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badfish

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Badfish

Badfish is a Redfish-based API tool for managing bare-metal systems via the Redfish API

You can read more about badfish at the QUADS website.

Scope

Right now Badfish is focused on managing Dell, SuperMicro and HPE systems, but can potentially work with any system that supports the Redfish API. Functionality may vary depending on the vendor Redfish implementation.

We're mostly concentrated on programmatically enforcing interface/device boot order to accommodate TripleO based OpenStack and OpenShift deployments while simultaneously allowing easy management and provisioning of those same systems via The Foreman. Badfish can be useful as a general standalone, unified vendor IPMI/OOB tool however as support for more vendors is added.

Features

  • Toggle and save a persistent interface/device boot order on remote systems
  • Perform one-time boot to a specific interface, mac address or device listed for PXE booting
  • Enforce a custom interface boot order
  • Check current boot order
  • Reboot host
  • Reset iDRAC
  • Clear iDRAC job queue
  • Revert to factory settings
  • Check/set SRIOV
  • Get firmware inventory of installed devices supported by iDRAC
  • Check/ummount virtual media en-masse across a set of systems
  • Obtain limited hardware information (CPU, Memory, Interfaces)
  • Bulk actions via plain text file with list of hosts for parallel execution
  • Logging to a specific path
  • Containerized Badfish image

Requirements

  • (Dell) iDRAC7,8,9 or newer
  • (Dell) Firmware version 2.60.60.60 or higher
  • iDRAC administrative account
  • Python >= 3.6 or podman as a container.
  • python3-devel >= 3.6 (If using standalone below).

Setup

Badfish Standalone CLI

git clone https://github.com/redhat-performance/badfish && cd badfish
python setup.py build
python setup.py install --prefix ~/.local

NOTE:

  • This will allow Badfish to be called from the terminal via the badfish command
  • This requires python3-devel if you see errors about missing Python.h.
  • This is ideal for a non-root user, otherwise you'll get badfish in /root/.local/bin/badfish for example.
  • If you have problems running as root you will need to add whatever you set in --prefix= to your $PATH by adding something like the following to the end of your ~/.bashrc file.
if [ -d "$HOME/.local/bin" ] ; then
  PATH="$PATH:$HOME/.local/bin"
fi

Badfish Standalone Script

git clone https://github.com/redhat-performance/badfish && cd badfish
pip install -r requirements.txt

NOTE:

  • This will allow the badfish script execution via ./src/badfish/badfish.py

Badfish Standalone within a virtualenv

git clone https://github.com/redhat-performance/badfish && cd badfish
virtualenv .badfish_venv
source .badfish_venv/bin/activate

NOTE:

  • Both setup methods above can be used within a virtualenv
  • After using badfish, the virtual environment can be deactivated running the deactivate command

Usage

Badfish operates against a YAML configuration file to toggle between key:value pair sets of boot interface/device strings. You just need to create your own interface config that matches your needs to easily swap/save interface/device boot ordering or select one-time boot devices.

Usage via Podman

Badfish happily runs in a container image using podman, for this you need to first pull the Badfish image via:

podman pull quay.io/quads/badfish

You can then run badfish from inside the container:

podman run -it --rm --dns $DNS_IP quay.io/quads/badfish -H $HOST -u $USER -p $PASS --reboot-only

NOTE:

  • If you are running quads against a host inside a VPN you must specify your VPN DNS server ip address with --dns
  • If you would like to use a different file for config/idrac_interfaces.yml you can map a volume to your modified config with -v idrac_interfaces.yml:config/idrac_interfaces.yml

Common Operations

Enforcing an OpenStack Director-style interface order

In our performance/scale R&D environments TripleO-based OpenStack deployments require a specific 10/25/40GbE NIC to be the primary boot device for PXE, followed by disk, and then followed by the rest of the interfaces.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass -i config/idrac_interfaces.yml -t director

Enforcing a Foreman-style interface order

Foreman and Red Hat Satellite (as of 6.x based on Foreman) require managed systems to first always PXE from the interface that is Foreman-managed (DHCP/PXE). If the system is not set to build it will simply boot to local disk. In our setup we utilize a specific NIC for this interface based on system type.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass -i config/idrac_interfaces.yml -t foreman

Enforcing a Custom interface order

Badfish allows you to supply your own interface order type in addition to director and foreman modes as defined in idrac_interfaces.yml

  • Supply your own distinct string in the first part of the key value (split by _)
  • Refer to it via the string name
  • Consequently host type overrides can also be leveraged

We will use the custom interface order called ocp5beta as an example.

