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README.md

React Loads

React Loads is a backend agnostic library to help with external data fetching & caching in your UI components.

Features

  • Hooks and Render Props to manage your async states & response data
  • Backend agnostic. Use React Loads with REST, GraphQL, or Web SDKs
  • Renderer agnostic. Use React Loads with React DOM, React Native, React VR, etc
  • Automated caching & revalidation to maximise user experience between page transitions
  • React Suspense support
  • SSR support
  • Preloading support
  • Polling support to load data every x seconds
  • Request deduping to minimise over-fetching of your data
  • Focus revalidation to re-fetch your data when the browser window is focused
  • Resources to allow your to hoist common async functions for built-in caching & reusability
  • Finite set of state variables to avoid cryptic ternaries and impossible states
  • External cache support
  • Optimistic responses
  • Pretty small – 5kB gzipped

Table of Contents

Installation

yarn add react-loads

or npm:

npm install react-loads

Quick start

With Hooks

import React from 'react';
import * as Loads from 'react-loads';

async function fetchRandomDog() {
  // Dog fetcher logic here!
  // You can use any type of backend here - REST, GraphQL, you name it!
}

export default function RandomDog() {
  const {
    response,
    error,
    isPending,
    isResolved,
    isRejected
  } = Loads.useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog);
  return (
    <div>
      {isPending && 'Loading...'}
      {isResolved && <img src={response.imgSrc} />}
      {isRejected && `Oh no! ${error.message}`}
    </div>
  )
}

See the CodeSandbox example

The useLoads function accepts three arguments: a context key, an async function, and a config object (not used in this example). The context key will store the response of the fetchRandomDog function in the React Loads cache against the key. The async function is a function that returns a promise, and is used to fetch your data.

The useLoads function also returns a set of values: response, error, and a finite set of states (isIdle, isPending, isResolved, isRejected, and a few others). If your async function resolves, it will update the response & isResolved values. If it rejects, it will update the error value.

IMPORTANT NOTE: You must provide useLoads with a memoized promise (via React.useCallback or bounded outside of your function component as seen in the above example), otherwise useLoads will be invoked on every render.

If you are using React.useCallback, the react-hooks ESLint Plugin is incredibly handy to ensure your hook dependencies are set up correctly.

With Render Props

If your codebase isn't quite hook ready yet, React Loads provides a Render Props interface which shares the same API as the hook:

import React from 'react';
import { Loads } from 'react-loads';

async function fetchRandomDog() {
  // Dog fetcher logic here!
  // You can use any type of backend here - REST, GraphQL, you name it!
}

class RandomDog extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <Loads context="randomDog" fn={fetchRandomDog}>
        {({ response, error, isPending, isResolved, isRejected }) => (
          <div>
            {isPending && 'Loading...'}
            {isResolved && <img src={response.imgSrc} />}
            {isRejected && `Oh no! ${error.message}`}
          </div>
        )}
      </Loads>
    )
  }
}

See the CodeSandbox example

More examples

Guides

Starting out

There are two main hooks: useLoads & useDeferredLoads.

  • useLoads is called on first render,
  • useDeferredLoads is called when you choose to invoke it (it's deferred until later).

Let's focus on the useLoads hook for now, we will explain useDeferredLoads in the next section.

The useLoads hook accepts 3 parameters:

  • A "context key" in the form of a string.
    • It will help us with identifying/storing data, deduping your requests & updating other useLoad's sharing the same context
    • Think of it as the namespace for your data
  • An "async function" in the form of a function that returns a promise
    • This will be the function to resolve the data
  • An optional "config" in the form of an object
import React from 'react';
import * as Loads from 'react-loads';

async function fetchRandomDog() {
  // Dog fetcher logic here!
  // You can use any type of backend here - REST, GraphQL, you name it!
}

export default function RandomDog() {
  const {
    response,
    error,
    load,
    isPending,
    isReloading,
    isResolved,
    isRejected
  } = Loads.useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog);
  return (
    <div>
      {isPending && 'Loading...'}
      {isResolved && (
        <div>
          <img src={response.imgSrc} />
          <button onClick={load} disabled={isReloading}>Load another</button>
        </div>
      )}
      {isRejected && `Oh no! ${error.message}`}
    </div>
  )
}

See the CodeSandbox example

The useLoads hook represents a finite state machine and returns a set of state variables:

  • isIdle if the async function hasn't been invoked yet (relevant for useDeferredLoads)
  • isPending for when the async function is loading
  • isReloading for when the async function is reloading (typically truthy when data already exists in the cache)
  • isResolved for when the async function has resolved
  • isRejected for when the async function has errored

It also returns a response variable if your function resolves, and an error variable if rejected.

