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Socket iOS Client App & Python Server that turns an iPhone into a computer mouse
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README.md

mouselet

"mouselet" is an iOS Client App and TCP Server combination that allows an iPod touch/iPhone to control a computer's cursor like a mouse. To control the computer, start the server, connect to the server's IP through the iOS app, and then rotate the iDevice. The on-device gyroscope tracks and controls the mouse cursor. "mouselet" works best in networks with low latency.

How to Run

The iOS app was built with the iOS 8.1 SDK in Xcode 6, but with deployment target of iOS7.0, so any iOS version above 7.0 should work.

For the server, a working installation of python 2.x is required. To run the server, run either python server.py or chmod +x server.py && ./server.py depending on platform.

The server has been tested on:

  • Mac OS X (tested: 10.9.5 Mavericks)
  • Windows (tested: 7 & 8)
  • Linux (tested: Arch Linux)

The socket TCP server runs on port 22096.

On Linux variants, the respective Python 2 X Library (such as python2-xlib for Arch in the AUR) is needed also. Although the iOS app will probably not be in the App Store ($100 fee for iOS Developer Program), the Xcode source is hosted here, and can be compiled. I have also included an .ipa for jailbroken devices for those with AppSync. Use something like iFunBox to install.

Operation and Mouse Control

There are two numeric settings, one for the multiplier, which is how much a unit turn is multiplied into screen pixel distance. The second is the grip/friction, which is how quick the mouse velocity decreases over time. These can be adjusted with the 2 sliders.

There are 4 primary control styles which are more or less accurate, and an experimental style that is highly inaccurate. The first 4 depend on rotation rate of the iDevice, while the last style tries to calculate the distance the iDevice slides over a flat surface (hence the inaccuracy). All depend on double integration of the the respective acceleration.

  • Ball-Rolling Platform Style
  • Sideways Platform Style
  • Remote Control Style
  • Gravity Platform Style
  • Traditional Mouse (highly inaccurate, only implemented because a mouse is a mouse after all)

There is also a reset button that resets and centers the cursor in the middle of the screen.

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