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d3-component

A lightweight component abstraction for D3.js.

Features:

Examples:

Todos
Clock
Airport Clocks
example-viewer (Redux, ES6)
Fractal Pie Chart (ES6)

Using this component abstraction, you can easily encapsulate data-driven user interface components as conceptual "boxes-within-boxes", cleanly isolating concerns for various levels of your DOM tree. This component abstraction is similar in concept and functionality to React Stateless Functional Components. Everything a component needs to render itself and interact with application state gets passed down through the component tree at render time. Components don't store any local state; this is the main difference between d3-component and the Towards Reusable Charts pattern. No special treatment is given to events or event delegation, because the intended use is within a unidirectional data flow architecture like Redux.

Installing

If you use NPM, npm install d3-component. Otherwise, download the latest release. You can also load directly from unpkg.com as a standalone library. AMD, CommonJS, and vanilla environments are supported. In vanilla, a d3 global is exported:

<script src="https://unpkg.com/d3@4"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/d3-component@3"></script>
<script>
  var myComponent = d3.component("div");
</script>

API Reference

Note: There was a recent major version release, and along with it there were substantial API Changes.

In summary, the API looks like this:

var myComponent = d3.component("div", "some-class")
  .create((selection, d, i) => { ... }) // Invoked for entering component instances.
  .render((selection, d, i) => { ... }) // Invoked for entering AND updating component instances.
  .destroy((selection, d, i) => { ... }); // Invoked for exiting instances, may return a transition.

// To invoke the component,
d3.select("body") // create a selection with a single element,
  .call(myComponent, "Hello d3-component!"); // then use selection.call().

To see the full API in action, check out this "Hello d3-component" example.

# component(tagName[, className]))

Creates a new component generator that manages and renders into DOM elements of the specified tagName.

The optional parameter className determines the value of the class attribute on the DOM elements managed.

# component.create(function(selection, d, i))

Sets the create function of this component generator, which will be invoked whenever a new component instance is created, being passed a selection containing the current DOM element, the current datum (d), and the index of the current datum (i).

# component.render(function(selection, d, i))

Sets the render function of this component generator. This function will be invoked for each component instance during rendering, being passed a selection containing the current DOM element, the current datum (d), and the index of the current datum (i).

# component.destroy(function(selection, d, i))

Sets the destroy function of this component generator, which will be invoked whenever a component instance is destroyed, being passed a selection containing the current DOM element, the current datum (d), and the index of the current datum (i).

When a component instance gets destroyed, the destroy function of all its children is also invoked (recursively), so you can be sure that this function will be invoked before the compoent instance is removed from the DOM.

The destroy function may optionally return a transition, which will defer DOM element removal until after the transition is finished (but only if the parent component instance is not destroyed). Deeply nested component instances may have their DOM nodes removed before the transition completes, so it's best not to depend on the DOM node existing after the transition completes.

# component.key(function)

Sets the key function used in the internal data join when managing DOM elements for component instances. Specifying a key function is optional (the array index is used as the key by default), but will make re-rendering more efficient in cases where data arrays get reordered or spliced over time.

# component(selection[,data[,context]])

Renders the component to the given selection, a D3 selection containing a single DOM element. A raw DOM element may also be passed in as the selection argument. Returns a D3 selection containing the merged Enter and Update selections for component instances.

  • If data is specified and is an array, one component instance will be rendered for each element of the array, and the render function will receive a single element of the data array as its d argument.
    • Useful case: If data is specified as an empty array [], all previously rendered component instances will be removed.
  • If data is specified and is not an array, exactly one component instance will be rendered, and the render function will receive the data value as its d argument.
  • If data is not specified, exactly one component instance will be rendered, and the render function will receive undefined as its d argument.

In summary, components can be rendered using the following signatures:

  • selection.call(myComponent, dataObject) → One instance, render function d will be dataObject.
  • selection.call(myComponent, dataArray)dataArray.length instances, render function d will be dataArray[i]
  • selection.call(myComponent) → One instance, render function d will be undefined.

If a context object is specified, each data element in the data array will be shallow merged into a new object whose prototype is the context object, and the resulting array will be used in place of the data array. This is useful for passing down callback functions through your component tree. To clarify, the following two invocations are equivalent:

var context = {
  onClick: function (){ console.log("Clicked!");
};
selection.call(myComponent, dataArray.map(function (d){
  return Object.assign(Object.create(context), d);
}));
var context = {
  onClick: function (){ console.log("Clicked!");
};
selection.call(myComponent, dataArray, context);