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@@ -93,7 +93,7 @@ If Princes consider Laws as things impos'd on them, they have the appearance of
Our Trimmer thinketh that the King and Kingdom ought to be one Creature, not to be separated in their Political Capacity; and when either of them undertake to act a part, it is like the crawling of Worms after they are cut in pieces, which cannot be a lasting motion, the whole Creature not stirring at a time. If the Body have a dead Palsie, the Head cannot make it move; and God hath not yet delegated such a healing power to Princes, as that they can in a moment say to a Languishing People oppressed and in despair, Take up your Beds and walk.
-The Figure of a King, is so comprehensive and exalted a thing, that it is a kind of degrading him to lodge that power separately in his own Natural Person, which can never be safely or naturally great, but where the People are so united to him as to be Flesh of his Flesh, and Bone of his Bone; for when he is reduc'd to the single definition of a man, he sinketh into so low a Character, that it is a temptation upon Mens Allegiance, and an impairing that veneration which is necessary to preserve their Duty to him; whereas a Prince who is so joined to his people that they seem to be his Limbs, rather than his Subjects, Cloathed with Mercy and Justice rightly apply'din their several places, his Throne supported by Love as well as by Power, and the warm wishes of his devoted Subjects, like never-failing Incense, still ascending towards him, looketh so like the best Image we can frame to our selves of God Almighty, that men would have much ado not to fall down and worship him, and would be much more tempted to the Sin of Idolatry, than to that of Disobedience.
+The Figure of a King, is so comprehensive and exalted a thing, that it is a kind of degrading him to lodge that power separately in his own Natural Person, which can never be safely or naturally great, but where the People are so united to him as to be Flesh of his Flesh, and Bone of his Bone; for when he is reduc'd to the single definition of a man, he sinketh into so low a Character, that it is a temptation upon Mens Allegiance, and an impairing that veneration which is necessary to preserve their Duty to him; whereas a Prince who is so joined to his people that they seem to be his Limbs, rather than his Subjects, Cloathed with Mercy and Justice rightly apply'd in their several places, his Throne supported by Love as well as by Power, and the warm wishes of his devoted Subjects, like never-failing Incense, still ascending towards him, looketh so like the best Image we can frame to our selves of God Almighty, that men would have much ado not to fall down and worship him, and would be much more tempted to the Sin of Idolatry, than to that of Disobedience.
Our Trimmer is of Opinion, that there must be so much Dignity inseparably annexed to the Royal Function, as may be sufficient to secure it from insolence and contempt; and there must be Condescensions from the Throne, like kind showers from Heaven, that the Prince may look so much the more like God Almighty's Deputy upon Earth; for power without love hath a terrifying aspect, and the Worship which is paid to it is like that which the Indians give out of fear to Wild Beasts and Devils: he that feareth God only because there is an Hell, must wish there were no God; and he who feareth the King, only because he can punish, must wish there were no King; so that without a principle of Love, there can be no true Allegiance, and there must remain perpetual Seeds of Resistance against a power that is built upon such an unnatural Foundation, as that of fear and terrour. All force is a kind of foul-Play, and whosoever aimeth at it himself, doth by implication allow it to those he playeth with; so that there will be ever Matter prepared in the minds of People when they are provoked, and the Prince, to secure himself must live in the midst of his own Subjects, as if he were in a Conquer'd Country, raise Arms as if he were immediately to meet or resist an Invasion, and all this while sleep as unquietly from the fear of the Remedies, as he did before from that of the Disease; it being hard for him to forget, that more Princes have been destroyed by their Guards than by their People; and that even at the time when the Rule was Quod Principi placuit Lex esto, the Armies and Praetorian Bands which were the Instruments of that unruly Power, were frequently the means made use of to destroy them who had it. There will ever be this difference between God and his Vicegerents, that God is still above the Instruments he useth, and out of the danger of receiving hurt from them; but Princes can never lodge Power in any hands, which may not at some time turn it back upon them; for tho' it is possible enough for a King to have power to satisfy his Ambition; yet no Kingdom hath Money enough to satisfie the avarice of under-Workmen, who learn from that Prince who will exact more than belongeth to him, to expect from him much more than they deserve, and growing angry upon the first disappointment, they are the Devils which grow terrible to the Conjurers themselves who brought them up, and can't send them down again. And besides that there can be no lasting Radical Security, but where the Governed are satisfied with the Governours, it must be a Dominion very unpleasant to a Prince of an elevated Mind, to impose an abject and sordid servility, instead of receiving the willing Sacrifice of Duty and Obedience. The bravest Princes in all times, who were uncapable of any other kind of fear, have fear'd to grieve their own People; such a fear is a glory, and in this sense 'tis an infamy not to be a Coward: So that the mistaken Heroes who are void of this generous kind of fear, need no other aggravation to compleat their ill Characters.
