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Workload model language

Vasily Tarasov edited this page May 13, 2017 · 40 revisions

This page contains the complete and rather dry definition of Filebench Workload Model Language (WML). If you are looking for a gentle introduction to WML proceed to the Writing workload models page.

WML contains nearly XXX words which can be grouped in four main categories:

Commands define entities and control the overall run. There are four main entities in Filebench: 1) processes, 2) threads, 3) flowops (operations), and 4) variables. Every process consists of one or multiple threads which execute one or multiple flowops in a loop. Commands, entities, and flowops can be passed parameters using attributes.

Short alpabetical index of commands

create files | debug | define file | define fileset | define process | echo | enable | eventgen | list | psrun | quit | run | set | set mode | sleep | system | version |

Short Alpabetical Index of Flowops

read | readwholefile | write | writewholefile | appendfile | appendfilerand |

createfile | openfile | closefile | statfile | deletefile | fsync | fsyncset |

MakeDir | RemoveDir | ListDir |

aiowrite | aiowait |

block | wakeup | semblock | sempost |

eventlimit | delay | hog | finishonbytes | finishoncount | opslimit | iopslimit | bwlimit |


Commands

create files

Creates all previously defined files and filesets. This would be automatically done by run or psrun commands but sometimes it is handy to separate file creation stage. E.g., when Filebench is used only to generate a file system tree or when one wants to execute system commands after file creation (e.g., drop file system specific caches).

Syntax

create files


echo

The echo command prints the text to the standard output. The text should be enclosed in quotes and can contain variables.

Syntax:

echo <message>

Example:

echo "Number of files in workload is $files"


enable

Enables additional Filebench features that are disabled by default. Currently lathist and multi are the features that can be enabled. lathist tells Filebench to collect per-flowop latency histograms, while multi enables enables multinode mode. For multinode mode one has to specify master's hostname and client's hostname. Multinode feature is under development.

Syntax

enable lathist enable multi master=<hostname>,client=<clientname>

Example

enable lathist enable multi master="master.domain.org",client="slave.domain.org"


eventgen

The eventgen command controls the properties of Filebench internal event generator. The rate attribute of this command sets the number of events generated per second. Events are then used by eventlimit, iopslimit, opslimit, and bwlimit flowops. If there are no events available at the time of a flowop execution then the flowop blocks until new events are posted. There is one general pool of events used by all flowops in all threads.

Syntax:

eventgen [rate = <events_per_second>]

Example:

eventgen rate = 100


run

Starts Filebench run. The command causes Filebench to create all defined filesets and fork defined processes and threads. Threads are then started to execute corresponding flowops. When the run completes (either because the time is over or for other reasons), Filebench prints the statistics of the run, e.g., ops/sec.

This command is the last that Filebench reads from the workload file. The reminder of the file is ignored.

Takes runtime as an arument. If runtime is not specified, default runtime of 60 seconds is used.

Syntax

run [<runtime>]

Example

run 300


set

XXX: The text below about setting variable values is outdated. In future, we will use custom variables insted. Furthermore, it is still to decide if we

Set searches for the varname supplied as the first argument and if not found creates a new var of that name. It then supplies the integer, string, or $varname value on the rest of the line to it.

A workload model can make use of variables, known as ''vars'' from within the model. Vars can be user defined, Filebench internally defined items. All vars are identified by a string preceded by a dollar sign "$". User defined vars can be created and assigned either integer or string values using the ''set'' command. Internal vars can be accessed by specifying the appropriate name enclosed in braces.

$user_defined_varname

${stats | rate | date |scriptname | hostname}

Variables can be used to set attributes for files, filesets, processes, threads, and flowops. Each var can hold either a boolean, 64 bit unsigned integer, double, or character string, or be empty.

Regular vars

Regular, user defined vars can be set to a value with a ''set'' command.

set $<user_defined_varname> = [true | false | | | ]

Random vars

Random variables are user defined entities that are defined with a random distribution which is used to pick a random value to return with each use. The are created with a ''define randvar'' command, and may have individual parameters set with ''set'' commands. The are used just like regular variables, but return a different value each time they are accessed. They are particularly useful with flowops.

define randvar name = $<user_defined_varname>, [type=[uniform | gamma | table]] [, seed=] [, mean=] [, gamma=] [, min=] [, round=] [, randsrc=[urandom | rand48] [, randtable={{<%>,,}, ...}

set $<user_defined_varname>. =

set $<varname> = [ true | false | <integer> | <double> | "<string>" | $<othervarname>

set $<random varname>.type = [ uniform | gamma | tabular ]

set $<random varname>.randsrc = [ urandom | rand48 ]

set $<random varname>.[ gamma | mean | min | round | seed ] = <value>

set $<random varname>.randtable = {{ <%>, <min value>, <max value>}, ...}

set $<custom varname> = cvar(type="cvar-type",paramters=mean)

Custom vars

XXX


set mode

The set mode command is used to put Filebench into various special modes of operation. It is followed by a subcommand, of which quit is the only one presently defined. The default is quit timeout, which ends the run when the runtime specified in a run command has expired or when a positively evaluated finishon* flowop is encountered.

If the workload is expected to end when it runs out of resources, such as files to delete, then use either quit alldone to finish the run once all the threads have quit because of resource exhaustion, or quit firstdone, to quit as soon as the first thread detects resource exhaustion.

Syntax

set mode quit [ timeout | alldone | firstdone ]

Example

set mode quit alldone


system

Executes quoted UNIX command, waits for the command to finish, and prints its output to the screen.

