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new class request: diaphragmaticus muscle #1229

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ANiknejad opened this Issue Jun 27, 2016 · 1 comment

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ANiknejad commented Jun 27, 2016

hi Chris,

'crocodilians lack a muscular structure homologous or analogous to the mammalian diaphragm and a combination of three other muscular mechanisms power ventilation; namely, the intercostal, abdominal and diaphragmaticus muscles...The diaphragmaticus muscle of crocodilians is not homologous to the mammalian diaphragm (Gans, 1971; Klein and Owerkowicz, 2006) and its main function may have been non-respiratory (Uriona and Farmer, 2008) as crocodilian ancestors became secondarily adapted to life in water (Seymour et al., 2004). '

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=22323207

Also

'Crocodilians have a fascinating and complex way of breathing. Like other amniotes they use costal ventilation, but inspiration can be supplemented by pelvic aspiration and a form of diaphragmatic ventilation (Fig. 1) that is not homologous with mammalian diaphragmatic breathing (Naifeh et al., 1970; Gans and Clark, 1976; Farmer and Carrier, 2000). It is unclear when the crocodilian diaphragmatic muscle evolved or why crocodilians need several different mechanisms to supplement inspiration. '

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=19328664

Many thanks,
Cheers,

Anne

ANiknejad referenced this issue in BgeeDB/anatomical-similarity-annotations Jun 27, 2016

@cmungall cmungall closed this in 6132d29 Jul 7, 2016

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ANiknejad Jan 16, 2018

hi Chris,

sounds like we should relax 'diaphragmaticus muscle' definition, what do you think?

[Term]
id: UBERON:0036071
name: diaphragmaticus muscle
namespace: uberon
def: "A skeletal muscle found in crocodilians that is analogous to the diaphragm of mammals" [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22323207, https://github.com/obophenotype/uberon/issues/1229]

https://books.google.ch/books?isbn=0444634959
'Turtles and crocodilians have a diaphragmaticus muscle. However, neither the diaphragmaticus muscle of turtles, nor the diaphragmaticus muscle of crocodiles, nor the mammalian diaphragm are homologous structures.

https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms6211
the homology of the ‘M. diaphragmaticus,’ a name proposed by Bojanus5 and used by subsequent authors6,10,14, is problematic. Unfortunately, muscles with identical names but doubtful homology have been described in turtles, mammals and crocodilians6 thus confounding the evolutionary origin of the muscle in turtles. The M. diaphragmaticus of mammals and that of crocodilians are caudal to the lungs, whereas the ‘M. diaphragmaticus’ of turtles is cranial and ventral to the lungs, and there is widespread agreement that these muscles are not homologous across the three groups

ANiknejad commented Jan 16, 2018

hi Chris,

sounds like we should relax 'diaphragmaticus muscle' definition, what do you think?

[Term]
id: UBERON:0036071
name: diaphragmaticus muscle
namespace: uberon
def: "A skeletal muscle found in crocodilians that is analogous to the diaphragm of mammals" [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22323207, https://github.com/obophenotype/uberon/issues/1229]

https://books.google.ch/books?isbn=0444634959
'Turtles and crocodilians have a diaphragmaticus muscle. However, neither the diaphragmaticus muscle of turtles, nor the diaphragmaticus muscle of crocodiles, nor the mammalian diaphragm are homologous structures.

https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms6211
the homology of the ‘M. diaphragmaticus,’ a name proposed by Bojanus5 and used by subsequent authors6,10,14, is problematic. Unfortunately, muscles with identical names but doubtful homology have been described in turtles, mammals and crocodilians6 thus confounding the evolutionary origin of the muscle in turtles. The M. diaphragmaticus of mammals and that of crocodilians are caudal to the lungs, whereas the ‘M. diaphragmaticus’ of turtles is cranial and ventral to the lungs, and there is widespread agreement that these muscles are not homologous across the three groups

@ANiknejad ANiknejad reopened this Jan 16, 2018

ANiknejad added a commit to BgeeDB/anatomical-similarity-annotations that referenced this issue Jan 16, 2018

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