Example any system you want to boot with a certain custom interface order.

ocp5beta_fc640_interfaces: NIC.Slot.2-4,NIC.Slot.2-1,NIC.Slot.2-2,NIC.Slot.2-3

Example a rack of systems you want to boot with a certain custom interface order.

ocp5beta_f21_fc640_interfaces: NIC.Slot.2-4,NIC.Slot.2-1,NIC.Slot.2-2,NIC.Slot.2-3

Example a specific system you want to boot with a certain custom interface order

ocp5beta_f21_h23_fc640_interfaces: NIC.Slot.2-4,NIC.Slot.2-1,NIC.Slot.2-2,NIC.Slot.2-3

Now you can run Badfish against the custom interface order type you have defined, refer to the custom overrides on further usage examples.

src/badfish/badfish.py --host-list /tmp/hosts -u root -p password -i config/idrac_interfaces.yml -t ocp5beta

Forcing a one time boot to a specific device

To force systems to perform a one-time boot to a specific device you can use the --boot-to option and pass as an argument the device you want the one-time boot to be set to. This will change the one time boot BIOS attributes OneTimeBootMode and OneTimeBootSeqDev and on the next reboot it will attempt to PXE boot or boot from that interface string. You can obtain the device list via the --check-boot directive below.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --boot-to NIC.Integrated.1-3-1

Forcing a one time boot to a specific mac address

To force systems to perform a one-time boot to a specific mac address you can use the --boot-to-mac option and pass as an argument the device mac address for a specific NIC that you want the one-time boot to be set to. This will change the one time boot BIOS attributes OneTimeBootMode and OneTimeBootSeqDev and on the next reboot it will attempt to PXE boot or boot from that interface.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --boot-to-mac A9:BB:4B:50:CA:54

Forcing a one time boot to a specific type

To force systems to perform a one-time boot to a specific type you can use the --boot-to-type option and pass as an argument the device type, as defined on the iDRAC interfaces yaml, that you want the one-time boot to be set to. For this action you must also include the path to your interfaces yaml. This will change the one time boot BIOS attributes OneTimeBootMode and OneTimeBootSeqDev and on the next reboot it will attempt to PXE boot or boot from the first interface defined for that host type on the interfaces yaml file.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass -i config/idrac_interfaces.yml --boot-to-type foreman

Forcing a one-time boot to PXE

To force systems to perform a one-time boot to PXE, simply pass the --pxe flag to any of the commands above, by default it will pxe off the first available device for PXE booting.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass -i config/idrac_interfaces.yml -t foreman --pxe

Rebooting a system

In certain cases you might need to only reboot the host, for this case we included the --reboot-only flag which will force a GracefulRestart on the target host. Note that this option is not to be used with any other option.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --reboot-only

Power cycling a system

For a hard reset you can use --power-cycle flag which will run a ForceOff instruction on the target host. Note that this option is not to be used with any other option.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --power-cycle

Power State Control

You can also turn a server on or off by using options --power-on and --power-off respectively.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --power-on

Check Power State

For checking the current power state of a server you can run badfish with the --power-state option.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --power-state

Partial Output:

- INFO     - Power state for mgmt-your-server.example.com: On

Resetting iDRAC

For the replacement of racadm racreset, the optional argument --racreset was added. When this argument is passed to badfish, a graceful restart is triggered on the iDRAC itself.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --racreset

BIOS factory reset

You can restore BIOS default settings by calling Badfish with the option --factory-reset.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --factory-reset

NOTE:

  • WARNING: Use this carefully, vendor defaults differ and may be disruptive. Do not use this in the Scale Lab or ALIAS.

Check current boot order

To check the current boot order of a specific host you can use the --check-boot option which will return an ordered list of boot devices. Additionally you can pass the -i option which will in turn print on screen what type of host does the current boot order match as those defined on the iDRAC interfaces yaml.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass -i config/idrac_interfaces.yml --check-boot

Variable number of retries

At certain points during the execution of badfish the program might come across a non responsive resources and will automatically retry to establish connection. We have included a default value of 15 retries after failed attempts but this can be customized via the --retries optional argument which takes as input an integer with the number of desired retries.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass -i config/idrac_interfaces.yml -t foreman --retries 20

Firmware inventory

If you would like to get a detailed list of all the devices supported by iDRAC you can run badfish with the --firware-inventory option which will return a list of devices with additional device info.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --firmware-inventory

Clear Job Queue

If you would like to clear all the jobs that are queued on the remote iDRAC you can run badfish with the --clear-jobs option which query for all active jobs in the iDRAC queue and will post a request to clear the queue.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --clear-jobs

You can also force the clearing of Dell iDRAC job queues by passing the --force option.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --clear-jobs --force

List Job Queue

If you would like to list all active jobs that are queued on the remote iDRAC you can run badfish with the --ls-jobs option which query for all active jobs in the iDRAC queue and will return a list with all active items.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --ls-jobs

