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Execute Wukong code within the Hadoop framework.
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Merge "Bump wukong and fix failing specs Bump version to 0.2.0"

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README.md

Wukong-Hadoop

The Hadoop plugin for Wukong lets you run Wukong processors through Hadoop's command-line streaming interface.

Before you use Wukong-Hadoop to develop, test, and write your Hadoop jobs, you might want to read about Wukong, write some simple processors, and read about the structure of a map/reduce job.

You might also want to check out some other projects which enrich the Wukong and Hadoop experience:

  • wukong-storm: Run Wukong processors within the Storm framework. Model flows locally before you run them.
  • wukong-load: Load the output data from your local Wukong jobs and flows into a variety of different data stores.
  • wonderdog: Connect Wukong processors running within Hadoop to Elasticsearch as either a source or sink for data.
  • wukong-deploy: Orchestrate Wukong and other wu-tools together to support an application running on the Infochimps Platform.

Installation & Setup

Wukong-Hadoop can be installed as a RubyGem:

$ sudo gem install wukong-hadoop

If you actually want to run your map/reduce jobs on a Hadoop cluster, you'll of course need one handy. Ironfan is a great tool for building and managing Hadoop clusters and other distributed infrastructure quickly and easily.

To run Hadoop jobs through Wukong-Hadoop, you'll need to move your your Wukong code to each member of the Hadoop cluster, install Wukong-Hadoop on each, and log in and launch your job fron one of them. Ironfan again helps with configuring this.

Anatomy of a map/reduce job

A map/reduce job consists of two separate phases, the map phase and the reduce phase which are connected by an intermediary sort phase.

The wu-hadoop command-line tool is used to run Wukong processors in the shape of a map/reduce job, whether locally or on a Hadoop cluster.

The examples used in this README are all taken from the /examples directory within the Wukong-Hadoop source code. They implement the usual "word count" example.

Test and Develop Map/Reduce Jobs Locally

Hadoop is a powerful tool designed to process huge amounts of data very quickly. It's not designed to make developing Hadoop jobs iterative and simple. Wukong-Hadoop lets you define a map/reduce job and execute it locally, on small amounts of sample data, then launch that job into a Hadoop cluster when you're sure it works.

From Processors to Mappers & Reducers

Wukong processors can be used either for the map phase or the reduce phase of a map/reduce job. Different processors can be defined in different .rb files or within the same one.

Map-phase processors would filter, transform, or otherwise modify input records getting them ready for the reduce. Reduce-phase processors typically perform aggregative operations like counting, grouping, averaging, &c.

Given that you've already created a map/reduce job (just like this word count example that comes with Wukong-Hadoop), the first thing to try is to run the job locally on sample input data in flat files. The --mode=local flag tells wu-hadoop to run in local mode, suitable for development and testing of jobs:

$ wu-hadoop examples/word_count.rb --mode=local --input=examples/sonnet_18.txt
a   2
all 1
and 2
And 3
art 1
...

Wukong-Hadoop looks for processors named :mapper and a :reducer in the word_count.rb file. To understand what's going on under the hood, pass the --dry_run option:

$ wu-hadoop examples/word_count.rb --mode=local --input=examples/sonnet_18.txt --dry_run
I, [2012-11-27T19:24:21.238429 #20104]  INFO -- : Dry run:
cat examples/sonnet_18.txt | wu-local /home/user/wukong-hadoop/examples/word_count.rb --run=mapper | sort | wu-local /home/user/wukong-hadoop/examples/word_count.rb --run=reducer

which shows that wu-hadoop is ultimately relying on wu-local to do the heavy-lifting. You can copy, paste, and run this longer command (or a portion of it) when debugging.

You can also pass options to your processors:

$ wu-hadoop examples/word_count.rb  --mode=local --input=examples/sonnet_18.txt --fold_case --min_length=3
all 1
and 5
art 1
brag    1
...