@@ -131,7 +131,7 @@ There may be fresh Gales of asserting Liberty, without turning into such storms
Our Trimmer is a Friend to Parliaments, notwithstanding all their faults, and excesses, which of late have given such matter of Objection to them; he thinketh that tho' they may at some times be troublesome to Authority, yet they add the greatest strength to it under a wise Administration; he believeth no Government is perfect except a kind of Omnipotence reside in it, to exercise upon great Occasions: Now this cannot be obtained by force alone upon People, let it be never so great, there must be their consent too, or else a Nation moveth only by being driven, a sluggish and constrained Motion, void of that Life and Vigour which is necessary to produce great things, whereas the virtual Consent of the whole being included in their Representatives, and the King giving the sanction to the united sense of the People, every Act done by such an Authority, seemeth to be an effect of their choice as well as a part of their Duty; and they do, with an eagerness of which Men are uncapable whilst under a force, execute whatsoever is so enjoyned as their own Wills, better explained by Parliament, rather than from the terrour of incurring the Penalty of the Law for omiting it, and by means of this Political Omnipotence, what ever Sap or Juice there is in a Nation, may be to the last drop produced, whilst it riseth naturally from the Root; whereas all power exercis'd without consent, is like the giving Wounds and Gashes, and tapping a Tree at unseasonable Times, for the present occasion, which in a very little time must needs destroy it.
-Our Trimmer believeth, that by the advantage of our Situation, there can hardly any such sudden Disease come upon us, but that the King may have time enough left to consult with his Physicians in Parliament; pretences indeed may be made, but a real necessity so pressing, that no delay is to be admitted, is hardly to be imagin'd, and it will be neither easie to give an instance of any such thing for the time past, or reasonable to Presume it will ever happen for the time to come: but if that strange thing should fall out, our Trimmer is not so streightlac'd, as to let a Nation die, or to be stifled, rather than it should be help'd by any but the proper Officers. The Cases themselves will bring the Remedies along with them; and he is not afraid to allow that in order to its preservation, there is a hidden Power in Government, which would be lost if it was defined, a certain Mystery, by virtue of which a Nation may at some Critical times be secur'd from Ruine; but then it must be kept as a Mystery; it is rendred useless when touch 'd by unskilfull hands, and no Government ever had, or deserv'd to have that Power, which was so unwary as to anticipate their claim to it: Our Trimmer cannot help thinking it had been better, if the Triennial Act had been observed; because 'tis the Law, and he would not have the Crown, by such an Example, teach the Nation to break it; all irregularity is catching, it hath a Contagion in it, especially in an Age so much more enclin'd to follow ill Patterns than good ones.
+Our Trimmer believeth, that by the advantage of our Situation, there can hardly any such sudden Disease come upon us, but that the King may have time enough left to consult with his Physicians in Parliament; pretences indeed may be made, but a real necessity so pressing, that no delay is to be admitted, is hardly to be imagin'd, and it will be neither easie to give an instance of any such thing for the time past, or reasonable to Presume it will ever happen for the time to come: but if that strange thing should fall out, our Trimmer is not so streight-lac'd, as to let a Nation die, or to be stifled, rather than it should be help'd by any but the proper Officers. The Cases themselves will bring the Remedies along with them; and he is not afraid to allow that in order to its preservation, there is a hidden Power in Government, which would be lost if it was defined, a certain Mystery, by virtue of which a Nation may at some Critical times be secur'd from Ruine; but then it must be kept as a Mystery; it is rendred useless when touch 'd by unskilfull hands, and no Government ever had, or deserv'd to have that Power, which was so unwary as to anticipate their claim to it: Our Trimmer cannot help thinking it had been better, if the Triennial Act had been observed; because 'tis the Law, and he would not have the Crown, by such an Example, teach the Nation to break it; all irregularity is catching, it hath a Contagion in it, especially in an Age so much more enclin'd to follow ill Patterns than good ones.
