A file system benchmark tool
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Makefile
README
fs_mark.c
fs_mark.h
lib_timing.c
plot_test

README

#
# Copyright (C) 2003-2004 EMC Corporation
#
# fs_mark: Benchmark synchronous/async file creation
#
# Written by Ric Wheeler <ric@emc.com>
#
# This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify
# it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
# the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or
# (at your option) any later version.
#
# This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
# but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
# MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
# GNU General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
# along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
# Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307  USA
#

FS_MARK
==============

The fs_mark program is meant to give a low level bashing to file
systems. The write pattern that we concentrate on is heavily
synchronous IO across mutiple directories, drives, etc.

SAMPLE RUN

A typical run of the program would look like this:

[root@c001n01 tmp]# ./fs_mark -d /mnt/support1/test_bulk -s 10240 -n 1000

#  ./fs_mark  -d  /mnt/support1/test_bulk  -s  10240  -n  1000
#       Version Version 3.1, 1 thread(s) starting at Mon Sep 26 18:44:33 2005
#       Sync method: INBAND FSYNC: fsync() per file in write loop.
#       Directories:  no subdirectories used
#       File names: 40 bytes long, (16 initial bytes of time stamp with 24 random bytes at end of name)
#       Files info: size 10240 bytes, written with an IO size of 16384 bytes per write

#       All system call times are reported in microseconds.

FSUse%        Count         Size  Files/sec
     3         1000        10240       44.6

Or like this (using the verbose output flag):

[root@c001n01 tmp]# ./fs_mark -d /mnt/support1/test_bulk -s 10240 -n 1000 -v

#  ./fs_mark  -d  /mnt/support1/test_bulk  -s  10240  -n  1000  -v
#       Version Version 3.1, 1 thread(s) starting at Mon Sep 26 18:44:59 2005
#       Sync method: INBAND FSYNC: fsync() per file in write loop.
#       Directories:  no subdirectories used
#       File names: 40 bytes long, (16 initial bytes of time stamp with 24 random bytes at end of name)
#       Files info: size 10240 bytes, written with an IO size of 16384 bytes per write

#       All system call times are reported in microseconds.

FSUse%        Count         Size  Files/sec        CREAT (Min/Avg/Max)        WRITE (Min/Avg/Max)        FSYNC (Min/Avg/Max)         SYNC (Min/Avg/Max)      CLOSE (Min/Avg/Max)       UNLINK (Min/Avg/Max)
     3         1000        10240       43.5       24      111    17113       23       48     2937    14281    22811   219942        0        0        0      1        2       21       34       50     1180

Note that the output shows:
      Full: How full the file system is on the first directory specified.
      Count:   How many files have been written so far
      Size:    Size of files written
      Files/sec: The rate that files are written to disk.
      Min/Avg/Max: time spent in the creat/write/fsync/close and unlink system calls.

In this run, we are writing using 4 threads to the specified target directory.

To measure the performance of a file system from empty all the way to
100 used, add the "-F" flag. Note that this test can take days to run
depending on the size of the disk.

In addition to the output, fs_mark writes the output into  a separate
log file that is intended to be easy to parse for graphing. 


A sample gnuplot script is attached for reference.

Command line arguments:

Basic flags: -F, -L, -l, -v, -w

  "-F" loops the test until the entire file system is filled.  Note that
  files are not deleted in this test (-k is set automatically).

  "-L count" loops the test "count" times.

  "-l logfile_name" sets the name of the logfile.

  "-v" adds logging for each system call to record the minimum,
  average and maximum time spent.

  "-w buff_size" controls the size of individual write system calls in
  bytes.

Thread control: -t 

  "-t number" sets the number of threads used by the program. The
  threads are evenly divided between the specified subdirectories. Note that
  the program always uses one thread for each directory specified on the
  command line.

DIRECTORY ARGUMENTS: -d, -D, -N, -M

  The "-d" argument allows you to specify one or more directories to run
  the test against.  One thread is created for each of these root directories.
  Note that "-d" can appear multiple times.

  The "-D num" flag allows you to specify how many subdirectories you
  want to use under each of the above root directories.  Invoking
  fs_mark with "-D 256" would create 256 directories under specified
  directory. Only one thread is used to write to all of the subdirectories.

  The multiple directory scheme helps measure the performance impact of
  using one large directory or many smaller directories. 

  There are several ways of laying out the files in the
  multi-subdirectory tests.

  The "-N num" policy chooses to allocate "num" files per
  subdirectory.  The program uses a simple round robin policy when -N
  is specified.

  If -N is not set, the program lingers in each directory for 180
  seconds before moving onto the next subdirectory.  There is
  currently no parameter to set this linger time.

  The default behavior of "-D" is to use the timed based hash with a
  lingering of 3 minutes per subdirectory.

File specific arguments: -k, -r, -p, -n, -s, -S

  "-k" tells the test retain all created files.

  "-n num" specifies the number of files to be tested.

  "-p num" sets the length in bytes of filenames in a directory. By default, the
  files have sequential (time based) names.

  "-r num" sets the number of random bytes at the end of the file name.
  To have purely random names, use "-p X -r X".

  "-s num" specifies the size(s) of the files to be tested.


Sync Methods:
  "-S number" selects a sync method.

  "-S 0" issues no sync() or fsync() calls at all.  This should always
  be the fastest (if least safe!) way to run the program.

  "-S 1" issues an fsync() system call in the main file writing loop
  before closing the file. This is a common way to insure data
  integrity.

  "-S 2" writes all of the files in a loop without any fsync()
  calls. After this main loop terminates, one single system sync()
  call is issued followed by one fsync() call on the first file
  created per specified directory.  

  The reasoning here is that the system level sync flushed the data
  back to disk and that the fsync() per directory insures that at
  least one write barrier operation flushed the volatile disk cache
  (this is a file system implementation specific behavior). 

  "-S 3" writes all of the files in a loop without any fsync()
  calls. After this main loop terminates, the code iterates
  over the files in reverse order and opens each file, fsync()'s each
  file and closes each file.

  The reasoning here is that the most recent file is most likely to do
  a full fsync and trigger a journal flush, leaving the rest of the
  loop to do little work.

  "-S 4" writes all of the files in a loop without any fsync()
  calls. After this main loop terminates, one system sync() call is
  issued to flush the cache. Out of paranoia, the code then iterates
  over the files in reverse order as above (opens each file, fsync()'s each
  file and closes each file).

  "-S 5" writes all of the files in a loop without any fsync()
  calls. After this main loop terminates, the code iterates
  over the files in order and opens each file, fsync()'s each
  file and closes each file.

  "-S 6" writes all of the files in a loop without any fsync()
  calls. After this main loop terminates, one system sync() call is
  issued to flush the cache. Out of paranoia, the code then iterates
  over the files in order as above (opens each file, fsync()'s each
  file and closes each file).