Sometimes you may want to use a given processor in multiple jobs. You can therefore define each processor in separate files if you want. If Wukong-Hadoop doesn't find processors named :mapper and :reducer it will try to use processors named after the files you pass it:

$ wu-hadoop examples/tokenizer.rb examples/counter.rb --mode=local --input=examples/sonnet_18.txt
a   2
all 1
and 2
And 3
art 1
...

You can also just specify the processors you want to run using the --mapper and --reducer options:

$ wu-hadoop examples/processors.rb --mode=local --input=examples/sonnet_18.txt --mapper=tokenizer --reducer=counter
a   2
all 1
and 2
And 3
art 1
...

Map-Only Jobs

If Wukong-Hadoop can't find a processor named :reducer (and you didn't give it two files explicitly) then it will run a map-only job:

$ wu-hadoop examples/tokenizer.rb --mode=local --input=examples/sonnet_18.txt
Shall
I
compare
thee
...

You can force this behavior using using the --reduce_tasks option:

$ wu-hadoop examples/word_count.rb --mode=local --input=examples/sonnet_18.txt --reduce_tasks=0
Shall
I
compare
thee
...

Sort Options

For some kinds of jobs, you may have special requirements about how you sort. You can specify an explicit --sort_command option:

$ wu-hadoop examples/word_count.rb --mode=local --input=examples/sonnet_18.txt --sort_command='sort -r'
winds   1
When    1
wander'st   1
untrimm'd   1
...

Something Other than Wukong/Ruby?

Wukong-Hadoop even lets you use mappers and reducers which aren't themselves Wukong processors or even Ruby code. The :counter processor is here replaced by good old uniq:

$ wu-hadoop examples/processors.rb --mode=local --input=examples/sonnet_18.txt --mapper=tokenizer --reduce_command='uniq -c'
      2 a
      1 all
      2 and
      3 And
      1 art
...

This is a good method for getting a little performance bump (if your job is CPU-bound) or even lifting other, non-Hadoop or non-Wukong aware code into the Hadoop world:

$ wu-hadoop --mode=local --input=examples/sonnet_18.txt --map_command='python tokenizer.py' --reduce_command='python counter.py'
a   2
all 1
and 2
And 3
art 1
...

The only requirement on tokenizer.py and counter.py is that they work the same way as their Ruby Wukong::Processor equivalents: one line at a time from STDIN to STDOUT.

Running in Hadoop

Once you've got your code working locally, you can easily make it run inside of Hadoop by just changing the --mode option. You'll also need to specify --input and --output paths that Hadoop can access, either on the HDFS or on something like Amazon's S3 if you're using AWS and have properly configured your Hadoop cluster.

Here's the very first example from the Local section above, but executed within a Hadoop cluster, reading and writing data from the HDFS.

$ wu-hadoop examples/word_count.rb --mode=hadoop --input=/data/sonnet_18.txt --output=/data/word_count.tsv
I, [2012-11-27T19:27:18.872645 #20142]  INFO -- : Launching Hadoop!
I, [2012-11-27T19:27:18.873477 #20142]  INFO -- : Running

/usr/lib/hadoop/bin/hadoop  \
  jar /usr/lib/hadoop/contrib/streaming/hadoop-*streaming*.jar  \
  -D mapred.job.name='word_count---/data/sonnet_18.txt---/data/word_count.tsv'  \
  -mapper       'wu-local /home/user/wukong-hadoop/examples/word_count.rb --run=mapper'     \
  -reducer      'wu-local /home/user/wukong-hadoop/examples/word_count.rb --run=reducer'    \
  -input        '/data/sonnet_18.txt'   \
  -output       '/data/word_count.tsv'  \
12/11/28 01:32:09 INFO mapred.FileInputFormat: Total input paths to process : 1
12/11/28 01:32:10 INFO streaming.StreamJob: getLocalDirs(): [/mnt/hadoop/mapred/local, /mnt2/hadoop/mapred/local]
12/11/28 01:32:10 INFO streaming.StreamJob: Running job: job_201210241848_0043
12/11/28 01:32:10 INFO streaming.StreamJob: To kill this job, run:
12/11/28 01:32:10 INFO streaming.StreamJob: /usr/lib/hadoop/bin/hadoop job  -Dmapred.job.tracker=10.124.54.254:8021 -kill job_201210241848_0043
12/11/28 01:32:10 INFO streaming.StreamJob: Tracking URL: http://ip-10-124-54-254.ec2.internal:50030/jobdetails.jsp?jobid=job_201210241848_0043
12/11/28 01:32:11 INFO streaming.StreamJob:  map 0%  reduce 0%
...