He would have had a Parliament, because 'tis an Essential part of the Constitution, even without the Law, it being the only Provision in extraordinary Cases, in which there would be otherwise no Remedy, and there can be no greater Solecism in Government, than a failure of Justice.
@@ -174,9 +174,6 @@ Our Trimmer therefore could wish, that since notwithstanding the Laws which deny
Such a skilful hand as this is very Necessary in our Circumstances, and the Government by making no sort of Men entirely desperate, doth not only secure it self from Villainous attempts, but lay such a Foundation for healing and uniting Laws, when ever a Parliament shall meet, that the Seeds of Differences and Animosities between the several contending sides may (Heaven consenting) be for ever destroyed.
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The Trimmer's Opinion concerning the Papists.
To speak of Popery leadeth me into such a Sea of Matter, that it is not easie to forbear launching into it, being invited by such a fruitful Theme, and by a variety never to be exhausted; but to confine it to the present Subject, I will only say a short word of the Religion it self; of its influences here at this time; and of our Trimmer's Opinion in Relation to our manner of living with them.
@@ -197,7 +194,7 @@ But whither am I carried with this Contemplation? it is high time to return to m
You may be sure, that among all the sorts of Men who apply'd themselves to the King at his first coming home, for his Protection, the Papists were not the last, nor as they fain would have flattered themselves, the least welcome, having their past Sufferings, as well as their present Professions to recommend them; and there was something that looked like a particular Consideration of them, since it so happened, that the Indulgence promised to Dissenters at Breda, was carried on in such a manner, that the Papists were to divide with them; and tho' the Parliament, notwithstanding its Resignation to the Crown in all things, rejected with scorn and anger a Declaration fram'd for this purpose, yet the Birth and steps of it gave such an alarm, that Mens suspicions once raised, were not easily laid asleep again.
-To omit other things, the breach of the Tripple League, and the Dutch War with its appurtenances, carried Jealousies to the highest pitch imaginable, and fed the hopes of one Party and the fears of the Other to such a degree, that some Critical Revolutions were generally expected, when the ill success of that War, and the Sacrifice France thought fit to make of the Papists here to their own interest abroad, gave them another Check; and the Act of enjoyning the Test to all in Offices, was thought to be no ill Bargain to the Nation, tho' bought at the Price of 1200000 pound, and the Money apply'd to continue the War against the Dutch, than which nothing could be more unpopular or less approved. Notwithstanding these discouragements, Popery is a Plant that may be mowed down, but the Root will still remain, and in spite of the Laws, it will sprout up and grow again; especially if it should happen that there should be Men in Power, who in weeding it out of our Garden, will take care to Cherish and keep it alive; and tho' the Law for excluding them from Places of Trust was tolerably kept as to their outward Form, yet there were many Circumstances, which being improved by the quicksighted Malice of ill affected Men, did help to keep up the World in their suspicions, and to blow up Jealousies to such a height both in and out of Parliament, that the remembrance of them is very unpleasant, and the Example so extravagant, that it is to be hop'd nothing in our Age like it will be reattempted; but to come closer to the Case in question: in this Condition we stand with the Papists, what shall now be done, according to our Trimmer's Opinion, in order to the better Bearing this grievance, since as I have said before, there is no hopes of being entirely free from it; Papists we