Syntax

system "<unixcommand>"

Example

system "echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop/caches" system "ls $dir"


define fileset

Information about a group of related files (e.g., all html files accessed by a Web-server) is contained in a fileset entity. Fileset entities are specified using the define fileset command. The define fileset command must provide a name for the fileset and the path to the directory where the files will reside. In addition, several optional fileset attributes are accepted.

XXX: Describe that filebench maintains internal file system tree. For every file (whether it exists or not) there is an entry in filebench. Entry will be marked exists or not, what the file size is. This will help to explain how reuse and trustree.

Attributes

  • name =

    Mandatory. The name of a fileset. Fileset names are later used by flowops to refer to specific filesets.

  • path = Mandatory. Path to the directory where the files are created. The path directive is used in the fileset clause to set the prefix path for the dataset. It is often set at the head of the script or passed in as a parameter:

  • entries =

    Optional. The number of files in a fileset. This is the maximum number of files that can ever be created in the fileset. Not all files in the fileset are created from the very beginning of the Filebench run. See prealloc attribute to control the ratio of initially created files. Default value is 1,024. Filesets are typically used to create a group of files, and the entries attribute is used to set the number of such files. If the entries attribute is not specified, only one file will be created.

  • filesize = size =

    Optional. The size of every file in a fileset. Default is 1KiB. The filesize attribute of a file or fileset specifies the size of file(s) that will be created. If a fileset and filegamma has been specified as other than 0, the filesize attribute will actually specify the mean file size, with the actual size of each file based on the gamma distribution with alpha based on the filegamma attribute. The size attribute is used with the define file and define fileset commands. For define file it sets the size of the file. For define fileset, it sets the mean size of the files, with the actual size set by the gamma random distribution specified for the fileset.

  • prealloc =

    prealloc

    Optional. Percent of the files in a fileset to preallocate before the actual Filebench workload starts. Default value, if prealloc is not specified, is 0. If prealloc is specified without a number then the value is 100. The files defined by the file or fileset entities can either exist as potential files or actual ones. As a potential one, information about them is kept by the file or fileset entity, but the do not occupy disk space or exist in a directory. If they do not exist they can be created later with the creatfile flowop. When used with a file, the prealloc attribute specifies that the file should actually exist. When used with a fileset, it specifies the percentage of files that should actually exist, with a default value of 100%.

  • reuse

    Optional. Reuse the fileset if it exists in the file system. If a file corresponding to a fileset entry marked as existing exists in a file sytem, then Filebench will reuse the file. Depending on the trusttree attribute, such file will or will not be adjusted to the appropriate size. Depending on the trusttree attribute,zd if file does not exist in a filesystem, it will or will not be created.

    If reuse is not set and a fileset exists, it will be completely removed before being recreated from scratch.

    Optional. Whether to reuse the file or recreate it if it already exists. the reuse attribute allows the reuse of existing files or filesets which have the same name as the specified file or fileset. if the file is too large it will be truncated, and if it is too small it will be rewritten. a fileset with a matching name will also be reused, with individual files adjusted to match their new specified sizes.

  • trusttree

    Optional. Whether to completely trust the existing fileset. Implies reuse attribute and in addition omits file existance and size checks.

  • paralloc

    Optional. Allocate files on a file system in parallels using 32 threads. By default, single thread is used. Use of this attribute can speed up the pre allocation of files, by creating and writing them in parallel. However, it only works with files at present, not filesets.

  • readonly

    Optional. Open all files with O_RDONLY. Applies to newly created files as well. By default O_RDWR flag is used.

  • writeonly

    Optional. Open all files with O_WRONLY. Applies to newly created files as well. By default O_RDWR flag is used.

  • dirwidth

    Optional. How many files to create per directory. The dirwidth attribute of a fileset specifies the average number of entries in each directory created as part of the fileset. Filebench also uses this in combination with the total number of files in the fileset to calculate the required mean depth of the fileset's directory tree. The default is a dirwidth of 0, which specifies a single level directory containing all the files of the fileset. Default value is XXX.

  • dirgamma

    Optional. Gamma for gamma distribution for files in dirwidth. The dirgamma attribute of a fileset specifies the alpha parameter of the gamma distribution which will be used to decide whether a given subdirectory contains files or additional subdirectories. If the dirgamma attribute is not specified, it defaults to 1500. The value can range from 100 to 10000, and the corresponds to a gamma of 0.1 to 10.

  • didepthrv

    Optional. XXX. Default value is XXX.

  • leafdirs

    Optional. XXX. Default value is XXX.

Syntax

define fileset name=<name>,path=<pathname>[,entries=<files>][,filesize=<filesize>][,dirwidth=<width>][,dirgamma=<dirgamma>][,dirdepthrv=<$rv>][,leafdirs=<leafdirs][,prealloc | prealloc = <percent>],[,writeonly][,readonly][,paralloc][,reuse][,trusttree]

Examples

define fileset name="myfilesetF",path="/tmp"

define fileset name="myfilesetF",path="/tmp",entries=10000,filesize=16384,prealloc=80

define fileset name="myfilesetF",path="/tmp",entries=1000,filesize=16384,dirwidth=1000,prealloc


define file

** XXX: Should we remove this? I thought about it and then found that origina? *

Defines a single file. Mandatory attributes of the file are name, path (directory where the file will reside), and size. Optional attributes are prealloc (create and fill the file with data), paralloc (allocate in parallel with other files), and reuse (reuse file if exists).

Attributes

  • name Mandatory. The name of the file. During the definition of processes file names are used in flowops to refer to a specific files or filesets.

