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Emmet (ex-Zen Coding) for Sublime Text

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README.md

Emmet for Sublime Text

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Official Emmet plugin (previously called Zen Coding) for Sublime Text.

How to install

Warning: this plugin may not work at all in some OSes since it written in JavaScript and uses PyV8 and Google V8 binaries to run. If you experience problems or editor crashes please fill an issue.

With Package Control:

  1. Run “Package Control: Install Package” command, find and install Emmet plugin.
  2. Restart ST editor (if required)

Manually:

  1. Clone or download git repo into your packages folder (in ST, find Browse Packages... menu item to open this folder)
  2. Restart ST editor (if required)

WARNING: When plugin is installed, it will automatically download required PyV8 binary so you have to wait a bit (see Loading PyV8 binary message on status bar). If you experience issues with automatic PyV8 loader, try to install it manually.

New features of Emmet (compared with old Zen Coding)

Available actions

Increment/Decrement Number actions:

  • Increment by 1: Ctrl+↑
  • Decrement by 1: Ctrl+↓
  • Increment by 0.1: Alt+↑
  • Decrement by 0.1: Alt+↓
  • Increment by 10: ⌥⌘↑ / Shift+Alt+↑
  • Decrement by 10: ⌥⌘↓ / Shift+Alt+↓

Extensions support

You can easily extend Emmet with new actions and filters or customize existing ones. In Emmet.sublime-settings, define extensions_path setting and Emmet will load all .js and .json files in specified folder at startup.

The default value of extensions_path is ~/emmet, which points to emmet folder inside your OS user’s home folder.

Also, you can create sections named as extension files (e.g. snippets, preferences and syntaxProfiles) inside user’s Emmet.sublime-settings file and write your customizations there. See original settings file for examples.

Overriding keyboard shortcuts

Sublime Text is a great text editor with lots of features and actions. Most of these actions are bound to keyboard shortcuts so it’s nearly impossible to provide convenient plugin shortcuts for third-party plugins.

If you’re unhappy with default keymap, you can disable individual keyboard shortcuts with disabled_keymap_actions preference of Emmet.sublime-settings file.

Use a comma-separated list of action names which default keyboard shortcuts should be disabled. For example, if you want to release Ctrl+E (“Expand Abbreviation”) and Ctrl+U (“Update Image Size”) shortcuts, your must set the following value:

"disabled_keymap_actions": "expand_abbreviation, update_image_size"

You should refer Default (Your-OS-Name).sublime-keymap file to get action ids (look for args/action key).

To disable all default shortcuts, set value to all:

"disabled_keymap_actions": "all"

Not that if you disabled any action like so and you’re create your own keyboard shortcut, you should not use emmet_action_enabled.ACTION_NAME context since this is the key that disables action.

Tab key handler

Emmet plugin allows you to expand abbreviations with Tab key, just like regular snippets. On the other hand, due to dynamic nature and extensive syntax, sometimes you may get unexpected results. This section describes how Tab handler works and how you can fine-tune it.

By default, Tab handler works in a limited syntax scopes: HTML, XML, HAML, CSS, SASS/SCSS, LESS and strings in programming languages (like JavaScript, Python, Ruby etc.). It means:

  • You have to switch your document to one of the syntaxes listed above to expand abbreviations by Tab key.
  • With Ctrl-E shortcut, you can expand abbreviations everywhere, its scope is not limited.
  • When you expand abbreviation inside strings of programming languages, the output is generated with special output profile named line that generates output as a single line.

To fine-tune Tab key handler, you can use the following settings in user’s Emmet.sublime-settings file:

  • disable_tab_abbreviations_for_scopes — a comma-separated list of syntax scopes where Tab key handler should be disabled. For example, if you want disable handler inside strings of programming languages and HAML syntax, your setting will look like this:
"disable_tab_abbreviations_for_scopes": "text.haml, string"
  • disabled_single_snippet_for_scopes — a comma-separated list of syntax scopes where Tab handler should be disabled when expanding a single abbreviation. Currently, ST doesn’t provide API for getting list of native snippets. So, for example, if you try to expand a php abbreviation, it will be passed to Emmet which outputs <php></php> instead of PHP block as defined in native ST snippets. As a workaround, if you’re trying to expand a single abbreviation inside scope defined in disabled_single_snippet_for_scopes setting Emmet will look for its name inside its own snippets catalog first, inside known_html_tags setting second and if it’s not found, it allows ST to handle it and expand native abbreviation, if matched.
  • known_html_tags — a space-separated list of all known HTML tags used for lookup as described above.

If you’re unhappy with Emmet tab handler behavior, you can disable it: just add "disable_tab_abbreviations": true into user’s Preferences.sublime-settings file.

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