must have among us, and if their Religion keep them from bringing honey to the Hive, let the Government try at least by gentle means to take away the Sting from them. The first Foundation to be laid is, that a distinct Consideration is to be had of the Popish Clergy, who have such an eternal Interest against all accommodation, that it is a hopeless thing to propose any thing to them less than all; their Stomachs have been set for it ever since the Reformation, they have pinned themselves to a Principal that admits no mean: they believe Protestants will be damn'd, and therefore by an extraordinary Effect of Christian Charity, they would destroy one half of England that the other might be saved; then for this World, they must be in possession for God Almighty, to receive his Rents for him, not to accompt till the Day of Judgment, which is a good kind of Tenure, and ye cannot well blame the good Men, that will stir up the Laity to run any hazard in order to the getting them restored. What is it to the Priest, if the deluded Zealot undoeth himself in the Attempt? he singeth Masses as jollily, and with as good a Voice at Rome or St. Omers as ever he did; is a single Man, and can have no wants but such as may be easily supply'd, yet that he may not seem altogether insensible, or ungrateful to those that are his Martyrs, he is ready to assure their Executors, and if they please, will procure a Grant sub Annulo Piscatoris, that the good Man by being hanged, hath got a good Bargain, and sav'd the singeing of some hundred of years, which he would else have had in Purgatory. There's no Cure for this Order of Men, no Expedient to be propos'd, so that tho the utmost severity of the Laws against them may in some sort be mitigated, yet no Treaty can be made with Men who in this Case have left themselves no free Will, but are so muffled by Zeal, tyed by Vows, and kept up by such unchangeable Maxims of the Priesthood, that they are to be left as desperate Patients, and look'd upon as Men that will continue in an Eternal State of Hostility, till the Nation is entirely subdued to them. It is then only the Lay Papists that are capable of being treated with, and we are to examine of what temper they are, and what Arguments are the most likely to prevail upon them, and how far 'tis adviseable for the Government to be Indulgent to them; the Lay Papists generally keep their Religion, rather because they will not break Company with those of their Party, than out of any settled Zeal that hath Root in them; most of them do by the Mediation of the Priests Marry amongst one another, to keep up an Ignorant Position by hearing only one side; others by a mistake look upon it as they do upon Escutcheons, the more Antient Religion of the two; and as some Men of a good Pedigree will despise meaner Men, tho' never so much superior to them by Nature, so these undervalue Reformation as an Upstart, and think there is more Honour in supporting an old Errour, than in embracing what seemeth to them to be a new Truth; the Laws have made them Men of Pleasure, by excluding them from Publick Business, and it happeneth well they are so, since they will the more easily be perswaded by Arguments of Ease and Conveniency to them; they have not put off the Man in general, nor the Englishman in particular, those who in the late storm against them went into other Countries, tho they had all the Advantage that might recommend them to a good Reception, yet in a little time they chose to steal over again, and live here with hazard, rather than abroad with security. There is a Smell in our Native Earth, better than all the Perfumes in the East; there is something in a Mother, tho never so Angry, that the Children will more naturally trust Her, than the Studied Civilities of Strangers, let them be never so Hospitable; therefore 'tis not adviseable nor agreeing with the Rules of Governing Prudence, to provoke Men by hardships to forget that Nature, which else is sure to be of our side.
