A Clojure wrapper for LIBLINEAR, a linear support vector machine library
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README.markdown

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This is a Clojure wrapper around Benedikt Waldvogel's Java port of LIBLINEAR, a linear classifier that can handle problems with millions of instances and features. Essentially, it is a support vector machine optimized for classes that can be separated without projecting into some fancy-pants kernel space.

Deprecation notice

I wrote this library nearly 4 years ago, before I really understood Clojure. I'm not taking issues / pull requests against this library, since it needs a full redesign. Leaving it online just so you can see some examples of Clojure interop with a Java library. If the current API or performance is not what you need, your best bet is to just dig around and copy/paste what you need into your specific application.

cheers,

Kevin

Install

Add

[clj-liblinear "0.1.0"]

to the :dependencies vector in your projects.clj file.

Examples

Clj-liblinear takes maps as instances:

(use '[clj-liblinear.core :only [train predict]])
(let [train-data (concat
                  (repeatedly 300 #(hash-map :class 0 :f {:x (rand), :y (rand)}))
                  (repeatedly 300 #(hash-map :class 1 :f {:x (- (rand)), :y (- (rand))})))
      model (train
             (map :f train-data)
             (map :class train-data)
             :algorithm :l2l2)]

  [(predict model {:x (rand) :y (rand)})
   (predict model {:x (- (rand)) :y (- (rand))})])
;;=> [0 1]

If you are concerned only with occurrences (rather than continuous variables), you can use sets. These will be expanded into indicator variables for classification. For instance, you can easily do simple text classification based on word occurrence:

(use '[clj-liblinear.core :only [train predict]]
     '[clojure.string :only [split lower-case]])

(def facetweets [{:class 0 :text "grr i am so angry at my iphone"}
                 {:class 0 :text "this new movie is terrible"}
                 {:class 0 :text "disappointed that my maximum attention span is 10 seconds"}
                 {:class 0 :text "damn the weather sucks"}

                 {:class 1 :text "sitting in the park in the sun is awesome"}
                 {:class 1 :text "eating a burrito life is super good"}
                 {:class 1 :text "i love weather like this"}
                 {:class 1 :text "great new album from my favorite band"}])

(let [bags-of-words (map #(-> % :text (split #" ") set) facetweets)
      model         (train bags-of-words (map :class facetweets))]

  (map #(predict model (into #{} (split % #" ")))
       ["damn it all to hell!"
        "i love everyone"
        "my iphone is super awesome"
        "the weather is terrible this sucks"]))

;; => (0 1 1 0)

Thanks

The National Taiwan University Machine Learning Group for LIBLINEAR, and Benedikt Waldvogel his Java transliteration.

This project is sponsored by Keming Labs, a technical design studio specializing in data visualization.