If you want to reload your data, useLoads also returns a load variable, which you can invoke.

The useLoads hook returns some other variables as well.

Deferring

Sometimes you don't want your async function to be invoked straight away. This is where the useDeferredLoads hook can be handy. It waits until you manually invoke it.

import React from 'react';
import * as Loads from 'react-loads';

async function fetchRandomDog() {
  // Dog fetcher logic here!
  // You can use any type of backend here - REST, GraphQL, you name it!
}

export default function RandomDog() {
  const {
    response,
    error,
    load,
    isIdle,
    isPending,
    isReloading,
    isResolved,
    isRejected
  } = Loads.useDeferredLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog);
  return (
    <div>
      {isIdle && <button onClick={load}>Load a dog</button>}
      {isPending && 'Loading...'}
      {isResolved && (
        <div>
          <img src={response.imgSrc} />
          <button onClick={load} disabled={isReloading}>Load another</button>
        </div>
      )}
      {isRejected && `Oh no! ${error.message}`}
    </div>
  )
}

See the CodeSandbox example

In the above example, the dog image is fetched via the load variable returned from useDeferredLoads.

There are also some cases where including a context key may not make sense. You can omit it if you want like so:

const { ... } = useDeferredLoads(fetchRandomDog);

Configuration

You can set configuration on either a global level, or a local useLoads level.

On a global level

By setting configuration on a global level, you are setting defaults for all instances of useLoads.

import * as Loads from 'react-loads';

const config = {
  dedupingInterval: 1000,
  timeout: 3000
};

export default function App() {
  return (
    <Loads.Provider config={config}>
      ...
    <Loads.Provider>
  )
}

Warning: The config prop must be memoized. Either memoize it using React.useMemo or put it outside of the function component.

See the full set of configuration options here

On a useLoads level

By setting configuration on a useLoads level, you are overriding any defaults set by Loads.Provider.

const { ... } = useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog, { dedupingInterval: 1000, timeout: 3000 });

See the full set of configuration options here

Variables

If your async function needs some dependant variables (such as an ID or query parameters), use the variables attribute in the useLoads config:

async function fetchDog(id) {
  return axios.get(`https://dog.api/${id}`);
}

export default function DogImage(props) {
  const { ... } = useLoads('dog', fetchDog, { variables: [props.id] });
}

See the CodeSandbox example

The variables attribute accepts an array of values. If your async function accepts more than one argument, you can pass through just as many values to variables as the function accepts:

async function fetchDog(id, foo, bar) {
  // id = props.id
  // foo = { hello: 'world' }
  // bar = true
  return axios.get(`https://dog.api/${id}`);
}

export default function DogImage(props) {
  const { ... } = useLoads('dog', fetchDog, {
    variables: [props.id, { hello: 'world' }, true]
  });
}

WARNING!

It may be tempting to not use the variables attribute at all, and just use the dependencies outside the scope of the function itself. While this works, it will probably produce unexpected results as the cache looks up the record against the context key ('dog') and the set of variables. However, in this case, it will only look up the record against the 'dog' context key meaning that every response will be stored against that key.

// DON'T DO THIS! IT WILL CAUSE UNEXPECTED RESULTS!

export default function DogImage(props) {
  const id = props.id;
  const fetchDog = React.useCallback(() => {
    return axios.get(`https://dog.api/${id}`);
  })
  const { ... } = useLoads('dog', fetchDog);
}

Conditional loaders

If you want to control when useLoads invokes it's async function via a variable, you can use the defer attribute in the config.

export default function RandomDog(props) {
  // Don't fetch until shouldFetch is truthy.
  const { ... } = useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog, {
    defer: !props.shouldFetch
  });
}

See the CodeSandbox example

Dependant loaders

There may be a case where one useLoads depends on the data of another useLoads, where you don't want subsequent useLoads to invoke the async function until the first useLoads resolves.