  • path Mandatory. Path to the directory where the file is created. The path directive is used in the fileset clause to set the prefix path for the dataset. It is often set at the head of the script or passed in as a parameter:

  • size Optional. The size of files in the fileset. Dedault is 1KiB (1,024B). The size attribute is used with the define file and define fileset commands. For define file it sets the size of the file. For define fileset, it sets the mean size of the files, with the actual size set by the gamma random distribution specified for the fileset.

  • prealloc Optional. Prealloc or not.

  • reuse Optional. Whether to reuse the file or recreate it if it already exists. the reuse attribute allows the reuse of existing files or filesets which have the same name as the specified file or fileset. if the file is too large it will be truncated, and if it is too small it will be rewritten. a fileset with a matching name will also be reused, with individual files adjusted to match their new specified sizes.

  • trusttree Optional. Trust that file exist.

  • paralloc Optional. Allocate in parallel with other defined files and filesets.

  • readonly Optional. Open file with O_RDONLY flag.

  • writeonly Optional. Open file with O_WRONLY flag.

Syntax

define file name=<name>,path=<pathname>,size=<size>[,paralloc][,prealloc][,reuse][,trusttree][,readonly][,writeonly]

Example

define file name=myfile,path=/tmp,size=100mb,prealloc

define file name=myfile,path=/tmp,size=100mb,reuse,readonly


define process

A Filebench process represents and operating system process and contains one or more threads. In turn, each Filebench thread represents an operating system thread of control and contains a collection of flowops. The following example illustrates how to specify a process, thread and collection of flowops.

Process entities correspond to operating system processes. The define process command is used to instantiate a given process entity, which may spawn one or multiple, identical copies of a process. Each process consists of one or more threads. A thread, in turn, consists of a set of flowops (operations) that define what should a thread do.

Threads can also have a region of memory allocated which certain flowops will then use as buffer space for I/O. This region is created by setting a value for the memsize attribute. If the ''useism'' attribute is set then IPC shared memory will be used, otherwise thread local memory will be used.

When process and threads are specified using the define command, the instances attribute may be used so request multiple copies of the defined process or threads. If used with the process definition, the requested number of operating system processes will be created, each with its own copy of the threads and flowops included in the definition. Similarly, if used with a thread definition, the requested number of threads will be created for each operating system process, each with its own copy of the specified flowops. If the instance flowop is not included, then a single instance of the process or thread is created.

Basic process definition:

thread name=<thread_name>,memsize=<thread_memory> { ... flowops

  ...

} }```

Example in advance

define process name=filewriter,instances=1 { thread name=filewriterthread,memsize=10m,instances=1 { flowop appendfile name=write-file, filesetname=bigfileset, iosize=1m, fd=1, iters=20 flowop closefile name=close,fd=1 flowop finishoncount name=finish,value=1 } }


**Process attributes**

* `name = `
  Mandatory. Name of the process.

* `instances`
  Optional. How many instances of this process to spawn.
  Default is 1.
  the requested number
  of operating system processes will be created, each with its own copy of the
  threads and flowops included in the definition.
  If
  the `instance` flowop is not included, then a single instance of the
  process is created.

* nice
  Optional. Increase nice. Default is not to change the nice.
  The `nice` attribute allows you to lower the priority of the process (or set of
  processes if multiple instances are requested) below that of what it otherwise
  would be. Note that all processes are automatically set to a lower priority
  than the master process controlling the run. But if you want a particular
  process to be at a lower priority than the others, specify `nice` with some
  integer value to accomplish this.

**Thread attributes**

* `name = `
  Mandatory. Name of the process.

* `memsize = `
  Mandatory. Amount of memory this thread will allocate
  in the beginning. The thread will zero-out this region
  before the run and will allocate buffers for read and write
  flowops from this region. Default is XXXmb.
  This parameter in the thread clause sets the size
  of the private memory segment of the thread.

* `instances = `
  Optional. How many instances of this process to spawn.
  Default is 1.
  requested number of threads will be created for each
  operating system process, each with its own copy of the specified flowops. If
  the `instance` flowop is not included, then a single instance of the
  thread is created.

* `useism`
  Optional. Use shared memory instead of per-thread memory
  for all threads.
  The `useism` attribute tells the thread to use shared memory for its thread memory region.

**Syntax**

> ``` define process name=<process name>[,instances=<number of instances>][,nice=<additional niceness>][,useism]
{
   thread name =<thread name>,memsize=<memory size>[,instances=<number of instances>][,nice=<additional niceness>] {
   }
 }

list

Depending on the argument, the list command either prints information about all defined files or flowops.

Syntax

list fileset|flowop

  • Examples *

list fileset

list flowop


debug

Sets the verbosity of debugging level. Allowed values are from 0 to 10. The higher the value the more debugging information is printed. By default this is set to 2 at the startup.

Syntax

debug <debug_level>

Example

debug 4


quit

Ends the Filebench execution. Can be used to terminate WML parsing in the middle of a WML script.

Syntax

quit


sleep

Causes Filebench to sleep for the number of seconds supplied by the argument. Notice, this is not a flowop executed by workers but a command that Filebench's master process executes.

Syntax

sleep

Example

sleep 10


version

Prints Filebench version.

Syntax

version

Flowops

The flowop clause determines what a thread actually does. The operations and their syntax is covered in this section. The flowop actions can be divided up into Basic I/O, Asynchronous I/O, Synchronization constructs and Misc other operations.