List Network Interfaces

For getting a list of network interfaces with individual metadata for each you can run badfish with the --ls-interfaces option.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --ls-interfaces

List Memory

For getting a detailed list of memory devices you can run badfish with the --ls-memory option.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --ls-memory

List Processors

For getting a detailed list of processors you can run badfish with the --ls-processors option.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --ls-processors

Check Virtual Media

If you would like to check for any active virtual media you can run badfish with the --check-virtual-media option which query for all active virtual devices.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --check-virtual-media

Unmount Virtual Media

If you would like to unmount all active virtual media you can run badfish with the --unmount-virtual-media option which post a request for unmounting all active virtual devices.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --unmount-virtual-media

NOTE:

  • This functionality is only available for SuperMicro devices.

Get SRIOV mode

For checking if the global SRIOV mode is enabled you can use --get-sriov

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --get-sriov

NOTE:

  • This is only supported on DELL devices.

Set SRIOV mode

For changing the mode of the SRIOV glabal BIOS attribute, we have included 2 new arguments. In case the setting is in disabled mode, you can enable it by passing --enable-sriov

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --enable-sriov

On the contrary, if you would like to disable the SRIOV mode, you can now pass --disable-sriov

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass --disable-sriov

NOTE:

  • This is only supported on DELL devices.

Bulk actions via text file with list of hosts

In the case you would like to execute a common badfish action on a list of hosts, you can pass the optional argument --host-list in place of -H with the path to a text file with the hosts you would like to action upon and any addtional arguments defining a common action for all these hosts.

./src/badfish/badfish.py --host-list /tmp/bad-hosts -u root -p yourpass --clear-jobs

Verbose output

If you would like to see a more detailed output on console you can use the --verbose option and get a additional debug logs. Note: this is the default log level for the --log argument.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass -i config/idrac_interfaces.yml -t foreman --verbose

Log to file

If you would like to log the output of badfish you can use the --log option and pass the path to where you want badfish to log it's output to.

./src/badfish/badfish.py -H mgmt-your-server.example.com -u root -p yourpass -i config/idrac_interfaces.yml -t foreman --log /tmp/bad.log

iDRAC and Data Format

Dell Foreman and PXE Interface

Your usage may vary, this is what our configuration looks like via config/idrac_interfaces.yml

Machine Type Network Interface
Dell fc640 NIC.Integrated.1-1-1
Dell r620 NIC.Integrated.1-3-1
Dell r630 NIC.Slot.2-1-1
Dell r930 NIC.Integrated.1-3-1
Dell r720xd NIC.Integrated.1-3-1
Dell r730xd NIC.Integrated.1-3-1
Dell r740xd NIC.Integrated.1-3-1
Dell r640 NIC.Integrated.1-1-1

Host type overrides

Every other method that requires passing the -i argument, is going to parse the key strings from this and look for the most adequate candidate for the given FQDN. We format the key strings with the following criteria:

{host_type}_[{rack}_[{ULocation}_[{blade}_]]]{model}_interfaces

With rack, ULocation and blade being optional in a hierarchical fashion otherwise mandatory, ergo you can't define blade without ULocation and so forth. host_type and model values are always mandatory.

Example for director type overrides:

Keys defined on interfaces yaml FQDN Use boot order
director_r620_interfaces mgmt-f21-h17-000-r620.domain.com NO
director_f21_r620_interfaces mgmt-f21-h17-000-r620.domain.com NO
director_f21_h17_r620_interfaces mgmt-f21-h17-000-r620.domain.com YES
Keys defined on interfaces yaml FQDN Use boot order
director_r620_interfaces mgmt-f21-h18-000-r620.domain.com NO
director_f21_r620_interfaces mgmt-f21-h18-000-r620.domain.com YES
director_f21_h17_r620_interfaces mgmt-f21-h18-000-r620.domain.com NO
Keys defined on interfaces yaml FQDN Use boot order
director_r620_interfaces mgmt-f22-h17-000-r620.domain.com YES
director_f21_r620_interfaces mgmt-f22-h17-000-r620.domain.com NO
director_f21_h17_r620_interfaces mgmt-f22-h17-000-r620.domain.com NO

Contributing

We love pull requests and welcome contributions from everyone! Please use the development branch to send pull requests. Here are the general steps you'd want to follow.

  1. Fork the Badfish Github repository
  2. Clone the forked repository
  3. Push your changes to your forked clone
  4. Open a pull request against our development branch.

Contact

  • You can find us on IRC in #badfish (or #quads) on irc.libera.chat if you have questions or need help. Click here to join in your browser.

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Vendor-agnostic tool for managing bare-metal systems via the Redfish API

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