A guide on how to do mundane programming to become a non-mundane programmer
HTML Python CSS JavaScript
Switch branches/tags
Nothing to show
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Failed to load latest commit information.
_data
_includes
_layouts
articles
assets
code
examples
files
projects
.gitignore
README.md
_config.yml
about.md
feed.xml
index.html
todoexamples.md

README.md

Mundane Programming

Session agenda

live site


blah blah blah filler

Scripts used

ghiculescu/jekyll-table-of-contents

TODO list

Functionality

  • snippets/code-snippet.html

General

  • Add author bios
  • Write project page templates
  • Add text, links in footer
  • A better header?
  • A favicon?
  • XML/JSON feed of posts?

Pages

  • About page is not good
  • Convert Word docx to HTML
  • Regex practice
  • Text editor suggestions
  • Add context to Travis's Craigslist example

mundaneprogramming.github.io

A guide on how to do mundane programming to become a non-mundane programmer.

This is a companion site for the SRCCON 2015 session, "Mundane Programming" as facilitated by Dan Nguyen and Travis Swicegood

From the session blurb:

Programming creates so many technical and creative inventions that it's natural for aspiring programmers to dream of big projects in the cloud. But this ambition ignores the actual goal of programming, which is almost completely about making machines do mundane work. And it is counterproductive to learning how to program, which requires consistent practice as in every other form of literacy and art.

So this session will be about mundane programming. Programming not to be the next Zuckerberg, or to get a better job 3 months from now, but to make today or just the next ten minutes more enjoyable. Instead of focusing specifically on how to code, we'll expand upon the reasons of why we code (though seeing is often believing when it comes to code, so feel free to bring both ideas and Gists). And we'll trim the personal prerequisites of programming, which don't include being an entrepreneur, having a profitable idea, building a website, contributing to open source, or changing the world or your career. Programming can be learned, and done, with a willingness to learn and a wide variety of small problems to practice upon.

Here's a Google spreadsheet of some example tasks.