Some of the flowop syntax is common to all flowops. They are defined with the flowop keyword within a thread definition. Immediately following the flowop keyword is the name of the particular operation that is to be performed. Following that are a list of attributes, of which the name and iters attributes are common to all flowops. The name attribute is mandatory and provides the particular instance of the flowop with a name by which it can be referenced elsewhere and in the results. The name must be globally unique. The iters attribute is optional, but if specified allows the action specified by the flowop to happen multiple times each time the flowop is invoked.


File I/O Flowops

Reading and writing to files and filesets. On opening or creating a file, a file descriptor number can be specified, which will save the returned file descriptor for later use. Then operations on the already open file can reference it by its file descriptor number. Other read and write flowops will implicitly open a file for use if the filename or fileset name is provided without a file descriptor number. For filesets, specific files can be accessed by passing a file index number to the flowop, which can be obtained from a random variable to provide random file accesses. Otherwise files will be accessed round robin style.

read

Emulate posix read or pread. The flowop must include either filesetname or filename attribute. If a filesetname attribute is supplied, the read operation will be done to a file from the fileset. Otherwise it will read the file specified by the filename attribute. If a fileset is specified along with an fd attribute, than the referenced file will be read. Otherwise the default fd=0 will be used or, if the opennext attribute is set, the flowop will pick the next file in sequence to read. [XXX: this requires more explanation]. If the file is not already open, this flowop will open it (using, if supplied, the directio and dsync attributes as described for the openfile flowop).

The actual read is done to a random offset in the threadflow's thread memory, with a size set by the iosize attribute and at a random disk offset within the working set size if the random attribute is set, or at the next sequential location. The workingset attribute specifies the the offset range for use in choosing the random disk offset [XXX: from the beginning or end?]

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name Names must be globally unique within an entity type. Thus if you have two processes, each of which has a read type flowop, you must make sure that both read flowops have unique names, such as name=read1 name=read2.

  • filesetname = filename = One of this attributes is mandatory. The filename attribute specifies the name of a file. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular file to access. The filesetname attribute specifies the name of a fileset. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular fileset to access.

  • iosize = Mandatory? The iosize attribute is used to specify the size of the I/O operatio. It defaults to XXX.

  • directio Specifies opening the file in direct, rather than buffered, I/O mode. Essentially bypasses filesystem caches, so each I/O request results in an actual I/O to the attached device. Needs to be specified with the flowop that opens the file, which is often openfile, but can be one of the other I/O flowops.

  • dsync Specifies the use of synchronous writes, which do not complete until the attached device has written the data to non volatile storage. Not only does this disable filesystem write back caching, it also is supposed to prevent device (such as an attached disk drive) from doing write back caching. This attribute needs to be specified with all flowops that might open the file, as the file must be opened as a synchronous file for this attribute to be effective. While openfile is often used for that purpose, any of the other flowops will open a file if it is not already open, so they may need the attribute defined as well.

  • fd = The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

  • opennext The opennext attribute is used with I/O flowops to indicate that the flowop should open a different file with each invocation. XXX there is something funky with this in the code.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

  • random Specify that a random location within the file be picked for access. Without this attribute, the next sequential file blocks will be read or written.

  • workingset = The workingset attribute is used by some I/O flowops to specify a maximum byte range of the file that will actually be read from or written to. This can be less than the actual file size, or for writes may also be larger than the current size, where it serves to set the maximum size the file can grow to.

Syntax

flowop read name=<name>,filesetname|filename=<fname>,iosize=<size>[,directio][,dsync][,iters=<count>][,random][,opennext][,workingset=<size>][,fd=<file-desc-number>][,index=<file-index>]

readwholefile

Emulate a read of a whole file. The file from the supplied fileset filesetname that is referenced by the fd attribute (if it is supplied) or by the default fd=0. If fil descriptor (0 or not) is not opened, readwholefile will open the file before reading it. The readwholefile flowop then reads from the beginning of the file to the end, using zero or more iosize reads, followed by a read of whatever remaining, less than iosize amount, needs to be read. If iosize is not defined or set to zero, then the file will be read in one read of filesize bytes (as defined in fileset).

** Attributes **

  • name Name of the flowop

  • fd = The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

  • opennext The opennext attribute is used with I/O flowops to indicate that the flowop should open a different file with each invocation. XXX there is something funky with this in the code.

  • filesetname = filename = One of this attributes is mandatory. The filename attribute specifies the name of a file. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular file to access. The filesetname attribute specifies the name of a fileset. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular fileset to access.

  • iosize = Mandatory? The iosize attribute is used to specify the size of the I/O operatio. It defaults to XXX.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

XXX

** Syntax**

flowop readwholefile name=,filesetname=,iosize=,[,iters=][,fd=] [,index=]

write

Emulate a write to a file. The size of the write is specified by the iosize attribute. If a fileset is specified, it writes to a file from the fileset referenced by the fd attribute, if it is supplied, to the default fd=0 file, or to the next file of the sequence if the opennext attribute is set. [XXX: what sequnce?]. If a filename attribute is supplied instead, it will write to the named file. If the file is not already open, this flowop will open it, using, if provided, the directio and dsync attributes as described for the openfile flowop. The flowop's workingset attribute will be used to set the maximum file size if it is non-zero, otherwise the whole file size will be used. The actual write is done from a random offset in the threadflow's thread memory, with a size set by the iosize attribute and at a random disk offset within the working set size if the random attribute is set, or at the next sequential location.

Attributes

  • name =

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

  • directio Specifies opening the file in direct, rather than buffered, I/O mode. Essentially bypasses filesystem caches, so each I/O request results in an actual I/O to the attached device. Needs to be specified with the flowop that opens the file, which is often openfile, but can be one of the other I/O flowops.