If you pass a function to variables and the function throws (due to dog being undefined), then the async function will be deferred while it is undefined. As soon as dog is defined, then the async function will be invoked.

export default function RandomDog(props) {
  const { response: dog } = useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog);
  const { response: friends } = useLoads('dogFriends', fetchDogFriends, {
    variables: () => [dog.id]
  })
}

See the CodeSandbox example

Caching

Caching in React Loads comes for free with no initial configuration. React Loads uses the "stale while revalidate" strategy, meaning that useLoads will serve you with cached (stale) data, while it loads new data (revalidates) in the background, and then show the new data (and update the cache) to the user.

Caching strategy

React Loads uses the context argument given to useLoads to store the data in-memory against a "cache key". If variables are present, then React Loads will generate a hash and attach it to the cache key. In a nutshell, cache key = context + variables.

// The response of this will be stored against a "cache key" of `dog.1`
const { ... } = useLoads('dog', fetchDog, { variables: [1] });

React Loads will automatically revalidate whenever the cache key (context or variables) changes.

// The fetchDog function will be fetched again if `props.context` or `props.id` changes.
const { ... } = useLoads(props.context, fetchDog, { variables: [props.id] });

You can change the caching behaviour by specifying a cacheStrategy config option. By default, this is set to "context-and-variables", meaning that the cache key will be a combination of the context + variables.

// The response of this will be stored against a `dog` key, ignoring the variables.
const { ... } = useLoads('dog', fetchDog, { cacheStrategy: 'context-only', variables: [props.id] });

Stale data & revalidation

By default, React Loads automatically revalidates data in the cache after 5 minutes. That is, when the useLoads is invoked and React Loads detects that the data is stale (hasn't been updated for 5 minutes), then useLoads will invoke the async function and update the cache with new data. You can change the revalidation time using the revalidateTime config option.

// Set it globally:
import * as Loads from 'react-loads';

const config = {
  revalidateTime: 600000
}

export default function App() {
  return (
    <Loads.Provider config={config}>
      ...
    </Loads.Provider>
  )
}

// Or, set it locally:
export default function RandomDog() {
  const { ... } = useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog, { revalidateTime: 600000 });
}

Cache expiry

React Loads doesn't set a cache expiration by default. If you would like to set one, you can use the cacheTime config option.

// Set it globally:
import * as Loads from 'react-loads';

const config = {
  cacheTime: 600000
}

export default function App() {
  return (
    <Loads.Provider config={config}>
      ...
    </Loads.Provider>
  )
}

// Or, set it locally:
export default function RandomDog() {
  const { ... } = useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog, { cacheTime: 600000 });
}

Slow connections

On top of the isPending & isReloading states, there are substates called isPendingSlow & isReloadingSlow. If the request is still pending after 5 seconds, then the isPendingSlow/isReloadingSlow states will become truthy, allowing you to indicate to the user that the request is loading slow.

export default function RandomDog() {
  const { isPending, isPendingSlow } = useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog);
  return (
    <div>
      {isPending && `Loading... ${isPendingSlow && 'Taking a while...'}`}
    </div>
  )
}

By default, the timeout is 5 seconds, you can change this with the timeout config option.

Polling

React Loads supports request polling (reload data every x seconds) with the pollingInterval config option.

// Calls fetchRandomDog every 3 seconds.
const { ... } = useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog, { pollingInterval: 3000 });

You can also add a pollWhile config option if you wish to control the behaviour of when the polling should run.

// Calls fetchRandomDog every 3 seconds while `shouldPoll` is truthy.
const shouldPoll = shouldTheDogBePollingRightNow();
const { ... } = useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog, { pollingInterval: 3000, pollWhile: shouldPoll });

You can also access the record as the first parameter of pollWhile if you provide a function.

// Calls processImage every 3 seconds while it's status is 'processing'.
const { ... } = useLoads(
  'randomDog',
  fetchRandomDog,
  { pollingInterval: 3000, pollWhile: record => record?.response?.status === 'processing' }
);

Deduping

By default, all your requests are deduped on an interval of 500 milliseconds. Meaning that if React Loads sees more than one request of the same cache key in under 500 milliseconds, it will not invoke the other requests. You can change the deduping interval with the dedupingInterval config option.

