Some refactoring stuff for Vim
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README

Refactor plugin for Vim.

You can use this plugin to make some refactoring on your code.
It was originally written to work with the Ruby language, but it's
flexible (I hope, I'll add some more languages later) to work with
another languages.

Examples
========

Extracting a method
-------------------

Let's say we have this Ruby code:

01. module Test
02.   puts "bye"
03.   puts "tchau"
04.   puts "hasta la vista"
05.   # test class
06.   class Test
07.      puts "hi"
08.      puts "oi"
09.      puts "hola"
10.      def initialize
11.         @foo = "bar"
12.      end
13.      # test method
14.      def test
15.         puts "test!"
16.         puts "bye!"
17.         c = 0
18.         while c < 10
19.            puts "c = #{c}"
20.            c += 1
21.         end 
22.      end
23.   end
24. end

If the cursor is positioned over the line 2, and the lines are selected
till the line 4, we can type:

:Rem <method> (<p1>, <p2>)

or, in visual mode, typing the new method name when asked

rem 

to extract those lines to a <method> with some optionally parameters. So,

:Rem say_bye<CR>

or on visual mode

rem (typing say_bye)

will turn our code to this:

01. module Test
02.    # test class
03.    class Test
04.       puts "hi"
05.       puts "oi"
06.       puts "hola"
07.       def initialize
08.          @foo = "bar"
09.       end
10.       # test method
11.       def test
12.          puts "test!"
13.          puts "bye!"
14.          c = 0
15.          while c < 10
16.             puts "c = #{c}"
17.             c += 1
18.          end 
19.       end
20.    end
21.    def say_bye
22.       puts "bye"
23.       puts "tchau"
24.       puts "hasta la vista"
25.    end
26. end

where a module method was created with the selected content.

Now, selecting from line 4 to 6, extracting the code to a method
inside the class Test, called say_hi, with

:Rem say_hi

or, in visual mode, typing say_hi when asked for a new method name

rem

and the code now is 

00. module Test
01.    # test class
02.    class Test
03.       def initialize
04.          @foo = "bar"
05.       end
06.       # test method
07.       def test
08.          puts "test!"
09.          puts "bye!"
10.          c = 0
11.          while c < 10
12.             puts "c = #{c}"
13.             c += 1
14.          end 
15.       end
16.       def say_hi
17.          puts "hi"
18.          puts "oi"
19.          puts "hola"
20.       end
21.    end
22.    def say_bye
23.       puts "bye"
24.       puts "tchau"
25.       puts "hasta la vista"
26.    end
27. end

We can remove content from inside a method to another one. Let's
say we want to remove lines 8 and 9 to a method called another_test.
Select those 2 lines and

:Rem another_test

or, in visual mode, typing another_test when asked about the new method
name

rem

and now the code is

01. module Test
02.    # test class
03.    class Test
04.       def initialize
05.          @foo = "bar"
06.       end
07.       # test method
08.       def test
09.          another_test
10.          c = 0
11.          while c < 10
12.             puts "c = #{c}"
13.             c += 1
14.          end 
15.       end
16.       def another_test
17.          puts "test!"
18.          puts "bye!"
19.       end
20.       def say_hi
21.          puts "hi"
22.          puts "oi"
23.          puts "hola"
24.       end
25.    end
26.    def say_bye
27.       puts "bye"
28.       puts "tchau"
29.       puts "hasta la vista"
30.    end
31. end

Now we have the option to extract lines 10 to 14 or 12 to 13. Let's
try the first option, extracting the code to a method called count.
Select from lines 10 to 14 and

:Rem count

or, on visual mode, typing count when asked about the new method name

rem

and now the code is

01. module Test
02.    # test class
03.    class Test
04.       def initialize
05.          @foo = "bar"
06.       end
07.       # test method
08.       def test
09.          another_test
10.          count
11.       end
12.       def count
13.          c = 0
14.          while c < 10
15.             puts "c = #{c}"
16.             c += 1
17.          end 
18.       end
19.       def another_test
20.          puts "test!"
21.          puts "bye!"
22.       end
23.       def say_hi
24.          puts "hi"
25.          puts "oi"
26.          puts "hola"
27.       end
28.    end
29.    def say_bye
30.       puts "bye"
31.       puts "tchau"
32.       puts "hasta la vista"
33.    end
34. end

Or we can extract only from line 12 (see code before the last change)
to a method called show_count, creating a c parameter and sending the c variable
to the method, selecting line 12 and

:Rem show_count c

or on visual mode, typing show_count c when asked about the new method name

rem

and now the code is

01. module Test
02.    # test class
03.    class Test
04.       def initialize
05.          @foo = "bar"
06.       end
07.       # test method
08.       def test
09.          another_test
10.          c = 0
11.          while c < 10
12.             show_count(c)
13.             c += 1
14.          end 
15.       end
16.       def show_count(c)
17.          puts "c = #{c}"
18.       end
19.       def another_test
20.          puts "test!"
21.          puts "bye!"
22.       end
23.       def say_hi
24.          puts "hi"
25.          puts "oi"
26.          puts "hola"
27.       end
28.    end
29.    def say_bye
30.       puts "bye"
31.       puts "tchau"
32.       puts "hasta la vista"
33.    end
34. end

Renaming a variable on method scope
-----------------------------------

If we have this piece of code:

01. # test method, with foo argument
02. def some_method(foo)
03.   foo.inspect
04.   puts "foo converted to string: #{foo}"
05. end

and position the cursor on rows 3 or 4 and use

:Rrv foo bar

or, more easier, put the cursor over the foo word and type

rrv (typing the new variable name when asked)

we changed all the ocurrences of foo to bar *inside the method*:

01. # test method, with foo argument
02. def some_method(bar)
03.    bar.inspect
04.    puts "bar converted to string: #{bar}"
05. end

if the cursor position is on line 1, all the other ocurrences of
the foo var above (ok, we don't have more lines above here but you 
got the point) will be also changed.

Renaming an attribute
---------------------

If we have this piece of code:

01.   class Test
02.      def initialize
03.         @foo = "bar"
04.      end
05.      def print_contents
06.         # foo contents
07.         puts "#{@foo}"
08.      end
09.   end

and wants to change all the ocurrences of the foo attribute (@foo)
to @bar, we can use, inside the class scope:

:Rra foo bar

or, more easier, put the cursor over the foo word and type

rra (typing the new attribute name when asked)

so we can get

01.   class Test
02.      def initialize
03.         @bar = "bar"
04.      end
05.      def print_contents
06.         # foo contents
07.         puts "#{@bar}"
08.      end
09.   end

Align assigment operators
-------------------------

Suppose we have this code:

a = 1
ab += 2
abc         -= 3
abcd *= 4
abcde    /= 2
abcdef =~ /foo/
abcdefg       != /bar/

Ugly, right? Select all the lines and type

raa

and then 

a       =  1
ab      += 2
abc     -= 3
abcd    *= 4
abcde   /= 2
abcdef  =~ /foo/
abcdefg != /bar/

Better, uh?