  • dsync Specifies the use of synchronous writes, which do not complete until the attached device has written the data to non volatile storage. Not only does this disable filesystem write back caching, it also is supposed to prevent device (such as an attached disk drive) from doing write back caching. This attribute needs to be specified with all flowops that might open the file, as the file must be opened as a synchronous file for this attribute to be effective. While openfile is often used for that purpose, any of the other flowops will open a file if it is not already open, so they may need the attribute defined as well.

  • fd = The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

  • opennext The opennext attribute is used with I/O flowops to indicate that the flowop should open a different file with each invocation. XXX there is something funky with this in the code.

  • filesetname = filename = One of this attributes is mandatory. The filename attribute specifies the name of a file. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular file to access. The filesetname attribute specifies the name of a fileset. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular fileset to access.

  • iosize = Mandatory? The iosize attribute is used to specify the size of the I/O operatio. It defaults to XXX.

  • random Specify that a random location within the file be picked for access. Without this attribute, the next sequential file blocks will be read or written.

  • workingset = The workingset attribute is used by some I/O flowops to specify a maximum byte range of the file that will actually be read from or written to. This can be less than the actual file size, or for writes may also be larger than the current size, where it serves to set the maximum size the file can grow to.

Syntax

flowop write name=,filesetname|filename=,iosize=[,directio][,dsync][,iters=][,random][,opennext][,workingset=][,fd=][,index=]

writewholefile

Emulates a write of a whole file. The size of the file is taken from a fileset identified by the srcfd attribute, while the file used for the write is identified by the fd attribute. Both default to 0. [XXX: if fd= is set but srcfd is notset, shouldn't we set srcfd=fd?]. Does multiple writes of iosize length until full file has been written. If iosize is not defined or set to zero, then a single write of the size of the source file is done.

Attributes

  • name Mandatory. XXX

  • dsync Specifies the use of synchronous writes, which do not complete until the attached device has written the data to non volatile storage. Not only does this disable filesystem write back caching, it also is supposed to prevent device (such as an attached disk drive) from doing write back caching. This attribute needs to be specified with all flowops that might open the file, as the file must be opened as a synchronous file for this attribute to be effective. While openfile is often used for that purpose, any of the other flowops will open a file if it is not already open, so they may need the attribute defined as well.

  • fd = The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

  • srcfd = The srcfd attribute specifies the file descriptor to use as a source of filesize information when invoking the writewholefile flowop. In the example below the code is emulating a copy file operation, where the file is read in then written out to a new file, which, of course, would end up with the same size as the original.

  • filesetname = filename = One of this attributes is mandatory. The filename attribute specifies the name of a file. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular file to access. The filesetname attribute specifies the name of a fileset. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular fileset to access.

  • iosize = Mandatory? The iosize attribute is used to specify the size of the I/O operatio. It defaults to XXX.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

Syntax

flowop writewholefile name=,filesetname=,iosize=[,dsync][,iters=][,srfd=][,fd=][,index=]

appendfile

Emulate a fixed size append to a file. Will append data to a file chosen from a fileset if one is specified with the filesetname attribute, or if the fd attribute is non zero and the attribute's file associated with the file descriptor is open. If a fileset is specified but the referenced file is not open, appendfile will open it. If no fileset or non-zero fd attribute is specified, then a file named by the ''filename'' attribute will be used. If no appropriate file can be found, Filebench will terminate. While the workingset attribute is accepted, it is not currently used. Thus the repeated invocation on the flowop for a given file will cause the file to grow arbitrarily large. The size of each append is set by the iosize attribute.

Attribute

  • name = Mandatory. XX

  • directio Specifies opening the file in direct, rather than buffered, I/O mode. Essentially bypasses filesystem caches, so each I/O request results in an actual I/O to the attached device. Needs to be specified with the flowop that opens the file, which is often openfile, but can be one of the other I/O flowops.

  • dsync Specifies the use of synchronous writes, which do not complete until the attached device has written the data to non volatile storage. Not only does this disable filesystem write back caching, it also is supposed to prevent device (such as an attached disk drive) from doing write back caching. This attribute needs to be specified with all flowops that might open the file, as the file must be opened as a synchronous file for this attribute to be effective. While openfile is often used for that purpose, any of the other flowops will open a file if it is not already open, so they may need the attribute defined as well.

  • fd = The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

  • filesetname = filename = One of this attributes is mandatory. The filename attribute specifies the name of a file. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular file to access. The filesetname attribute specifies the name of a fileset. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular fileset to access.

  • iosize = Mandatory? The iosize attribute is used to specify the size of the I/O operatio. It defaults to XXX.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

  • workingset = The workingset attribute is used by some I/O flowops to specify a maximum byte range of the file that will actually be read from or written to. This can be less than the actual file size, or for writes may also be larger than the current size, where it serves to set the maximum size the file can grow to.

Syntax

flowop appendfile name=, filename|fileset=, iosize=\ [,dsync] [,iters=] [,workingset=] [,fd=][,index=]

appendfilerand

XXX: Should we remove it and say that a random variable should be used?

Emulate a random size append to a file. Will append data to a file chosen from a fileset if one is specified with the fileset attribute, or if the fd attribute is non zero and the attribute's file associated with the file descriptor is open. If a fileset is specified but the referenced file is not open, appendfile will open it. If no filesetname or non-zero fd attribute is specified, then a file named by the filename attribute will be used. If no appropriate file can be found, Filebench will terminate. Repeated invocation on the flowop for a given file will cause the file to grow arbitrarily large. A write to the current end of the file with a random transfer size of at most ''iosize'' bytes is done.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory.

