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Aggregate Values in a Table

Aggregating a table is creating a new table by computing sums, averages, and so on, out of material from the first table.

New: custom column names, sort output, hlines on output.

Examples

A very simple example. We have a table of activities and quantities (whatever they are) over several days.

#+NAME: original
| Day       | Color | Level | Quantity |
|-----------+-------+-------+----------|
| Monday    | Red   |    30 |       11 |
| Monday    | Blue  |    25 |        3 |
| Tuesday   | Red   |    51 |       12 |
| Tuesday   | Red   |    45 |       15 |
| Tuesday   | Blue  |    33 |       18 |
| Wednesday | Red   |    27 |       23 |
| Wednesday | Blue  |    12 |       16 |
| Wednesday | Blue  |    15 |       15 |
| Thursday  | Red   |    39 |       24 |
| Thursday  | Red   |    41 |       29 |
| Thursday  | Red   |    49 |       30 |
| Friday    | Blue  |     7 |        5 |
| Friday    | Blue  |     6 |        8 |
| Friday    | Blue  |    11 |        9 |

To begin with we want to gather all colors and count how many times they appear. We are interested only in the second column named Color.

First we give a name to the table through the #+NAME: or #+TBLNAME: tags, just above the table. Then we create a dynamic block to receive the aggregation:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "original" :cols "Color count()"
#+END:

Now typing C-c C-c in the dynamic block counts the colors in the original table:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "original" :cols "Color count()"
| Color | count() |
|-------+---------|
| Red   |       7 |
| Blue  |       7 |
#+END:

Org found two colors, Red and Blue. It found 7 occurrences for each.

Now we want to aggregate this table for each day (because several rows exist for each day). We want the average value of the Level column for each day, and the sum of the Quantity column. We write down the block specifying that (later we will see how to automate the creation of such a block):

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table original :cols "Day vmean(Level) vsum(Quantity)"
#+END

Typing C-c C-c in the dynamic block computes the aggregation:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table original :cols "Day vmean(Level) vsum(Quantity)"
| Day       | vmean(Level) | vsum(Quantity) |
|-----------+--------------+----------------|
| Monday    |         27.5 |             14 |
| Tuesday   |           43 |             45 |
| Wednesday |           18 |             54 |
| Thursday  |           43 |             83 |
| Friday    |            8 |             22 |
#+END

The source table is not changed in any way.

To get this result, we specified columns in this way, after the :cols parameter:

  • Day : we got the same column as in the source table, except entries are not duplicated. Here Day acts as a key grouping column. We may specify as many key columns as we want just by naming them. We get only one aggregated row for each different combination of values of key grouping columns.
  • vmean(Level) : this instructs Org to compute the average of values found in the Level column, grouped by the same Day.
  • vsum(Quantity): Org computes the sum of values found in the Quantity column, one sum for each Day.

SQL equivalent

If you are familiar with SQL, you would get a similar result with the GROUP BY statement:

select Day, mean(Level), sum(Quantity)
from original
group by Day;

R equivalent

If you are familiar with the R statistical language, you would get a similar result with factor and aggregate functions:

original <- the table as a data.frame
day_factor <- factor(original$Day)
aggregate (original$Level   , list(Day=day_factor), mean)
aggregate (original$Quantity, list(Day=day_factor), sum )

Datamash equivalent

The command-line Datamash software operates on CSV files and can achieve a similar result:

datamash -H -g Day mean Level sum Quantity <original.csv
GroupBy(Day)  mean(Level)  sum(Quantity)
Monday        27.5         14
Tuesday       43           45
Wednesday     18           54
Thursday      43           83
Friday         8           22

Key-binding & Wizard

Type C-c C-x x to launch a wizard for creating new dynamic blocks. Then answer aggregate for the type of block, and follow the instructions. (There are several other dynamic blocks that can be built this way: columnview, clocktable, propview, invoice, transpose, and any future block).

C-c C-x x aggregate is equivalent to M-x org-dblock-write:aggregate.

