a (K8s) CNI plugin to create arbitrary virtual network topologies
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README.md

meshnet CNI

meshnet is a (K8s) CNI plugin to create arbitrary network topologies out of point-to-point links with the help of koko. Heavily inspired by Ratchet-CNI, kokonet and Multus.

Architecture

The goal of this plugin is to interconnect pods via direct point-to-point links according to some pre-define topology. To do that, the plugin uses two types of links:

  • veth - used to connect two pods running on the same host
  • vxlan - used to connected two pods running on different hosts

Topology information, represented as a list of links per pod, is stored in a private etcd cluster in the following format:

[ {  "uid":            21,
     "peer_pod":     "pod3",
     "local_intf":   "eth2",
     "local_ip":     "23.23.23.2/24",
     "peer_intf":    "eth2",
     "peer_ip":      "23.23.23.3/24" }]

The plugin configuration file specifies the connection details of the private etcd cluster, as well as the delegate plugin configuration, which will setup the first (eth0) interface of the pod.

{
  "cniVersion": "0.1.0",
  "name": "my_network",       <--- Arbitrary name
  "type": "meshnet",          <--- The name of CNI plugin binary
  "etcd_host": "10.97.209.1", <--- IP address of etcd service 
  "etcd_port": "2379",
  "delegate": {               <--- Plugin responsible for the first interface (eth0)
    "name": "dind0",
    "bridge": "dind0",
    "type": "bridge",
    "isDefaultGateway": true,
    "ipMasq": true,
    "ipam": {
      "type": "host-local",
      "subnet": "10.244.1.0/24",
      "gateway": "10.244.1.1"
    }
  }
}

The plugin consists of three main components:

  • etcd - a private cluster storing topology information and runtime pod metadata (e.g. pod IP address and NetNS)
  • meshnet - a CNI binary reponsible for pod's network configuration
  • meshnetd - a daemon reponsible for Vxlan link configuration updates

architecture

Below is the order of operation of the plugin from the perspective of kube-node-1:

  1. etcd cluster gets populated with the topology information
  2. pod-1/pod-2 come up, local kubelet calls the meshnet binary for each pod to setup their networking
  3. meshnet binary delegates the ADD command to the "master" plugin specified in the CNI configuration file, which connectes interface eth0

Note that eth0 is always setup by one of the existing CNI plugins. It is used to provide external connectivity to and from the pod

  1. meshnet binary updates the etcd cluster with pod's metadata (namespace filepath and primary IP address)
  2. meshnet binary retrieves the list of links and looks up peer pod's metadata in etcd to compare its own IP address to the primary IP address of each peer
  3. If the peer is on the same node, it calls koko to setup a veth link between the two pods
  4. If the peer is on the remote node, it does two things:
    7.1 It calls koko to setup a local vxlan link
    7.2 It makes an HTTP PUT call to the remote node's meshnet daemon, specifying this link's metadata (e.g. VTEP IP and VNI)
  5. Upon receipt of this information, remote node's meshnetd idepmotently updates the local vxlan link, i.e. it creates a new link, updates the existing link if there's a change or does nothing if the link attributes are the same.

Local Demo

Note: go 1.11 or later is required

Clone this project and build a local dind 3-node kubernetes cluster

./reinit.sh

Deploy the private etcd cluster

export PATH="$HOME/.kubeadm-dind-cluster:$PATH"
kubectl create -f utils/etcd.yml

Build meshnet and meshnetd. The scripts also builds a Docker image and requires a dockerhub username to be provided to push the image to the docker hub.

Note: the first time the command runs, it pulls down all the dependencies specified in go.mod, which may take a few minutes to complete

./build.sh <dockerhub_username>

Deploy meshnet plugin

kubectl create -f kube-meshnet.yml

Upload the topology information to etcd cluster (in this case 3 pods connected as triangle)

tests/upload-topology.sh

Create 3 test pods (2 pods on 1 node and 1 pod on another)

cat tests/2node.yml | kubectl create -f -

Check that all pods are running

kubectl --namespace=default get pods -o wide  |  grep pod
pod1                                  1/1       Running   0          3m        10.244.2.31   kube-node-1
pod2                                  1/1       Running   0          3m        10.244.2.32   kube-node-1
pod3                                  1/1       Running   0          3m        10.244.1.15   kube-master

Test connectivity between pods

kubectl exec pod1 -- sudo ping -c 1 12.12.12.2
kubectl exec pod2 -- sudo ping -c 1 23.23.23.3
kubectl exec pod3 -- sudo ping -c 1 13.13.13.1

Destroy 3 test pods

cat tests/2node.yml | kubectl delete --grace-period=0 --force -f -

Installation

Generic instructions

The following instructions are executed from a node with kubectl access to kubernetes cluster.