+To omit other things, the breach of the Tripple League, and the Dutch War with its appurtenances, carried Jealousies to the highest pitch imaginable, and fed the hopes of one Party and the fears of the Other to such a degree, that some Critical Revolutions were generally expected, when the ill success of that War, and the Sacrifice France thought fit to make of the Papists here to their own interest abroad, gave them another Check; and the Act of enjoyning the Test to all in Offices, was thought to be no ill Bargain to the Nation, tho' bought at the Price of 1200000 pound, and the Money apply'd to continue the War against the Dutch, than which nothing could be more unpopular or less approved. Notwithstanding these discouragements, Popery is a Plant that may be mowed down, but the Root will still remain, and in spite of the Laws, it will sprout up and grow again; especially if it should happen that there should be Men in Power, who in weeding it out of our Garden, will take care to Cherish and keep it alive; and tho' the Law for excluding them from Places of Trust was tolerably kept as to their outward Form, yet there were many Circumstances, which being improved by the quick-sighted Malice of ill affected Men, did help to keep up the World in their suspicions, and to blow up Jealousies to such a height both in and out of Parliament, that the remembrance of them is very unpleasant, and the Example so extravagant, that it is to be hop'd nothing in our Age like it will be reattempted; but to come closer to the Case in question: in this Condition we stand with the Papists, what shall now be done, according to our Trimmer's Opinion, in order to the better Bearing this grievance, since as I have said before, there is no hopes of being entirely free from it; Papists we must have among us, and if their Religion keep them from bringing honey to the Hive, let the Government try at least by gentle means to take away the Sting from them. The first Foundation to be laid is, that a distinct Consideration is to be had of the Popish Clergy, who have such an eternal Interest against all accommodation, that it is a hopeless thing to propose any thing to them less than all; their Stomachs have been set for it ever since the Reformation, they have pinned themselves to a Principal that admits no mean: they believe Protestants will be damn'd, and therefore by an extraordinary Effect of Christian Charity, they would destroy one half of England that the other might be saved; then for this World, they must be in possession for God Almighty, to receive his Rents for him, not to accompt till the Day of Judgment, which is a good kind of Tenure, and ye cannot well blame the good Men, that will stir up the Laity to run any hazard in order to the getting them restored. What is it to the Priest, if the deluded Zealot undoeth himself in the Attempt? he singeth Masses as jollily, and with as good a Voice at Rome or St. Omers as ever he did; is a single Man, and can have no wants but such as may be easily supply'd, yet that he may not seem altogether insensible, or ungrateful to those that are his Martyrs, he is ready to assure their Executors, and if they please, will procure a Grant sub Annulo Piscatoris, that the good Man by being hanged, hath got a good Bargain, and sav'd the singeing of some hundred of years, which he would else have had in Purgatory. There's no Cure for this Order of Men, no Expedient to be propos'd, so that tho the utmost severity of the Laws against them may in some sort be mitigated, yet no Treaty can be made with Men who in this Case have left themselves no free Will, but are so muffled by Zeal, tyed by Vows, and kept up by such unchangeable Maxims of the Priesthood, that they are to be left as desperate Patients, and look'd upon as Men that will continue in an Eternal State of Hostility, till the Nation is entirely subdued to them. It is then only the Lay Papists that are capable of being treated with, and we are to examine of what temper they are, and what Arguments are the most likely to prevail upon them, and how far 'tis adviseable for the Government to be Indulgent to them; the Lay Papists generally keep their Religion, rather because they will not break Company with those of their Party, than out of any settled Zeal that hath Root in them; most of them do by the Mediation of the Priests Marry amongst one another, to keep up an Ignorant Position by hearing only one side; others by a mistake look upon it as they do upon Escutcheons, the more Antient Religion of the two; and as some Men of a good Pedigree will despise meaner Men, tho' never so much superior to them by Nature, so these undervalue Reformation as an Upstart, and think there is more Honour in supporting an old Errour, than in embracing what seemeth to them to be a new Truth; the Laws have made them Men of Pleasure, by excluding them from Publick Business, and it happeneth well they are so, since they will the more easily be perswaded by Arguments of Ease and Conveniency to them; they have not put off the Man in general, nor the Englishman in particular, those who in the late storm against them went into other Countries, tho they had all the Advantage that might recommend them to a good Reception, yet in a little time they chose to steal over again, and live here with hazard, rather than abroad with security. There is a Smell in our Native Earth, better than all the Perfumes in the East; there is something in a Mother, tho never so Angry, that the Children will more naturally trust Her, than the Studied Civilities of Strangers, let them be never so Hospitable; therefore 'tis not adviseable nor agreeing with the Rules of Governing Prudence, to provoke Men by hardships to forget that Nature, which else is sure to be of our side.