Other examples

Maybe we are just interested in the sum of Quantities, regardless of Days. We just type:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "original" :cols "vsum(Quantity)"
| vsum(Quantity) |
|----------------|
|            218 |
#+END

Or we may want to count the number of rows for each combination of Day and Color:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "original" :cols "count() Day Color"
| count() | Day       | Color |
|---------+-----------+-------|
|       1 | Monday    | Red   |
|       1 | Monday    | Blue  |
|       2 | Tuesday   | Red   |
|       1 | Tuesday   | Blue  |
|       1 | Wednesday | Red   |
|       2 | Wednesday | Blue  |
|       3 | Thursday  | Red   |
|       3 | Friday    | Blue  |
#+END

If we want to get measurements for Colors rather than Days, we type:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "original" :cols "Color vmean(Level) vsum(Quantity)"
| Color |  vmean(Level) | vsum(Quantity) |
|-------+---------------+----------------|
| Red   | 40.2857142857 |            144 |
| Blue  | 15.5714285714 |             74 |
#+END

The :cols parameter

The :cols parameter lists the columns of the resulting table. It contains in any order, grouping key columns and aggregation formulas.

The names of the columns in the original table may be:

  • the names as they appear in the header of the source table,
  • or $1, $2, $3 and so on (as in spreadsheet formulas),
  • additionally, the special column hline is used to group parts of the source table separated by horizontal lines.

The :cols parameter may be a string or a list of strings. Examples:

:cols "Day vmean(Level);f3 vsum(Quantity);f2"
:cols ("Day" "vmean(Level);f3" "vsum(Quantity);f2")

If a single string is used, it is split by spaces. Thus, a given formula, including its semicolon and modifiers, must not contain any space. If spaces are required within a formula, then use the parenthesis list. If a column name has spaces, quote it like this: ~’yellow submarine’~.

Grouping specifications in :cols

Grouping is done on columns of the source table acting as key columns. Just name the key columns.

Additionally, the hline specification means that rows between two horizontal lines should be grouped.

Key columns and hline are used to group rows of the source table with unique combinations of those columns.

hlines in the input table

hline = “horizontal line”

Here is a source table containing 3 blocks separated by horizontal lines:

#+NAME: originalhl
| Color | Level | Quantity |
|-------+-------+----------|
| Red   |    30 |       11 |
| Blue  |    25 |        3 |
| Red   |    51 |       12 |
| Red   |    45 |       15 |
| Blue  |    33 |       18 |
|-------+-------+----------|
| Red   |    27 |       23 |
| Blue  |    12 |       16 |
| Blue  |    15 |       15 |
| Red   |    39 |       24 |
| Red   |    41 |       29 |
|-------+-------+----------|
| Red   |    49 |       30 |
| Blue  |     7 |        5 |
| Blue  |     6 |        8 |
| Blue  |    11 |        9 |

And here is the aggregation by those 3 blocks:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table originalhl :cols "hline vmean(Level) vsum(Quantity)"
| hline | vmean(Level) | vsum(Quantity) |
|-------+--------------+----------------|
|     0 |         36.8 |             59 |
|     1 |         26.8 |            107 |
|     2 |        18.25 |             52 |
#+END:

If we want additional details with the Color column, we just name it:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table originalhl :cols "hline Color vmean(Level) vsum(Quantity)"
| hline | Color |  vmean(Level) | vsum(Quantity) |
|-------+-------+---------------+----------------|
|     0 | Red   |            42 |             38 |
|     0 | Blue  |            29 |             21 |
|     1 | Red   | 35.6666666667 |             76 |
|     1 | Blue  |          13.5 |             31 |
|     2 | Red   |            49 |             30 |
|     2 | Blue  |             8 |             22 |
#+END:

There is an ugly value, 35.6666666667, in the middle of the table. See later how to format it.

hlines in the output table

Example of an input table containing 3 hlines:

#+name: withhline
| cölØr  | vâluε | ra;han |
|--------+-------+--------|
| Red    |   1.3 |     41 |
| Red    |   3.5 |     35 |
| Yellow |   9.1 |     95 |
| Red    |   2.6 |     84 |
|--------+-------+--------|
| Blue   |   8.7 |     52 |
| Blue   |   7.0 |     29 |
| Yellow |   5.4 |     17 |
|--------+-------+--------|
| Blue   |   4.9 |     64 |
| Red    |   3.9 |     51 |
| Yellow |   2.4 |     55 |
| Yellow |   6.6 |     34 |
|--------+-------+--------|
| Red    |   1.1 |     58 |
| Yellow |   3.4 |     51 |

With the :hline 1 parameter, we get back the original hlines. Without this parameter, the resulting table would have no hlines.