Step 1 - Install private etcd cluster

kubectl create -f utils/etcd.yml

Step 2 - Install meshnet CNI plugin

kubectl create -f kube-meshnet.yml

Step 3 - Update CNI configuration file

Meshnet CNI configuration file requires two updates.

{
  "cniVersion": "0.1.0",
  "name": "meshnet_network",
  "type": "meshnet",
  "etcd_host": "10.103.144.119",   <-- Update 2
  "etcd_port": "2379",
  "delegate": {}                   <-- Update 1
}

First, ensure that the delegate key contains a valid CNI configuration of an existing plugin (e.g. bridge, flannel, weave). The following is an example for flannel:

  "delegate": {
    "type": "flannel",
    "delegate": {
      "forceAddress": true,
      "hairpinMode": true,
      "isDefaultGateway": true
    }
  }

Second, update etcd host to point to the previously deployed etcd cluster. The following command shows a Cluster-IP for etcd-client service:

$ kubectl get service etcd-client
NAME          TYPE       CLUSTER-IP       EXTERNAL-IP   PORT(S)          AGE
etcd-client   NodePort   10.103.144.119   <none>        2379:32379/TCP   15m

Kubespray instructions

(Optional) Step 1 - Install 4-node K8s cluster using Kubespray

These instructions will install k8s with flannel as default CNI plugin and allow any insecure Docker registries.

git clone https://github.com/kubernetes-incubator/kubespray.git &&  cd kubespray

sudo pip install -r requirements.txt

cp -rfp inventory/sample/ inventory/mycluster

declare -a IPS=(10.83.30.251 10.83.30.252 10.83.30.253 10.83.30.254)

CONFIG_FILE=inventory/mycluster/hosts.ini python3 contrib/inventory_builder/inventory.py ${IPS[@]}

sed -i 's/calico/flannel/g' inventory/mycluster/group_vars/k8s-cluster/k8s-cluster.yml

echo -e "docker_insecure_registries:\n   - 0.0.0.0/0" >> inventory/mycluster/group_vars/all/docker.yml

ansible-playbook -i inventory/mycluster/hosts.ini --become --become-user=root -u core cluster.yml

Step 2 - Install hosted meshnet service on top of K8s cluster

cp inventory/mycluster/hosts.ini ~/meshnet-cni/kubespray/ && cd ~/meshnet-cni/kubespray/
./build.sh

(Optional) Step 3 - Use k8s-topo to orchestrate network topologies

Login the K8s master node and

git clone https://github.com/networkop/k8s-topo.git && cd k8s-topo

Deploy k8s-topo pod

kubectl create -f kube-k8s-topo.yml

Login the k8s-topo pod

kubectl exec -it k8s-topo sh

Create a random 20-node network topology

./examples/builder/builder 20 0
Total number of links generated: 19

Create the topology inside K8s

./bin/k8s-topo --create examples/builder/random.yml 

Optionally, you can generate a D3.js network topology graph

./bin/k8s-topo --graph examples/builder/random.yml 

View the generated topology graph at http://<any_k8s_cluster_node_ip>:32080

Verify that the topology has been deployed (from the master node)

kubectl get pods -o wide | grep qrtr
qrtr-1     1/1     Running   0          11s     10.233.65.231   node3   <none>
qrtr-10    1/1     Running   0          11s     10.233.65.234   node3   <none>
qrtr-11    1/1     Running   0          10s     10.233.66.246   node4   <none>

Login the first node and verify connectivity to every other loopback

$ qrtr-1
/ # for i in `seq 1 20`; do ping -c 1 -W 2 198.51.100.$i|grep from; done
64 bytes from 198.51.100.1: seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.052 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.2: seq=0 ttl=58 time=0.428 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.3: seq=0 ttl=63 time=0.274 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.4: seq=0 ttl=62 time=0.271 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.5: seq=0 ttl=58 time=0.528 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.6: seq=0 ttl=58 time=0.560 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.7: seq=0 ttl=59 time=0.502 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.8: seq=0 ttl=57 time=0.470 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.9: seq=0 ttl=57 time=0.564 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.10: seq=0 ttl=61 time=0.267 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.11: seq=0 ttl=56 time=0.544 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.12: seq=0 ttl=63 time=0.280 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.13: seq=0 ttl=62 time=0.358 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.14: seq=0 ttl=61 time=0.380 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.15: seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.154 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.16: seq=0 ttl=60 time=0.379 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.17: seq=0 ttl=59 time=0.356 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.18: seq=0 ttl=59 time=0.307 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.19: seq=0 ttl=60 time=0.260 ms
64 bytes from 198.51.100.20: seq=0 ttl=58 time=0.466 ms

Destroy the topology

./bin/k8s-topo --destroy examples/builder/random.yml