When these Men by fair Usage are put again into their right Senses, they will have quite differing Reflections from those which Rigour and Persecution had raised in them: A Lay Papist will first consider his Abby-Lands, which notwithstanding whatever hath or can be alledged, must sink considerably in the Value, the moment that Popery prevails; and it being a disputable Matter, whether Zeal might not in a little time get the better of the Law in that case, a considering Man will admit that as an Argument to perswade him to be content with things as they are, rather than run this or any other hazard by Change, in which perhaps he may have no other Advantage, than that his now humble Confessor may be rais'd to a Bishoprick, and from thence look down superciliously upon his Patron, or which is worse, run to take Possession for God Almighty of his Abby, in such a manner as the usurping Landlord (as he will then be called) shall hardly be admitted to be so much as a Tenant to his own Lands, lest his Title should prejudge that of the Church, which will then be the Landlord; he will think what disadvantage 'tis to be looked upon as a separate Creature, depending upon a Foreign Interest and Authority, and for that reason, expos'd to the Jealousie and Suspicion of his Country-men; he will reflect what an Incunibrance it is to have his House a Pasture for hungry Priests to graze in, which have such a never-failing Influence upon the Foolish, which is the greatest part of every Man's Family, that a Man's Dominion, even over his own Children, is mangled, and divided, if not totally undermin'd by them; then to be subject to what Arbitrary Taxes the Popish Convocation shall impose upon him for the carrying on the Common Interest of that Religion, under Penalty of being mark'd out for half an Heretick by the rest of the Party; to have no share in Business, no opportunity of shewing his own Value to the World; to live at the best an useless, and by others to be thought a dangerous Member of the Nation where he is born, is a burthen to a generous Mind that cannot be taken off by all the Pleasure of a lazy unmanly life, or by the nauseous enjoyment of a dull Plenty, that produceth no food for the Mind, which will be considered in the first place by a Man that hath a Soul; when he shall think, that if his Religion, after his wading through a Sea of Blood, come at last to prevail, it would infinitely lessen, if not entirely destroy the Glory, Riches, Strength and Liberty of his own Country, and what a Sacrifice is this to make to Rome, where they are wise enough to wonder there should be such Fools in the World, as to venture, struggle, and contend, nay even die Martyrs for that which, should it succeed, would prove a Judgment instead of a Blessing to them; he will conclude that the advantages of throwing some of their Children back again to God Almighty when they have too many of them, are not equal to the Inconveniencies they may either feel or fear, by continuing their separation from the Religion established.
@@ -221,7 +218,7 @@ But the Lady had a more extended Commission than this and without doubt laid the
Thus we now stand, far from being Innocent Spectators of our Neighbours Ruine, and by a fatal mistake forgetting what a Certain Fore-runner it is to our own; and now it is time our Trimmer should tell something of his Opinion, upon this present State of things abroad; he first professeth to have no Biass, either for or against France, and that his thoughts are wholly directed by the Interest of his own Country; he alloweth, and hath read that Spain used the same Methods, when it was in its heighth, as France doth now, and therefore it is not Partiality that moveth him, but the just fear which all reasonable Men must be possess'd with, of an over-growing Power; Ambition is a devouring Beast, when it hath swallow'd one Province, instead of being cloyed, it hath so much the greater Stomach to another, and being fed, becometh still the more hungry; so that for the Confederates to expect a security from any thing but their own united strength, is a most miserable fallacy; and if they cannot resist the Incroachments of France by their Arms, it is in vain for them to dream of any other means of preservation; it would have the better grace, besides the saving so much Blood and Ruin, to give up all at once; make a Present of themselves, to appease this haughty Monarch, rather than be whisper'd, flattered, or cozened out of their liberty. Nothing is so soft as the first applications of a greater Prince, to engage a weaker, but that smiling Countenance is but a Vizard, it is not the true Face; for as soon as their turn is served, the Courtship flies to some other Prince or State, where the same part is to be acted over again; leaveth the old mistaken Friend to Neglect and Contempt, and like an insolent Lover to a Cast off Mistress, Reproaches her with that Infamy, of which he himself was the Author. Sweden, Bavaria, Palatine, &c. may by their Fresh Examples, teach other Princes what they are reasonably to expect, and what Snakes are hid under the Flowers the Court of France so liberally throweth upon them whilst they can be useful. The various Methods and deep Intrigues, with the differing Notes in several Countries, do not only give suspicion, but assurance that every thing is put in Practice, by which universal Monarchy may be obtain'd. Who can reconcile the withdrawing of his Troops from Luxenburg, in consideration of the War in Hungary, which was not then declared, and presently after encouraging the Turk to take Vienna, and consequently to destroy the Empire? Or who can think that the Persecution