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "withhline" :cols "cölØr vâluε 'ra;han'" :hline 1
| cölØr  | vâluε | 'ra;han' |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Red    |   1.3 |       41 |
| Red    |   3.5 |       35 |
| Yellow |   9.1 |       95 |
| Red    |   2.6 |       84 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Blue   |   8.7 |       52 |
| Blue   |   7.0 |       29 |
| Yellow |   5.4 |       17 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Blue   |   4.9 |       64 |
| Red    |   3.9 |       51 |
| Yellow |   2.4 |       55 |
| Yellow |   6.6 |       34 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Red    |   1.1 |       58 |
| Yellow |   3.4 |       51 |
#+END:

This example is a shorthand for this one, where an explicit hline column is requested, then discarded with <>:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "withhline" :cols "hline;^n;<> cölØr vâluε 'ra;han'" :hline 1
| cölØr  | vâluε | 'ra;han' |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Red    |   1.3 |       41 |
| Red    |   3.5 |       35 |
| Yellow |   9.1 |       95 |
| Red    |   2.6 |       84 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Blue   |   8.7 |       52 |
| Blue   |   7.0 |       29 |
| Yellow |   5.4 |       17 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Blue   |   4.9 |       64 |
| Red    |   3.9 |       51 |
| Yellow |   2.4 |       55 |
| Yellow |   6.6 |       34 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Red    |   1.1 |       58 |
| Yellow |   3.4 |       51 |
#+END:

Actually, output hlines are not limited to input ones. They may appear on the major sorted column. In this example, the cölØr column is sorted, and we require output hlines with :hline 1. Then hlines will separate blocks of identical cölØr rows:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "withhline" :cols "cölØr;^a vâluε 'ra;han'" :hline 1
| cölØr  | vâluε | 'ra;han' |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Blue   |   8.7 |       52 |
| Blue   |   7.0 |       29 |
| Blue   |   4.9 |       64 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Red    |   1.3 |       41 |
| Red    |   3.5 |       35 |
| Red    |   2.6 |       84 |
| Red    |   3.9 |       51 |
| Red    |   1.1 |       58 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Yellow |   9.1 |       95 |
| Yellow |   5.4 |       17 |
| Yellow |   2.4 |       55 |
| Yellow |   6.6 |       34 |
| Yellow |   3.4 |       51 |
#+END:

In this previous example, output hlines are unrelated to input ones.

The :hline parameter may be 2. It means that two sorted columns will be looked at when deciding to put an hline. In the following example, the two sorted columns are hline and cölØr. Therefore output hlines separate blocks of identical hline and cölØr:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "withhline" :cols "hline;^n cölØr;^a vâluε 'ra;han'" :hline 2
| hline | cölØr  | vâluε | 'ra;han' |
|-------+--------+-------+----------|
|     0 | Red    |   1.3 |       41 |
|     0 | Red    |   3.5 |       35 |
|     0 | Red    |   2.6 |       84 |
|-------+--------+-------+----------|
|     0 | Yellow |   9.1 |       95 |
|-------+--------+-------+----------|
|     1 | Blue   |   8.7 |       52 |
|     1 | Blue   |   7.0 |       29 |
|-------+--------+-------+----------|
|     1 | Yellow |   5.4 |       17 |
|-------+--------+-------+----------|
|     2 | Blue   |   4.9 |       64 |
|-------+--------+-------+----------|
|     2 | Red    |   3.9 |       51 |
|-------+--------+-------+----------|
|     2 | Yellow |   2.4 |       55 |
|     2 | Yellow |   6.6 |       34 |
|-------+--------+-------+----------|
|     3 | Red    |   1.1 |       58 |
|-------+--------+-------+----------|
|     3 | Yellow |   3.4 |       51 |
#+END:

And the hline column may be discarded (but its side effect remains). To do so use the ;<> specifier:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "withhline" :cols "hline;^n;<> cölØr;^a vâluε 'ra;han'" :hline 2
| cölØr  | vâluε | 'ra;han' |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Red    |   1.3 |       41 |
| Red    |   3.5 |       35 |
| Red    |   2.6 |       84 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Yellow |   9.1 |       95 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Blue   |   8.7 |       52 |
| Blue   |   7.0 |       29 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Yellow |   5.4 |       17 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Blue   |   4.9 |       64 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Red    |   3.9 |       51 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Yellow |   2.4 |       55 |
| Yellow |   6.6 |       34 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Red    |   1.1 |       58 |
|--------+-------+----------|
| Yellow |   3.4 |       51 |
#+END:

The :hline parameter accepts a number:

  • :hline 0, :hline no, :hline nil, or no :hline mean that there will be no hlines in the output.
  • :hline 1, :hline yes, :hline t mean that hlines will separate blocks of identical rows regarding the major sorted column. In case no column is sorted, then output hlines will reflect input ones.
  • :hline 2 means that the major and the next major sorted columns will be used to separate identical rows regarding those two columns.
  • :hline 3, :hline 4, … may be specified, but they may result in too much hlines.