Suspense

To use React Loads with Suspense, you can set the suspense config option to true.

// Set it globally:
import * as Loads from 'react-loads';

const config = {
  suspense: true
}

export default function App() {
  return (
    <Loads.Provider config={config}>
      ...
    </Loads.Provider>
  )
}

// Or, set it locally:
export default function RandomDog() {
  const { ... } = useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog, { suspense: true });
}

Once enabled, you can use the React.Suspense component to replicate the isPending state, and use error boundaries to display error states.

function RandomDog() {
  const { response } = useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog, { suspense: true });
  return <img src={response.imgSrc} />;
}

function App() {
  return (
    <React.Suspense fallback={<div>loading...</div>}>
      <RandomDog />
    </React.Suspense>
  )
}

Optimistic responses

React Loads has the ability to optimistically update your data while it is still waiting for a response (if you know what the response will potentially look like). Once a response is received, then the optimistically updated data will be replaced by the response. This article explains the gist of optimistic UIs pretty well.

The setResponse function is provided in a meta object as seen below.

import React from 'react';
import * as Loads from 'react-loads';

async function fetchDog(id) {
  // Fetch the dog
}

function updateDog(id, data) {
  return async meta => {
    meta.setResponse(data);
    // Fetch the dog
  }
}

export default function RandomDog(props) {
  const dogRecord = Loads.useLoads('dog', fetchDog, { variables: [props.id] });

  const updateDogRecord = Loads.useDeferredLoads('dog', updateDog);

  return (
    <div>
      {dogRecord.isPending && 'Loading...'}
      {dogRecord.isResolved && <img src={dogRecord.response.imgSrc} />}
      {dogRecord.isRejected && `Oh no! ${dogRecord.error.message}`}
      <button
        onClick={() => updateDogRecord.load(props.id, { imgSrc: 'cooldog.png' })}
      >
        Update dog
      </button>
    </div>
  )
}

Resources

For async functions which may be used & invoked in many parts of your application, it may make sense to hoist and encapsulate them into resources. A resource consists of one (or more) async function as well as a context.

Below is an example of a resource and it's usage:

import React from 'react';
import * as Loads from 'react-loads';

// 1. Define your async function.
async function getUsers() {
  const response = await fetch('/users');
  const users = await response.json();
  return users;
}

// 2. Create your resource, and attach the loading function.
const usersResource = Loads.createResource({
  context: 'users',
  fn: getUsers
});

function MyComponent() {
  // 3. Invoke the useLoads function in your resource.
  const getUsersRecord = usersResource.useLoads();

  // 4. Use the record variables:
  const users = getUsersRecord.response || [];

  return (
    <div>
      {getUsersRecord.isPending && 'loading...'}
      {getUsersRecord.isResolved && (
        <ul>
          {users.map(user => (
            <li key={user.id}>
              {user.name}
            </li>
          ))}
        </ul>
      )}
    </div>
  )
}

See the CodeSandbox example

You can attach more than one loading function to a resource. But it's return value must be the same schema, as every response will update the cache.

You can also provide an array of 2 items to the resource creator (seen below with delete); the first item being the async function, and the second being the config.

Here is an extended example using a resource with multiple async functions, split into two files (resources/users.js & index.js):

resources/users.js

import * as Loads from 'react-loads';

async function getUser(id) {
  const response = await fetch(`/users/${id}`);
  const user = await response.json();
  return user;
}

function updateUser(id, data) {
  return async meta => {
    await fetch(`/users/${id}`, {
      method: 'post',
      body: JSON.stringify(data)
    });
    // `cachedRecord` is the record that's currently stored in the cache.
    const currentUser = meta.cachedRecord.response;
    const updatedUser = { ...currentUser, ...data };
    return updatedUser;
  }
}

async function deleteUser(id) {
  await fetch(`/users/${id}`, { method: 'delete' });
  return;
}