  • directio Specifies opening the file in direct, rather than buffered, I/O mode. Essentially bypasses filesystem caches, so each I/O request results in an actual I/O to the attached device. Needs to be specified with the flowop that opens the file, which is often openfile, but can be one of the other I/O flowops.

  • dsync Specifies the use of synchronous writes, which do not complete until the attached device has written the data to non volatile storage. Not only does this disable filesystem write back caching, it also is supposed to prevent device (such as an attached disk drive) from doing write back caching. This attribute needs to be specified with all flowops that might open the file, as the file must be opened as a synchronous file for this attribute to be effective. While openfile is often used for that purpose, any of the other flowops will open a file if it is not already open, so they may need the attribute defined as well.

  • fd = The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

  • filesetname = filename = One of this attributes is mandatory. The filename attribute specifies the name of a file. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular file to access. The filesetname attribute specifies the name of a fileset. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular fileset to access.

  • iosize = Mandatory? The iosize attribute is used to specify the maximum size of the I/O operation. It defaults to XXX.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

Syntax

flowop appendfilerand name=, filename|filesetname=, iosize=\ [,dsync] [,iters=] [,workingset=] [,fd=] [,index=]


File Metadata Flowops

Opening, closing and stating files and filesets. On opening or creating a file, a file descriptor number can be specified. Then operations on the already open file can reference it by its file descriptor number. For filesets, specific files can be opened or created by passing a file index number to the flowop, which can be obtained from a random variable to provide random file accesses. Otherwise files will be accessed round robin style.

createfile

Emulates create of a file. Associates createfile's fd attribute, if supplied, with the created file's operating system specific file descriptor so it can be referenced by other file operations. Selects a file entry from the fileset which file does not currently exist for the file create operation. Then performs an open operation on the file with the O_CREATE flag set to create the file. The file can be created (i.e., opened) with direct I/O by including the directio attribute and writes can be forced to behave as defined by synchronized I/O data integrity constraints by setting the dsync attribute.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop.

  • directio Specifies opening the file in direct, rather than buffered, I/O mode. Essentially bypasses filesystem caches, so each I/O request results in an actual I/O to the attached device. Needs to be specified with the flowop that opens the file, which is often openfile, but can be one of the other I/O flowops.

  • dsync Specifies the use of synchronous writes, which do not complete until the attached device has written the data to non volatile storage. Not only does this disable filesystem write back caching, it also is supposed to prevent device (such as an attached disk drive) from doing write back caching. This attribute needs to be specified with all flowops that might open the file, as the file must be opened as a synchronous file for this attribute to be effective. While openfile is often used for that purpose, any of the other flowops will open a file if it is not already open, so they may need the attribute defined as well.

  • fd = The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

  • filesetname = filename = One of this attributes is mandatory. The filename attribute specifies the name of a file. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular file to access. The filesetname attribute specifies the name of a fileset. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular fileset to access.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked. XXX: but what happens with fd in the followin iterations?

Syntax

flowop createfile name=,filesetname=[,fd=][,directio][,dsync][,index=]

Examples

flowop createfile name=mycreatefile,filesetname=myfileset

openfile

Emulates a file open operation. Associates openfile's fd attribute, if supplied, with the opened file's operating system specific file descriptor so it can be referenced by other file operations. However, openfile will fail if the supplied fd attribute is already associated with an open file. Selects a file entry from the fileset whose file exists for the file open operation. Then performs a file open operation on the filesetentry's associated file. The file can be opened with direct I/O by including the directio attribute and writes can be forced to behave as defined by synchronized I/O data integrity constraints by setting the dsync attribute.

Atributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop. Must be unique.

  • directio Specifies opening the file in direct, rather than buffered, I/O mode. Essentially bypasses filesystem caches, so each I/O request results in an actual I/O to the attached device. Needs to be specified with the flowop that opens the file, which is often openfile, but can be one of the other I/O flowops.

  • dsync Specifies the use of synchronous writes, which do not complete until the attached device has written the data to non volatile storage. Not only does this disable filesystem write back caching, it also is supposed to prevent device (such as an attached disk drive) from doing write back caching. This attribute needs to be specified with all flowops that might open the file, as the file must be opened as a synchronous file for this attribute to be effective. While openfile is often used for that purpose, any of the other flowops will open a file if it is not already open, so they may need the attribute defined as well.

  • fd = The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

  • filesetname = filename = One of this attributes is mandatory. The filename attribute specifies the name of a file. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular file to access. The filesetname attribute specifies the name of a fileset. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular fileset to access.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked. XXX: but what happens with fd in the followin iterations?

Syntax

flowop openfile name=,filesetname=[,fd=][,directio][,dsync][,index=]

closefile

Emulate close of a file. The file referenced by the fd attribute (if it is supplied) or by default fd=0, must be open. Simply does a close operation on the referenced file.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop. XXX

  • fd = The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked. XXX: but what happens with fd in the followin iterations?

Syntax

flowop closefile name= [,fd=]

fsync

Emulates fsync of a file. The file referenced by the fd attribute (if it is supplied) or by default fd=0, must be open.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop. XXX

  • fd = The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked. XXX: but what happens with fd in the followin iterations?

