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README.rst

pygrin

A basic collection of routines to ray trace through graded index (GRIN) lenses with a parabolic radial profile.

Usage

Example Light paths in a 0.25 pitch GRIN lens from an ancient Melles Griot Catalog:

import pygrin as grin
n = 1.608
gradient = 0.339
length = 5.37
diameter = 1.8

pitch = grin.period(gradient, length)
ffl = grin.FFL(n,pitch,length)
efl = grin.EFL(n,pitch,length)
na = grin.NA(n,pitch,length,diameter)

angle = grin.max_angle(n,pitch,length,diameter)
print('expected pitch = 0.29,            calculated %.2f' % pitch)
print('expected FFL = 0.46 mm,           calculated %.2f' % ffl)
print('expected NA = 0.46,               calculated %.2f' % na)
print('expected full accept angle = 55°, calculated %.0f°' % (2*angle*180/np.pi))
print('working distance = %.2f mm'%(efl-ffl))

Produces:

expected pitch = 0.29,            calculated 0.29
expected FFL = 0.46,              calculated 0.47
expected NA = 0.46,               calculated 0.46
expected full accept angle = 55°, calculated 55°
working distance = 1.43 mm

But the real utility of this module is creating plots that show the path of rays through a GRIN lens. For examples, see <https://pygrin.readthedocs.io>

Installation

Source code is available at <https://github.com/scottprahl/pygrin> or the module can be installed using pip:

pip install pygrin

License

pygrin is licensed under the terms of the MIT license.

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