export default Loads.createResource({
  context: 'user',
  fn: getUser,
  // You can supply either a async function, or an array of async function/config pairs.
  update: [updateUser, { timeout: 3000 }],
  delete: deleteUser
});

index.js

import React from 'react';

import DeleteUserButton from './DeleteUserButton';
import UpdateUserForm from './UpdateUserForm';
import usersResource from './resources/users';

function MyComponent(props) {
  const { userId } = props;

  const getUserRecord = usersResource.useLoads({
    variables: [userId]
  });
  const user = getUserRecord.response || {};

  const updateUserRecord = usersResource.update.useDeferredLoads({ variables: [userId] });
  const deleteUserRecord = usersResource.delete.useDeferredLoads({ variables: [userId] });

  return (
    <div>
      {getUserRecord.isPending && 'loading...'}
      {getUserRecord.isResolved && (
        <div>
          Username: {user.name}

          <DeleteUserButton
            isLoading={deleteUserRecord.isPending}
            onClick={deleteUserRecord.load}
          />

          <UpdateUserForm onSubmit={data => updateUserRecord.load(userId, data)} />
        </div>
      )}
    </div>
  )
}

External cache providers

If you would like the ability to persist response data upon unmounting the application (e.g. page refresh or closing window), a cache provider can also be utilised to cache response data.

Here is an example using Store.js. You can either set the external cache provider on a global level or a useLoads level.

On a global level

import * as Loads from 'react-loads';
import store from 'store';

const config = {
  cacheProvider: {
    get: key => store.get(key),
    set: (key, val) => store.set(key, val),
    reset: () => store.clearAll()
  }
}

export default function App() {
  return (
    <Loads.Provider config={config}>
      ...
    </Loads.Provider>
  )
}

On a useLoads level

import * as Loads from 'react-loads';
import store from 'store';

const cacheProvider = {
  get: key => store.get(key),
  set: (key, val) => store.set(key, val),
  reset: () => store.clearAll()
}

export default function RandomDog() {
  const { ... } = Loads.useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog, { cacheProvider });
}

Preloading (experimental)

React Loads comes with the ability to eagerly preload your data. You can do so using the preload function.

const randomDogLoader = Loads.preload('randomDog', fetchRandomDog);

The preload function shares the same arguments as the useLoads function, however, preload is not a React Hook and shouldn't be called in your render function. Instead, use it inside event handlers, route preparation, or call it on first render.

The preload function will essentially fetch & cache your data in the background. It does not return any value apart from a useLoads hook. When the useLoads hook is invoked, it will read the data from the cache that was previously loaded by preload, and won't re-fetch your data. If no cached data exists, it will go ahead and fetch it.

const randomDogLoader = Loads.preload('randomDog', fetchRandomDog);

function RandomDog() {
  const { response } = randomDogLoader.useLoads({ suspense: true });
  return <img src={response.imgSrc} />;
}

function App() {
  return (
    <React.Suspense fallback={<div>Loading...</div>}>
      <RandomDog />
    </React.Suspense>
  )
}

See the CodeSandbox example

Render-as-you-fetch

The preload function is designed to implement the "render-as-you-fetch" pattern. Ideally, preload can be invoked when preparing your routes, or inside an event handler, where you can then use the useLoads function inside your component.

Basic example

Event handler example

Routing example

API

useLoads

const {
  response,
  error,
  load,
  isIdle,
  isPending,
  isPendingSlow,
  isReloading,
  isReloadingSlow,
  isResolved,
  isRejected,
  reset,
  state,
  isCached
} = useLoads(context, fn, config);

Parameters

context

string

A unique identifier for the request.

fn

function

A function that returns a promise to retrieve your data.

config

object | optional

A set of configuration options

Returns

response

any

Response from the resolved promise (fn).

error

any

Error from the rejected promise (fn).

load

function

Trigger to invoke fn.

isIdle

boolean

Returns true if the state is idle (fn has not been invoked).

isPending

boolean

Returns true if the state is pending (fn is in a pending state).

isPendingSlow

boolean

Returns true if the state is pending for longer than timeout milliseconds.

isReloading

boolean

Returns true if the state is reloading (fn is in a pending state & fn has already been invoked or cached).

isReloadingSlow

boolean

Returns true if the state is reloading for longer than timeout milliseconds.