Syntax

flowop fsync name=[,fd=]

fsyncset

Emulate fsync of an entire fileset. Does an `fsync`` operation on every open (XX) file of the fileset.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop. XXX

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

Syntax

flowop fsyncset name=,fileset=

statfile

Emulates stat of a file. Picks an arbitrary fileset entry with an existing file from the fileset specified by the filesetname attribute, then performs a stat() operation on it.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop. XXX

  • filesetname = filename = One of this attributes is mandatory. The filename attribute specifies the name of a file. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular file to access. The filesetname attribute specifies the name of a fileset. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular fileset to access.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked. XXX: but what happens with fd in the followin iterations?

Syntax

flowop statfile name=,filesetname=[,fd=file-desc-number][,index=]

deletefile

Emulates delete of a file. Picks either an arbitrary, index specified, or file-descriptor-number specified, filesetentry whose file exists from the fileset specified by the filesetname attribute, and deletes it.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop. XXX

  • fd = The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

  • filesetname = filename = One of this attributes is mandatory. The filename attribute specifies the name of a file. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular file to access. The filesetname attribute specifies the name of a fileset. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular fileset to access.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked. XXX: but what happens with fd in the followin iterations?

Syntax

flowop deletefile name=,fileset=[,fd=][,index=]


Directory Flowops

Making, listing and removing directories. The fileset must have been defined to include empty directory entries (leafdirs) in addition to or instead of files. Specific directories can be accessed by passing a directory index number to the flowop, which can be obtained from a random variable to provide random directory accesses. Otherwise directories will be accessed round robin style.

MakeDir

Emulates mkdir command. Picks either an arbitrary or index-specified fileset entry for a directory which does not exist in file system from the fileset specified by the filesetname attribute, and makes it.

Attribute

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop. XXX

  • fd = The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

  • filesetname = filename = One of this attributes is mandatory. The filename attribute specifies the name of a file. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular file to access. The filesetname attribute specifies the name of a fileset. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular fileset to access.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked. XXX: but what happens with fd in the followin iterations?

Syntax

XXX: Why FD is needed here?..

flowop makedir name=,fileset=[,fd=][,index=]

ListDir

Emulates ls of a directory. Picks either an arbitrary or index-specified filesetentry for a directory which exists in file system from the fileset specified by the filesetname attribute, and lists it.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop. XXX

  • fd = The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

  • filesetname = filename = One of this attributes is mandatory. The filename attribute specifies the name of a file. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular file to access. The filesetname attribute specifies the name of a fileset. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular fileset to access.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked. XXX: but what happens with fd in the followin iterations?

Syntax

flowop listdir name=,fileset=[,fd=][,index=]

RemoveDir

Emulates an rmdir. Picks either an arbitrary or index specified fileset entry for a directory which exists in file system from the fileset specified by the filesetname attribute, and removes it.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop. XXX

  • fd = The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

  • filesetname = filename = One of this attributes is mandatory. The filename attribute specifies the name of a file. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular file to access. The filesetname attribute specifies the name of a fileset. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular fileset to access.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked. XXX: but what happens with fd in the followin iterations?

Syntax

flowop removedir name=,fileset=[,fd=][,index=]


Flowop Asynchronous I/O Operations

aiowrite

Emulates POSIX aiowrite(). Filebench supports asynchronous writes and implements a mechanism to wait for their completion. An Asynchronous I/O (aio) element is used to associate the asynchronous write request with its subsequent completion. An aiowrite flowop will add an aio to the thread's aio list, an aiowait flowop will wait for half the current list to complete (minimum of 1), removing completed ones from the list.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Flowop name.

  • filesetname = filename = Mandatory. Fileset to pick a file from. If file is not opened yet, this flowop will open the file. The filename attribute specifies the name of a file. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular file to access. The filesetname attribute specifies the name of a fileset. It is used with I/O flowops to specify which particular fileset to access.

  • iosize = Mandatory? The iosize attribute is used to specify the size of the I/O operatio. It defaults to XXX.

  • random Mandatory. Offset is picked randomly. Specify that a random location within the file be picked for access. Without this attribute, the next sequential file blocks will be read or written.

  • directio Optional. Open with DIRECT. Specifies opening the file in direct, rather than buffered, I/O mode. Essentially bypasses filesystem caches, so each I/O request results in an actual I/O to the attached device. Needs to be specified with the flowop that opens the file, which is often openfile, but can be one of the other I/O flowops.

  • dsync Optional. Open with SYNC. Specifies the use of synchronous writes, which do not complete until the attached device has written the data to non volatile storage. Not only does this disable filesystem write back caching, it also is supposed to prevent device (such as an attached disk drive) from doing write back caching. This attribute needs to be specified with all flowops that might open the file, as the file must be opened as a synchronous file for this attribute to be effective. While openfile is often used for that purpose, any of the other flowops will open a file if it is not already open, so they may need the attribute defined as well.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

  • opennext The opennext attribute is used with I/O flowops to indicate that the flowop should open a different file with each invocation. XXX there is something funky with this in the code.

  • workingset = Optional. Maximum value of the offset to pick withing the file. The workingset attribute is used by some I/O flowops to specify a maximum byte range of the file that will actually be read from or written to. This can be less than the actual file size, or for writes may also be larger than the current size, where it serves to set the maximum size the file can grow to.

  • fd = Optional. File descriptor to use. Default is 0. The fd parameter to the flowop clause is used to explicitly set the file descriptor on which the file is opened. This is useful where the script is used to emulate an application that has a number of files open on different descriptors or does involved opens/closes using a limited or extended range of descriptors.

