmap.

Connecting to your EKS Cluster

Now that we have all the files in-place we can then export out kubeconfig path and try using kubectl.

export KUBECONFIG=kubeconfig

Now we can check the connection to the Amazon EKS cluster but running kubectl.

kubectl get all
NAME                 TYPE        CLUSTER-IP   EXTERNAL-IP   PORT(S)   AGE
service/kubernetes   ClusterIP   10.100.0.1   <none>        443/TCP   10m

With this working we can then apply the aws-auth configmap.

kubectl apply -f aws-auth.yaml
configmap/aws-auth created

Now if we go an list nodes we should see that we have a full cluster up and running and ready to use!

kubectl get nodes

Deploy K8s Resources to EKS with Terraform

Now the we have the cluster in-place and ready to use we can then use terraform to describe some of our resources, this is analgous to using something like ksonnet or helm but with the benefit of having variables that we could use from the infrastructure instead of just what we’ve defined.

Before we get started I have placed this configurations in a separat directory kubernetes/ let’s cd into that directory.

cd ../kubernetes/

Now that we are in this directory we need to again make sure we init to install all the correct terraform providers.

terraform init
Initializing provider plugins...

Terraform has been successfully initialized!

You may now begin working with Terraform. Try running "terraform plan" to see
any changes that are required for your infrastructure. All Terraform commands
should now work.

If you ever set or change modules or backend configuration for Terraform,
rerun this command to reinitialize your working directory. If you forget, other
commands will detect it and remind you to do so if necessary.

With is done we can then run plan to see what will be applied to the cluster. In the main.tf file we defined a couple Kubernetes resources that will get deployed for demo purposes.

terraform plan
Refreshing Terraform state in-memory prior to plan...
The refreshed state will be used to calculate this plan, but will not be
persisted to local or remote state storage.

data.external.aws_iam_authenticator: Refreshing state...

------------------------------------------------------------------------

An execution plan has been generated and is shown below.
Resource actions are indicated with the following symbols:
  + create

Terraform will perform the following actions:

  + kubernetes_namespace.example
    ...
  + kubernetes_pod.nginx
    ...
  + kubernetes_service.nginx
    ...

Plan: 3 to add, 0 to change, 0 to destroy.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note: You didn't specify an "-out" parameter to save this plan, so Terraform
can't guarantee that exactly these actions will be performed if
"terraform apply" is subsequently run.

After doing a quick review of the plan we can see this creates a namespace, a pod, and a service. We can then apply this using terraform.

terraform apply

This will take a coupe seconds and you can then list all resources in the demo-service namespace again using kubectl.

kubectl get all --namespace demo-service

Conclusion

As you can see by this demo you can do full cluster operations for your Amazon EKS cluster using terraform. You have the ability to provision a highly available Kubernetes cluster backed by Amazon EKS and then deploy any number of Kubernetes resources into the cluster using terraform and the Kubernetes provider.

If you’d like to customize this repo for your own needs you can take a deeper dive into each file in the cluster/ and kubernetes/ directories which are fully commented to explain what each part is doing.

Questions, comments, please file Github issues. 🎉

You can’t perform that action at this time.