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A Cloud Foundry Service Broker for Vault Secure Storage
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README.md

Vault Service Broker

Vault is a secure credentials storage system from the fine people over at Hashicorp. If you work with Cloud Foundry and BOSH, you've probably already met the Vault BOSH release over at cloudfoundry-community.

Wouldn't it be awesome if you could use Vault from your Cloud Foundry applications?

Now you can!

Yes indeed, this here is a bona fide service broker for Vault, ready to be dropped into your Cloud Foundry and bound to your applications.

Getting Started

Before you can do anything, you need a running service broker somewhere. The easiest way to do this is to push the broker itself as a CF application:

cf push vault-broker -m 128M -k 256M --no-start
cf set-env vault-broker VAULT_ADDR  "${url}"
cf set-env vault-broker VAULT_TOKEN "${token}"
cf start vault-broker

Then, tell Cloud Foundry where the broker is...

cf create-service-broker vault ${user} ${pass} ${app_url}

(note that ${user} and ${pass} will both default to vault)

Now, assuming you want to create a service named "secrets", and attach it to an app named "password-manager":

cf create-service vault shared secrets
cf bind-service password-manager secrets
cf restage password-manager

All set!

How it Works

Each service provisioned results in a new policy, keyed to the instance ID. This policy grants full access to a subset of the Vault secret/ backend hierarchy.

When you bind the service to an application, the broker allocates a new access token for the application to use, and then grants it access to the services little corner of Vault. This allows multiple apps to share a space for secret credentials.

For example, if you create a service named 'secrets', and Cloud Foundry gives that service the GUID 1234, the broker will:

  1. Create a policy named 1234, that allows read / write / sudo access to the /secret/1234 path (and everything below).

(that's it)

When that service is bound to an application, Cloud Foundry assigns it a binding ID. Let's assume that that binding ID is ethel. The broker will:

  1. Create a new access token (assume its "flibbertygibbet")
  2. Associate "flibbertygibbet" with the 1234 policy
  3. Return the credentials to Cloud Foundry, which consist of:
    • token - The access token ("flibbertygibbet")
    • vault - The URL to the Vault (see $VAULT_ADVERTISE_ADDR, in the Configuration section)
    • vaults - The Vault URLs used for HA (see $VAULT_ADVERTISE_ADDR, in the Configuration section)
    • root - The root path under which to create secrets. In this example, that will be secret/1234
  4. Record the token in an accounting record, at secret/acct/1234/ethel.

When a service is unbound, (cf unbind-service) the associated token is revoked, hence the account records! See? It's all coming together!

When the service is deprovisioned (cf delete-service), the policy will be removed, and all secrets stored under that services part of the Vault hierarchy are summarily removed.

Configuration

The Vault Broker is configured entirely through environment variables:

  • $BROKER_GUID - GUID to use when registering the broker with Cloud Foundry. Defaults to f89443a4-ae71-49b0-b726-23ee9c98ae6d
  • $SERVICE_NAME - Name of the service, as shown in the marketplace. Defaults to vault
  • $SERVICE_DESC - A description of the service, also for the marketplace. Defaults to Vault Secure Storage
  • $SERVICE_TAGS - A set of tags for the service, each separated by a comma followed by a space. By default, no tags are configured.
  • $AUTH_USERNAME - The username for authenticating with Cloud Foundry. Defaults to vault.
  • $AUTH_PASSWORD - The password for authenticating with Cloud Foundry. Also defaults to vault.
  • $VAULT_ADDR - The address to use when accessing the Vault to set up new policies and manage provisioned services. This variable is required
  • $VAULT_ADVERTISE_ADDR - The address to hand out to bound applications, along with their credentials. This defaults to $VAULT_ADDR, but can be set separately if you need or want applications to access the Vault via DNS, or over a load balancer.
  • $VAULT_ADDRS - The addresses to use when accessing the Vault to set up new policies and manage provisioned services. This variable is required for HA. If the first address in the list is unavailable, the broker will failover to the other vaults in the list for token renewel/issuing/etc. (Note: the application bound to the broker must also be configured to fail over to the other addresses in the list)
  • $VAULT_ADVERTISE_ADDRS - The addresses to hand out to bound applications, along with their credentials. This defaults to $VAULT_ADDRS, but can be set separately if you need or want applications to access Vaults via DNS, or over load balancers.
  • $VAULT_TOKEN - The token that the service broker will use when interacting with the Vault. This variable is required, and you probably want to set it to a root token.
  • $VAULT_SKIP_VERIFY - Instructs the broker to ignore SSL/TLS certificate problems (self-signedness, domain mismatch, expiration, etc.). Set this at your own risk. Note that this will not be propagated to bound applications.
  • $VAULT_REFRESH_INTERVAL - How often, in minutes, should the broker renew tokens it has issued. Defaults to 30 (minutes).
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