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Merge pull request #8 from craiglittle/patch-1

Quick typo fix
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2 parents 729faeb + 7bd9437 commit d0420ade9426890653d89d1e2cb4128d28db30ed Karl Seguin committed Mar 6, 2012
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@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@ Nothing could be more representative of this sudden shift than the progress of N
Even though these transitions seem to happen overnight, the reality is that they can take years to become accepted practice. The initial enthusiasm is driven by a relatively small set of developers and companies. Solutions are refined, lessons learned and seeing that a new technology is here to stay, others slowly try it for themselves. Again, this is particularly true in the case of NoSQL where many solutions aren't replacements for more traditional storage solutions, but rather address a specific need in addition to what one might get from traditional offerings.
-Having said all of that, the first thing we ought to do is explain what is meant by NoSQL. It's a broad term that means different things to different people. Personally, I use it very broadly to mean a system that plays a part in the storage of data. Put another way, NoSQL (again, for me), is the belief that your persistence layer isn't necessarily the responsibility of a single system. Where relational database vendors have historically tried to position their software as a one-size-fits-all solution, NoSQL leans towards smaller units of responsibility where the best tool for a given job can be leveraged. So, your NoSQL stack might still leverage a relational databases, say MySQL, but it'll also contain Redis as a persistence lookup for specific parts of the system as well as Hadoop for your intensive data processing. Put simply, NoSQL is about being open and aware of alternative, existing and additional patterns and tools for managing your data.
+Having said all of that, the first thing we ought to do is explain what is meant by NoSQL. It's a broad term that means different things to different people. Personally, I use it very broadly to mean a system that plays a part in the storage of data. Put another way, NoSQL (again, for me), is the belief that your persistence layer isn't necessarily the responsibility of a single system. Where relational database vendors have historically tried to position their software as a one-size-fits-all solution, NoSQL leans towards smaller units of responsibility where the best tool for a given job can be leveraged. So, your NoSQL stack might still leverage a relational database, say MySQL, but it'll also contain Redis as a persistence lookup for specific parts of the system as well as Hadoop for your intensive data processing. Put simply, NoSQL is about being open and aware of alternative, existing and additional patterns and tools for managing your data.
You might be wondering where MongoDB fits into all of this. As a document-oriented database, Mongo is a more generalized NoSQL solution. It should be viewed as an alternative to relational databases. Like relational databases, it too can benefit from being paired with some of the more specialized NoSQL solutions. MongoDB has advantages and drawbacks, which we'll cover in later parts of this book.

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