isResolved

boolean

Returns true if the state is resolved (fn has been resolved).

isRejected

boolean

Returns true if the state is rejected (fn has been rejected).

reset

function

Function to reset the state & response back to an idle state.

state

string

State of the promise (fn).

isCached

boolean

Returns true if data exists in the cache.

useDeferredLoads

const {
  response,
  error,
  load,
  isIdle,
  isPending,
  isPendingSlow,
  isReloading,
  isReloadingSlow,
  isResolved,
  isRejected,
  reset,
  state,
  isCached,
  update
} = useDeferredLoads(context, fn, config);
// OR
} = useDeferredLoads(fn, config);

Parameters

context

string | optional

A unique identifier for the request. This is optional for useDeferredLoads.

fn

function

A function that returns a promise to retrieve your data.

config

object | optional

A set of configuration options

Returns

Same as useLoads

useCache

A hook which enables you to retrieve a record from the cache.

// Including `context` only
const randomDogRecord = useCache('randomDog');

// Including `context` & `variables`
const dogRecord = useCache('dog', { variables: [0] });

Parameters

context

The unique identifier of the record to retrieve.

variables

An array of variables (parameters).

Returns

response

any

Response of the cached record.

error

any

Error of the cached record.

state

any

State of the cached record.

useGetStates

A hook which composes a set of records, and gives you a singular state.

Without using useGetStates, you may run into situations like this:

const randomDogRecord = useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog);
const dogFriendsRecord = useLoads('dogFriends', fetchDogFriends);

<div>
  {(randomDogRecord.isPending || dogFriendsRecord.isPending) && 'Loading...'}
  {randomDogRecord.isResolved && dogFriendsRecord.isResolved && 'Loaded!'}
</div>

But, if you compose your records inside useGetStates, you can clean up your state variables:

const randomDogRecord = useLoads('randomDog', fetchRandomDog);
const dogFriendsLoader = useLoads('dogFriends', fetchDogFriends);

const { isPending, isResolved, isRejected } = useGetStates(randomDogRecord, dogFriendsRecord);

<Provider>

Set global configuration with the <Provider> component.

import * as Loads from 'react-loads';

const config = {
  cacheTime: 600000
}

export default function App() {
  return (
    <Loads.Provider config={config}>
      {/* ... */}
    </Loads.Provider>
  )
}

Props

config

Object

An object of configuration options

createResource

const resource = createResource(options);

Parameters

options.context

string

The context of the resource. Used to generate a cache key.

options.fn

function

A function that returns a promise to retrieve your data.

Any key can be an async function!

Any key you provide to the resource is an async function.

const dogsResource = createResource({
  context: 'dogs',
  fn: getDogs,
  create: createDog,
  foo: getDogFoo,
  bar: getDogBar,
  baz: getDogBaz
});

// In your function component - will invoke the `bar` async function in createResource:
dogsResource.bar.useLoads();

Returns

useLoads

A useLoads hook which can be invoked in your function component.

The arguments are a bit different to the standalone useLoads hook - it only optionally accepts a config object, and not a context or an async function (fn).

resource.useLoads(config)
useDeferredLoads

A useLoads hook which can be invoked in your function component.

The arguments are a bit different to the standalone useDeferredLoads hook - it only optionally accepts a config object, and not a context or an async function (fn).

resource.useDeferredLoads(config)
preload (experimental)

Same as the preload function, however only accepts a config object as it's only parameter.

resource.preload(config)

See the CodeSandbox example

preload (experimental)

const loader = preload(context, fn, config);

Parameters

context

string | optional

A unique identifier for the request. This is optional for useDeferredLoads.

fn

function

A function that returns a promise to retrieve your data.

config

object | optional

A set of configuration options

Returns

useLoads

A useLoads hook which can be invoked in your function component.