of the Poor Protestants of France, will be accepted of God, as an Atonement for hazarding the loss of the whole Christian Faith? Can he be thought in earnest, when he seem'd to be afraid of the Spaniards, and for that reason must have Luxenburg, and that he cannot be safe from Germany, unless he is in possession of Strasburg? All Injustice and Violence must in it self be grievous, but the aggravations of supporting 'em by false Arguments, and insulting Reasons, has something in it yet more provoking than the Injuries themselves; and the World hath ground enough to apprehend, from such a Method of arguing, that even their Senses are to be subdu'd as well as their Liberties. Then the variety of Arguments used by France in several Countries is very observable: In England and Denmark, nothing insisted on but the Greatness and Authority of the Crown; on the other side, the Great Men in Poland are commended, who differ in Opinion with the King, and they argue like Friends to the Privilege of the Dyet, against the separate Power of the Crown: In Sweden they are troubled that the King should have changed something there of late, by his single Authority, from the antient and settled Authority and Constitutions: At Ratisbone, the most Christian Majesty taketh the Liberties of all the Electors and free States into his Protection, and telleth them the Emperour is a dangerous Man, an aspiring Hero, that would infallibly devour them, if he was not at hand to resist him on their behalf; but above all in Holland, he hath the most obliging tenderness for the Commonwealth, and is in such disquiets, lest it should be invaded by the Prince of Orange, that they can do no less in gratitude, than undo themselves when he bids them, to show how sensible they are of his excessive good Nature; yet in spight of all these Contradictions, there are in the World such refin'd States-men, as will upon their Credit affirm the following Paradoxes to be real truth; first that France alone is sincere and keepeth its Faith, and consequently that it is the only Friend we can rely upon; that the King of France, of all Men living, hath the least mind to be a Conqueror; that he is a sleepy, tame Creature, void of all Ambition, a poor kind of a Man, that hath no farther thoughts than to be quiet; that he is charm'd by his Friendship to us; that it is impossible he should ever do us hurt, and therefore tho Flanders was lost, it would not in the least concern us; that he would fain help the Crown of England to be absolute, which would be to take pains to put it into a condition to oppose him, as it is, and must be our Interest, as long as he continueth in such an overbalancing Power and Greatness.
-Such a Creed as this, if once received, might prepare our belief for greater things, and as he that taught Men to eat a Dagger, began first with a Pen knife; so if we can be prevailed with to digest the smaller Mistakes, we may at last make our stomachs strong enough for that of Transubstantiation. Our Trimmer cannot easily be converted out of his senses by these State Sophisters, and yet he hath no such peevish Obstinacy as to reject all Correspondence with France because we ought to be apprehensive of the too great power of it; he would not have the kings Friendship to the Confederates extended to the involving him in any unreasonable or dangerous Engagements, neither would he have him lay aside the consideration of his better establishment at home, out of his excessive Zeal to secure his Allies abroad; but sure there might be a Mean between these two opposite Extreams, and it may be wished that our Friendship with France should at least be so bounded, that it may consist with the humour as well as the Interest of England. There is no Woman but hath her fears of contracting too near an intimacy with a much greater Beauty, because it exposeth her too often to a Comparison that is not advantageous to her; and sure it may become a Prince to be as jealous of his Dignity, as a Lady can be of her good looks, and to be as much out of Countenance, to be thought an humble Companion to so much a greater Power. To be always seen in an ill Light, to be so darkned by the brightness of a greater Star, is somewhat mortifying; and when England might ride Admiral at the head of the Confederates, to look like the Kitching- Yacht to the Grand Louis, is but a scurvy Figure for us to make in the Map of Christendom', it would rise upon our Trimmer's stomach, if ever (which God forbid) the power of calling and intermitting Parliaments here should be transferred to the Crown of France, and that all the opportunities of our own settlements at home should give way to their Projects abroad, and that our Interests should be so far sacrific'd to our Compliance, that all the Omnipotence of France can never make us full amends for it. In the mean time, he shrinketh at the dismal prospect he can by no means drive away from his thoughts, that when France hath gathered all the fruit arising from our Mistakes, and that wecan bear no more with them, they will cut down the Tree and throw it into the fire. All this while, some Superfine StatesMen, to comfort us, would fain perswade the World that this or that accident may save us, and for all that is or ought to be dear to us, would have us to rely wholly upon Chance, not considering that Fortune is Wisdoms Creature, and that God Almighty loves to be on the Wisest as well as the Strongest side; therefore this is such a miserable shift, such a shameful Evasion, that they would be laught to death for it, if the ruining Consequence of this Mistake did not more dispose Men to rage, and a detestation of it.