Syntax

flowop aiowrite name=<name>,filename|fileset=<fname>,iosize=<size>,random[,directio][,dsync][,iters=<count>] [,opennext][,workingset=<size>][,fd=<file desc num>]

Examples

flowop aiowrite name=myaiowrite,fileset="myfileset",iosize=4kb,random

aiowait

Emulate posix aiowait(). Waits for the completion of half the outstanding asynchronous I/Os, or a single I/O, which ever is larger. The routine will return after a sufficient number of asynchronous writes issued by any thread in the procflow have completed, or a 1 second time-out elapses. All completed I/O operations are deleted from the thread's list of asynchronous I/Os in progress.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Flowop name.

  • target = Mandatory. Which aiowrite flowop to wait for.

Syntax

flowop aiowait name=<name>,target=<aiowrite-flowop>

Example

flowop aiowait name=myaiowait,target=myaiowrite


Flowop Synchronization Operations

block

Blocks the threadflow until woken up by the wakeup flowop.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

Syntax

flowop block name=

Examples

flowop block name=myblock

wakeup

Wakes up one or more blocked target flowops.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop.

  • target = Name of the target flowop to wake up. The set of targets consists of all flowops whose name matches this flowop's target attribute.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

Syntax

flowop wakeup name=,target=

semblock

Attempts to pass a semaphore and blocks if necessary.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop.

  • value = Value to decrement before proceeding.

  • highwater Maximum value that semaphore can grow up to.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

  • blocking XXX

Syntax

flowop semblock name=<name>,value=<decrement-to-receive>, highwater=<inbound-queue-max>

Examples

flowop semblock name=mysem,value=1, highwater=100

sempost

Post to a set of semblock flowops identified by the target attribute.

Attributes

  • name = Name of the flowop.

  • target = Target semblock flowops to post increment.

  • value = Value to post to the semblock.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

  • blocking XXX

Syntax

flowop sempost name=<name>,target=<semblock-flowop>,value=<increment-to-post>

Examples

flowop sempost name=mysempost,target=mysemblock,value=1


Flowop Misc Operation

hog

Consumes CPU cycles and memory bandwidth by looping for value iterations, while setting the first byte of the thread's memory region to 1 on each iteration.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop.

  • value = Mandatory. Number of loops to make.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

Syntax

flowop hog name=<name>,value=<number-of-mem-ops>

Examples

flowop hog name=myhog,value=1000

delay

Delays for value number of seconds using the user sleep routine.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop.

  • value = Mandatory. Number of seconds to sleep for.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

Syntax

flowop delay name=<name>,value=<number-of-seconds>

Examples

flowop delay name=mydelay,value=5

eventlimit

Completes one invocation per posted event. If events are available, it removes one and continues to the next flowop, otherwise it blocks until one or more new events are posted.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

Syntax

flowop eventlimit name=<name>

Examples

flowop eventlimit name=myeventlimit

bwlimit

Blocks the calling thread if the number of bytes of I/O issued exceeds one megabyte times the number of posted events, thus limiting the average I/O byte rate to one megabyte times the event rate. To set the event rate see use eventgen rate command. If a target flowop is specified than the I/O bandwidth produced by that particular flowop (separately for each thread) sets the limit.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop.

  • target = Optional. Flowop which I/O is counted. Defaultis is all threads.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

Syntax

flowop bwlimit name=<name>,[target=<io-producing-flowop]

Examples

flowop bwlimit name=mybwlimit

iopslimit

Blocks the calling thread if the number of issued I/O operations exceeds the number of posted events, thus limiting the average I/O operation rate to one I/O per event. To set the event rate see use eventgen rate command. If a target flowop is specified than the i/o operations produced by that particular flowop (separately for each thread) sets the limit.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop.

  • target = Optional. Flowop which I/O is counted. Defaultis is all threads.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

Syntax

flowop iopslimit name=<name>,[target=<io-producing-flowop]

Examples

flowop iopslimit name=myiopslimit

opslimit

Blocks the calling thread if the number of issued filebench operations exceeds the number of posted events, thus limiting the average filebench operation rate to one per event. If a target flowop is specified than the operations (generally number of times called) produced by that particular flowop (separately for each thread) sets the limit.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop.

  • target = Optional. Flowop which I/O is counted. Defaultis is all threads.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

Syntax

flowop opslimit name=<name>,[target=<any-flowop]

Examples

flowop opslimit name=myopslimit

finishoncount

Stops the filebench run when the number of any I/O operations specified by value have been performed. If a target flowop is specified than the operations count produced by that particular flowop (separately for each thread) determines when to stop.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop.

  • value= Mandatory. The number of operations to finish on.

  • target = Optional. Flowop which I/O is counted. Defaultis is all threads.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

Syntax

flowop finishoncount name=<name>,value=<ops>,[target=<any-flowop]

Examples

flowop finishoncount name=<name>,value=<ops/s>,[target=<any-flowop]

finishonbytes

Stops the filebench run when the number of bytes of I/O specified by value have been read and/or written. If a target flowop is specified than the I/O bandwidth produced by that particular flowop (separately for each thread) determines when to stop.

Attributes

  • name = Mandatory. Name of the flowop.

  • value= Mandatory. The number of megabytes to finish on.

  • target = Optional. Flowop which I/O is counted. Defaultis is all threads.

  • iters = Individual flowops may be executed multiple times each time they are invoked by setting the iters attribute to the desired number of executions. If not specified, the flowop will only be executed once each time it is invoked.

Syntax

flowop finishonbytes name=,value=,[target=<io-producing-flowop]

Examples

flowop finishonbytes name=myfinish,value=1024000

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