Hadoop throws an error if your output path already exists. If you're running the same job over and over, it can be annoying to constantly have to remember to delete the output path from your last run. Use the --rm option in this case to automatically remove the output path before launching a Hadoop job (this only works for Hadoop mode).

Advanced Hadoop Usage

For small or lightweight jobs, all you have to do to move from local to Hadoop is change the --mode flag when executing your jobs with wu-hadoop.

More complicated jobs that require either special code to be available (new input/output formats, CLASSPATH or RUBYLIB hacking, &c.) or require tuning at the level of Hadoop to run efficiently.

Other Input/Output Formats

Hadoop streaming uses the TextInputFormat and TextOutputFormat by default. These turn all input/output data into newline delimited string records which creates a perfect match for the command-line and the local mode of Wukong-Hadoop.

Other input and output formats can be specified with the --input_format and --output_format options.

Tuning

Hadoop offers many, many options for configuring a particular Hadoop job as well as the Hadoop cluster itself. Wukong-Hadoop wraps many of these familiar options (mapred.map.tasks, mapred.reduce.tasks, mapred.task.timeout, &c.) with friendlier names (map_tasks, reduce_tasks, timeout, &c.). See a complete list using wu-hadoop --help.

Java options themselves can be set directly using the --java_opts flag. You can also use the --dry_run option again to see the constructed Hadoop invocation without running it:

$ wu-hadoop examples/word_count.rb --mode=hadoop --input=/data/sonnet_18.txt --output=/data/word_count.tsv --java_opts='-D foo.bar=3 -D something.else=hello' --dry_run
I, [2012-11-27T19:47:08.872784 #20512]  INFO -- : Launching Hadoop!
I, [2012-11-27T19:47:08.873630 #20512]  INFO -- : Dry run:
/usr/lib/hadoop/bin/hadoop  \
  jar /usr/lib/hadoop/contrib/streaming/hadoop-*streaming*.jar  \
  -D mapred.job.name='word_count---/data/sonnet_18.txt---/data/word_count.tsv'  \
  -D foo.bar=3  \
  -D something.else=hello   \
  -mapper       'wu-local /home/user/wukong-hadoop/examples/word_count.rb --run=mapper'     \
  -reducer      'wu-local /home/user/wukong-hadoop/examples/word_count.rb --run=reducer'    \
  -input        '/data/sonnet_18.txt'   \
  -output       '/data/word_count.tsv'  \

Accessing Hadoop Runtime Data

Hadoop streaming exposes several environment variables to scripts it executes, including mapper and reducer scripts launched by wu-hadoop. Instead of manually inspecting the ENV within your Wukong processors, you can use the following methods defined for commonly accessed parameters:

  • input_file: Path of the (data) file currently being processed.
  • input_dir: Directory of the (data) file currently being processed.
  • map_input_start_offset: Offset of the chunk currently being processed within the current input file.
  • map_input_length: Length of the chunk currently being processed within the current input file.
  • attempt_id: ID of the current map/reduce attempt.
  • curr_task_id: ID of the current map/reduce task.

or use the hadoop_streaming_parameter method for the others.

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