+Such a Creed as this, if once received, might prepare our belief for greater things, and as he that taught Men to eat a Dagger, began first with a Pen knife; so if we can be prevailed with to digest the smaller Mistakes, we may at last make our stomachs strong enough for that of Transubstantiation. Our Trimmer cannot easily be converted out of his senses by these State Sophisters, and yet he hath no such peevish Obstinacy as to reject all Correspondence with France because we ought to be apprehensive of the too great power of it; he would not have the kings Friendship to the Confederates extended to the involving him in any unreasonable or dangerous Engagements, neither would he have him lay aside the consideration of his better establishment at home, out of his excessive Zeal to secure his Allies abroad; but sure there might be a Mean between these two opposite Extreams, and it may be wished that our Friendship with France should at least be so bounded, that it may consist with the humour as well as the Interest of England. There is no Woman but hath her fears of contracting too near an intimacy with a much greater Beauty, because it exposeth her too often to a Comparison that is not advantageous to her; and sure it may become a Prince to be as jealous of his Dignity, as a Lady can be of her good looks, and to be as much out of Countenance, to be thought an humble Companion to so much a greater Power. To be always seen in an ill Light, to be so darkned by the brightness of a greater Star, is somewhat mortifying; and when England might ride Admiral at the head of the Confederates, to look like the Kitching Yacht to the Grand Louis, is but a scurvy Figure for us to make in the Map of Christendom', it would rise upon our Trimmer's stomach, if ever (which God forbid) the power of calling and intermitting Parliaments here should be transferred to the Crown of France, and that all the opportunities of our own settlements at home should give way to their Projects abroad, and that our Interests should be so far sacrific'd to our Compliance, that all the Omnipotence of France can never make us full amends for it. In the mean time, he shrinketh at the dismal prospect he can by no means drive away from his thoughts, that when France hath gathered all the fruit arising from our Mistakes, and that we can bear no more with them, they will cut down the Tree and throw it into the fire. All this while, some Superfine States-Men, to comfort us, would fain perswade the World that this or that accident may save us, and for all that is or ought to be dear to us, would have us to rely wholly upon Chance, not considering that Fortune is Wisdoms Creature, and that God Almighty loves to be on the Wisest as well as the Strongest side; therefore this is such a miserable shift, such a shameful Evasion, that they would be laught to death for it, if the ruining Consequence of this Mistake did not more dispose Men to rage, and a detestation of it.
Our Trimmer is far from Idolatry in other things, in one thing only he cometh near it, his Country is in some degree his Idol; he doth not Worship the Sun, because 'tis not peculiar to us, it rambles about the World, and is less kind to us than others; but for the Earth of England, tho perhaps inferior to that of many places abroad, to him there is Divinity in it, and he would rather dye, than see a spire of English Grass trampled down by a Foreign Trespasser: He thinketh there are a great many of his mind, for all plants are apt to taste of the Soyl in which they grow, and we that grow here, have a Root that produceth in us a Stalk of English Juice, which is not to be changed by grafting or foreign infusion; and I do not know whether any thing less will prevail, than the Modern Experiment, by which the Blood of one Creature is transmitted into another; according to which, before the French blood can be let into our Bodies, every drop of our own must be drawn out of them.

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