Pure bash deployment tool with customisable strategies.
Shell Ruby
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README.md

Deliver is a pure bash deployment tool with virtually no dependencies. It only cares about having enough info in the shell environment to do its job. Why add Ruby or Python wrappers on top of system commands when bash was built for this?

Capistrano was just infuriating when you added rvm and bundler into the mix, git-deploy is great for single server, but what if you're running a bunch of auto-scaled clusters (Ruby, node.js etc.)?

Delivering a nodejs service to multiple hosts:

deliver nodejs service to multiple hosts

Delivering deliver to github:pages (very inception-esque):

deliver deliver to github:pages

Strategies is what sets this utility apart from everything else. By default, it comes with strategies for:

You can also add your own, project-specific strategies, or customise existing ones. Read more about deliver strategies.

1 INSTALLATION

1.1 Check out deliver into ~/.deliver.

$ git clone git://github.com/gerhard/deliver.git ~/.deliver

1.2 Add ~/.deliver/bin to your $PATH for access to the deliver command-line utility

$ echo 'export PATH="${PATH}:$HOME/.deliver/bin"' >> ~/.bash_profile
# if using zsh
$ echo 'export PATH="${PATH}:$HOME/.deliver/bin"' >> ~/.zshrc

1.3 Source your shell profile

$ . ~/.bash_profile
# if using zsh
$ . ~/.zshrc 

1.4 Personalize

There are no generators or initializers, you will need to manually create a .deliver/config file in the app's root folder that you want to deliver.

This is a good example:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

APP="events"
HOSTS="ruby-1,ruby-2"
PORT="5000"

2 USAGE

From the root of your project, run:

$ deliver check

deliver check

This will print the most important config settings and ensure that deliver has everything that it needs for a successful run.

Deliver will use the ruby strategy by default. If you want to use a different one, specify it in your .deliver/config file.

To see a list of available strategies:

$ deliver strategies

Read more about deliver strategies

To see all supported options and actions:

$ deliver -h|--help

3 LICENSE

(The MIT license)

Copyright (c) Gerhard Lazu

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

4 CREDITS

Deliver started at GoSquared. It was a place where each of us was free to use their own programming language. As long as the service exposed an API and had decent test coverage, anything went. Yes, even PHP.

INSPIRATION

"Rather than fitting a large number of complex primitives, choose a small number of simple primitives that can be combined in an infinite way to produce complex results. What was left out is more important than what was put in." AT&T - the UNIX operating system