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README.md

nebulous

OpenNebula stuff for managing Jenkins and Bamboo agent pools

Development

Just run vagrant up and you will get a ruby version for the vagrant user along with all the bundled gems in /home/vagrant.

Packaging

The packager directory also has a Vagrantfile that will compile ruby from source, put it in /opt, clone this repo, bundle all the gems, move it to /opt, and finally package the whole thing as an RPM. Everything gets installed to /opt. The ruby version is in /opt/ruby-2.2.2 and the code is in /opt/nebulous.

Deployment

Make sure you have ~/.one/one_auth and ~/.one/one_endpoint containing username/password and XML-RPC endpoint respectively. If you are using secure configuration then make sure you also have the public key for decrypting the secure values. I usually put it in ~/.ssh/config.pub. The rest of it is just a matter of making sure your configurations and provisioners line up properly. You can keep everything in one repo or two. It doesn't really matter. Just make sure they are accessible somewhere on the file system so that lib/runner.rb can read them.

Since there is a lot of ssh shelling out involved the assumption is that the public key of the user running lib/runner.rb has their ssh key set up in OpenNebula so that root access with that key is possible. If this is not set up then the VMs will come up but provisioning will fail.

As for the actual code just use vagrant-packager to generate an rpm and then install it with rpm -i.

Configuration

Configuration is a very simple YAML file. Currently there are two types of configurations, jenkins and bamboo. The only difference is really a few key-value pairs for username/password and maaster server endpoint.

Bamboo

To configure a bamboo pool you just need to fill in the following template

name: 'nebulous-bamboo'
type: 'bamboo'
count: 10
template_name: 'some template name'
provision:
- command: 'uptime'
type: 'inline'
- command: 'echo hi'
type: 'inline'
- command: 'touch i-was-here'
type: 'inline'
- path: '/root/provisioners/bamboo.sh'
arguments: ['https://bamboo-master', '${user}', '${password}']
type: 'script'
bamboo: 'https://hh-bamboo-master/'
bamboo_username: '${user}'
bamboo_password: '${password}'

Most of the above should be self-explanatory but here is the description of the keys just in case

  • name - Name of the pool. The VMs in the pool will have a hash appended to the name just so the DNS entries end up being unique.
  • type - Currently only 'bamboo' or 'jenkins'. So we know how to do registration with the master once the VM is ready.
  • count - Number of VMs in the pool.
  • template_name: Name of the template in OpenNebula that is used to instantiate the VMs.
  • provision - List of provisioning stages. Currently supported types are inline, script, directory, tar. Look in lib/stages.rb for complete list.
  • bamboo - IP address or HTTP(s) endpoint of master bamboo server.
  • bamboo_username - Username of administrator account. We need this to scrape various endpoints for controlling agents.
  • bamboo_password - The password for the administrator account.

Some values should remain secret and for those cases we use the travis-ci model of encrypting values with RSA keys and using secure: ${encrypted_value} as the value. Unlike travis-ci the workflow is not automatic and you need to drop into irb to do the encryption and Base64 encoding.

Jenkins

Same as above with name changes for some of the keys

name: 'nebulous-jenkins'
type: 'jenkins'
count: 10
template_name: 'some template'
provision:
- type: "script"
path: "/root/provisioners/jenkins.sh"
arguments: []
jenkins: 'https://ivy/jenkins'
jenkins_username: '${user}'
jenkins_password: '${password}'
credentials_id: '2dfc58d2-9d2e-49dd-849b-4eb1a4933e54'
private_key_path: '${id_rsa}'

Provisioner types

There are 4 types of provisioners currently and they all pretty much work the same way. Each provisioner is defined by a path to a directory, a shell script, a tar file, or in the case of the inline provisioner just a string that will be executed directly.

Inline

Just define the type as 'inline' and fill in the command:

type: 'inline'
command: 'uptime'

Script

Define the type as 'script' and fill in the path to the script and provide arguments if any:

type: 'script'
path: '/some/path/script.sh'
arguments:
- 'arg1'
- 'arg2'
- 'arg3'

Directory

Define the type as 'directory' and fill the path to the directory and the arguments as in the script type:

type: 'directory'
path: '/some/directory'
arguments:
- 'arg1'
- 'arg2'
- 'arg3'

You might be wondering how a directory is executed, well it's not. The assumption is that the directory has a shell script called setup.sh that will be executed and the arguments are passed to that shell script. The actual operational semantics is to scp the directory to the VM, cd into the directory, and finally run setup.sh with the given arguments.

Tar

Define the type as 'tar' and fill in the path and arguments as above. The operational semantics is the same as for the directory except there is one extra step where the tar file is untarred. The assumption is that there is setup.sh that will do the work.

type: 'tar'
path: '/some/path/bundle.tar'
arguments:
- 'arg1'
- 'arg2'
- 'arg3'

Secure Values

This was shamelessly stolen from how the travis cli does things. You need an RSA key pair. Use one to encrypt and the other to decrypt. Since we are not sending messages to third parties and this is all meant for internal use it doesn't really matter which key you use to encrypt or decrypt. Since the public key can be derived from the private key but not vice-versa I use the private key to encrypt and the public key to decrypt so only the public key needs to be on the node where nebulous is running.

Encrypting Values

No utility yet just a snippet of IRB code:

require 'openssl'
require 'base64'
key = OpenSSL::PKey::RSA.new(File.read('nebulous_private_key'))
encrypted_value = Base64.encode64(key.private_encrypt("super sekrit string")).gsub("\n", '')

The encrypted value would then be used for any "secure" values in the pool configuration yaml file, eg,

name: 'nebulous-jenkins'
type: 'jenkins'
count: 10
template_name: 'some template'
provision:
- type: "script"
path: "/root/provisioners/jenkins.sh"
arguments: []
jenkins: 'https://ivy/jenkins'
jenkins_username: '${user}'
jenkins_password:
  secure: '${encrypted_value}'
credentials_id: '2dfc58d2-9d2e-49dd-849b-4eb1a4933e54'
private_key_path: '${id_rsa}'

This allows you to safely check the password into your git repo, since it's encrypted.

Decrypting Values

Pretty much same as above but you pass in the public key and base64 decode the encrypted value before passing it in. This is what happens when the configuration is loaded so this snippet is just for making sure you performed the encryption properly

require 'openssl'
require 'base64'
key = OpenSSL::PKey::RSA.new(File.read('config.pub')
decrypted_value = key.public_decrypt(Base64.decode64(base64_encrypted_value))