The arguments are a bit different to the standalone useLoads hook - it only optionally accepts a config object, and not a context or an async function (fn).

loader.useLoads(config)

Config

config = {
  cacheProvider,
  cacheStrategy,
  cacheTime,
  context,
  dedupingInterval,
  delay,
  defer,
  initialResponse,
  loadPolicy,
  onReject,
  onResolve,
  pollingInterval,
  pollWhenHidden,
  rejectRetryInterval,
  revalidateTime,
  revalidateOnWindowFocus,
  suspense,
  throwError,
  timeout,
  update,
  variables
}

cacheProvider

{ get: function(key), set: function(key, val), reset: function() }

Set a custom cache provider (e.g. local storage, session storate, etc). See external cache providers for an example.

cacheStrategy

string | Default: "context-and-variables"

The caching strategy for your loader to determine the cache key.

Available values:

  • "context-only"
    • Caches your data against the context key only.
  • "context-and-variables"
    • Caches your data against a combination of the context key & variables.

cacheTime

number | Default: 0

Time (in milliseconds) that the data remains in the cache. After this time, the cached data will be removed.

dedupingInterval

number | Default: 500

Interval (in milliseconds) that requests will be deduped in this time span.

delay

number | Default: 0

Time (in milliseconds) before the component transitions to the "pending" state upon invoking fn.

defer

boolean

If set to true, the async function (fn) won't be called automatically and will be deferred until later.

If defer is set to true, the initial state will be idle.

initialResponse

any

Set initial data for the request. Useful for SSR.

loadPolicy

string | Default: "cache-and-load"

A load policy allows you to specify whether or not you want your data to be resolved from the Loads cache and how it should load the data.

  • "cache-only": useLoads will only return data from the cache. It will not invoke the async function.

  • "cache-first": If a value for the loader already exists in the Loads cache, then useLoads will return the value that is in the cache, otherwise it will invoke the async function.

  • "cache-and-load": This is the default value and means that useLoads will return with the cached value if found, but regardless of whether or not a value exists in the cache, it will always invoke the async function.

  • "load-only": This means that useLoads will not return the cached data altogether, and will only return the data resolved from the async function.

onReject

function(error)

A hook that is invoked when the async function (fn) rejects.

onResolve

function(response)

A hook that is invoked when the async function (fn) resolves.

pollingInterval

number

If set, then useLoads will invoke the async function (fn) every x amount of seconds.

pollWhile

boolean | function(record)

If set, then useLoads will poll while the condition is truthy.

pollWhenHidden

boolean | Default: false

If truthy, then useLoads will continue to poll when the window is not focused.

rejectRetryInterval

number | function(count)

If set, and useLoads rejects, then useLoads will continue to try and resolve fn every x seconds. If a function is given, you can determine the interval time with that.

Example:

// Retry every 1000 milliseconds.
rejectRetryInterval: 1000

// Retry every "error count" * "2000 milliseconds".
rejectRetryInterval: count => count * 2000

revalidateTime

number | Default: 300000 (5 minutes)

Time that the data in the cache remains "fresh". After this time, data in the cache will be marked as "stale", meaning that the data will have to be reloaded on next invocation.

revalidateOnWindowFocus

boolean | Default: false

If truthy, useLoads will load the async function (fn), when the browser window is focused again.

suspense

boolean | Default: false

If truthy, this will enable React Suspense mode.

throwError

boolean | Default: false

If truthy and the async function (fn) rejects, then useLoads or load will throw the error.

timeout

number | Default: 5000 (5 seconds)

Number of milliseconds before the component transitions to the isPendingSlow or isReloadingSlow state. Set to 0 to disable.

Note: useLoads will still continue to try and resolve while in the isPendingSlow state

variables

Array<any>

An array of variables (parameters) to pass to your async function (fn).

Happy customers

  • "I'm super excited about this package" - Michele Bertoli
  • "Love the API! And that nested ternary-boolean example is a perfect example of how messy React code commonly gets without structuring a state machine." - David K. Piano
  • "Using case statements with React components is comparable to getting punched directly in your eyeball by a giraffe. This is a huge step up." - Will Hackett
  • "I used to get the shakes coding data fetch routines with React. Not anymore. Using react loads, I now achieve data fetching zen." - Claudia Nadalin
  • "After seeing https://twitter.com/dan_abramov/status/1039584557702553601?lang=en, we knew we had to change our loading lifecycles; React Loads was our saviour." - Zhe Wang

Acknowledgments

License

MIT © jxom

About

React Loads is a backend agnostic library to help with external data fetching & caching in your UI components.

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