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#rvmrc.sh

##SYN

A simple script which creates a rvmrc interactively. Presents you with a choice of rubies, and then creates the gemset name based on the directory name.

#usage.sh

#SYN

Reads from the top of a shell script for a comment line like "#USAGE", reads again, recording all the input, till it sees "#USAGE", at which point it generates a function "usage" in the current namespace which displays that information

#USAGE (meta, I know.)

imagine a script like:

#!/bin/bash
#USAGE
# bar     | does a thing
#USAGE
function foo {
    bar() {
      echo "baz"
    }
}

if you do:

#!/bin/bash
#USAGE
# bar     | does a thing
#USAGE
function foo {
    source "usage.sh"

    bar() {
      echo "baz"
    }
    
    case $1 in 
      bar) bar
      usage) usage $PWD/$0
    esac
}
foo $@

and reply by echoing the content between "#USAGE" tags, without the '#'s, and with all other spacing preserved. eg:

 bar     | does a thing

#tmuxen.sh

##SYN

tmuxen.sh provides functions for managing multiple-concurrent tmux sessions, with decoupled windows. That is to say, two different terminals (perhaps remote ) can connect to the same tmux session, observe different windows simultaneously, and (assuming they're on different windows) edit content simultaneously.

tmux already provides this functionality, but access to it is non-trivial, and leaves some garbage which needs to be collected periodically. This script aims to simplify and automate those processes.

in addition, tmuxen.sh represents an opinionated configuration of tmux, designed to be trivial to install and start using. It further provides a way to script ohe setup of a "shared" environment which will be syndicated across multiple sessions. See USE CASES for details thereupon.

##INTERFACE

tmux spawn <session> [-w <script>]

spawns a new session with as the name, does not attach to the session. If <script> is provided, that script is executed with the session's name as it's first argument. This allows the scripting of the setup of the new session.

tmux connect <session>

attaches to an existing session, but in a desynced way, as described above

tmux kill <session>

kills the named session, and detaches all attached tmuxen

tmux garbage [<session>]

removes all duplicated connections to the given session to which noone is attached. If no session is given, does this for all sessions. Eg, assume there are sessions like:

  foo     A
  foo-1
  foo-2   A
  bar
  bar-1
  bar-2

Running tmux garbage foo will leave you with:

  foo   A
  foo-2 A
  bar
  bar-1
  bar-2

and running tmux garbage will leave you with:

  foo   A
  foo-2 A
  bar

The next foo session will be foo-3. It is suggested that this command is run often, to avoid cluttering your tmux server and potentially affecting performance.

tmux prune <session>

removes all but the original tmux session, removes even clients attached in sub-sessions. Eg, given

  foo     A
  foo-1
  foo-2   A
  bar
  bar-1
  bar-2

Running tmux prune foo, will give:

  foo     A
  bar
  bar-1
  bar-2

##INSTALLATION

install with:

curl <url> | sh

if you want to remove tmuxen, running

tmux tmuxen-implode

will restore normal tmux functionality, and -- if .tmux.conf.existing exists, will prompt you to swap your current .tmux.conf for that (writing .tmux.conf to .tmux.conf.tmuxen in the process)

##ROADMAP

v0.1.0 goals:

1) all command functionality present, with manual testing
2) config included in script
3) bash bomb installation (a la bash + curl / bash + wget)

v0.5.0 goals:

1) install/implode functionality in place,
2) some automatic testing where possible.
    (unit testing bash scripts is often non-trivial)

v1.0.0 goals:

1) scripting/hooks for commands.
2) full automatic testing suite (dependent on building such a thing)

v1.0.0 goals:

merge some of this functionality into tmux proper? :)

##GLOSSARY

tmux, n. (pl. "tmuxen")
  1. A tool for multiplexing a terminal emulator.

  2. A single named session of the tmux multiplexer.

    to tmux, v.

  3. To make use of the "tmux" tool, "tmuxen" is an irregular gerund form of this verb.

    session, n.

  4. A set of attached clients to a given tmux, eg, I have a "play" session, which has three clients attached

    client, n.

  5. A single terminal emulator, running the tmux program, which is attached to a single session.

    to attach, v.

  6. To add oneself (syncronously) to a session. Meaning that your terminal will exactly mirror any other terminal attached to that session

    to connect, v.

  7. To add oneself (desyncronously) to a session. Meaning that your terminal is free to move to another shell in the session

    window, n. (syn: "subshell", "shell", "terminal")

  8. A single multiplex terminal emulator within a given tmux

##USE CASES

  1. Sharing an IRC session across a "work" and "play" tmux

I start by spawning a tmux via tmux spawn irc, in which I execute my favorite IRC client. Also, I turn off the statusline for this tmux.

I then spawn two more tmuxen, eg tmux spawn work and tmux spawn play. In each, I open a shell and attach to the "irc" tmux. This is a syncronous attachment, but there is only one window. The effect is that I have joined these two tmuxen to each other, spawning only one instance of the irc program.

This use case also fits when you want to share rtorrent/mpd players/similar "global" programs, but want to separate, as is implied, work from play.

  1. High-speed pair programming

Jack and Jill are writing code, Jack sets up a user account for Jill on his system, Jill ssh's to Jack's system and connects to a tmux session. While Jack is writing up a test, Jill is in another window, setting opening up some files which will need be edited to make the test pass. Jill takes over driving while Jack watches and runs the tests. Jill asks Jack to run a migration to add a property they agree they'll need. While Jack writes the migration, Jill finishes cleaning up the code and gets ready to run the migration.

The benefit here is that this style of high-speed driver switching means you don't have the dreaded "drag along developer" problem. Wherein one member of the pair is doing all the code, and the other is doing nothing but twiddling his thumbs and catching spelling errors. This methodology also is useful in bringing new developers onto the project, since they can handle the more tedious (in the eyes of the more experienced developer) tasks which teach the fundamental aspects of the system, while the main developer is free to focus on extending (and explaining) the more esoteric/complex feature they may be working on.

  1. Bulletin board

For a particularly odd usage, imagine a single machine is running a tmux to which many developers in a team attach. Such a session may contain notes for other developers, a session in which two non-paring developers might connect to do some impromptu knowledge transfer, or contain a continuous stream of exception logs / long lived connections to servers. In this way, the "bulletin board" server can function a virtual meeting ground to facilitate less-formal, teamwide interaction. This is especially useful in a distributed setting.

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A somewhat disorganized collection of bash scripts, including my rcfiles and PS1 script

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