Aggregation formulas in :cols

Aggregation formulas are applied for each of those groupings, on the specified columns.

We saw examples with sum, mean, count aggregations. There are many other aggregations. They are based on functions provided by Calc:

  • count() or vcount()
    • in Calc: `u #' (`calc-vector-count') [`vcount'])
    • gives the number of elements in the group being aggregated; this function may or may not take a column parameter; with a parameter, empty cells are not counted (except with the E modifier)..
  • sum(X) or vsum(X)
    • in Calc: `u +' (`calc-vector-sum') [`vsum']
    • computes the sum of elements being aggregated
  • cnorm(X)
    • in Calc: `v N' (calc-cnorm') [`cnorm']
    • like vsum(X), compute the sum of values, but first replacing negative values by their opposite
  • max(X) or vmax(X)
    • in Calc: `u X' (`calc-vector-max') [`vmax']
    • gives the largest of the elements being aggregated
  • min(X) or vmin(X)
    • in Calc: `u N' (`calc-vector-min') [`vmin']
    • gives the smallest of the elements being aggregated
  • span(X) or vspan(X)
    • in Calc: `v :' (`calc-set-span') [`vspan']
    • summarizes values to be aggregated into an interval [MIN..MAX] where MIN and MAX are the minimal and maximal values to be aggregated
  • rnorm(X)
    • in Calc: `v n' (`calc-rnorm) [`rnorm']
    • like vmax(X), gives the maximum of values, but first replacing negative values by their opposite
  • mean(X) or vmean(X)
    • in Calc: `u M' (`calc-vector-mean') [`vmean']
    • computes the average (arithmetic mean) of elements being aggregated
  • meane(X) or vmeane(X)
    • in Calc: `I u M' (`calc-vector-mean-error') [`vmeane']
    • computes the average (as mean) along with the estimated error of elements being aggregated
  • median(X) or vmedian(X)
    • in Calc: `H u M' (`calc-vector-median') [`vmedian']
    • computes the median of elements being aggregated, by taken the middle element after sorting them
  • hmean(X) or vhmean(X)
    • in Calc: `H I u M' (`calc-vector-harmonic-mean') [`vhmean']
    • computes the harmonic mean of elements being aggregated
  • gmean(X) or vgmean(X)
    • in Calc: `u G' (`calc-vector-geometric-mean') [`vgmean']
    • computes the geometric mean of elements being aggregated
  • sdev(X) or vsdev(X)
    • in Calc: `u S' (`calc-vector-sdev') [`vsdev']
    • computes the standard deviation of elements being aggregated
  • psdev(X) or vpsdev(X)
    • in Calc: `I u S' (`calc-vector-pop-sdev') [`vpsdev']
    • computes the population standard deviation (divide by N instead of N-1)
  • var(X) or vvar(X)
    • in Calc: `H u S' (`calc-vector-variance') [`vvar']
    • computes the variance of elements being aggregated
  • pvar(X) or vpvar(X)
    • in Calc: `H u S' (`calc-vector-variance') [`vpvar']
    • computes the population variance of elements being aggregated
  • pcov(X,Y) or vpcov(X,Y)
    • in Calc: `I u C' (`calc-vector-pop-covariance') [`vpcov']
    • computes the population covariance of elements being aggregated from two columns (divides by N)
  • cov(X,Y) or vcov(X,Y)
    • in Calc: `u C' (`calc-vector-covariance') [`vcov']
    • computes the sample covariance of elements being aggregated from two columns (divides by N-1)
  • corr(X,Y) or vcorr(X,Y)
    • in Calc: `H u C' (`calc-vector-correlation') [`vcorr']
    • computes the linear correlation coefficient of elements being aggregated in two columns
  • prod(X) or vprod(X)
    • in Calc: `u *' (`calc-vector-product') [`vprod']
    • computes the product of elements being aggregated
  • vlist(X) or list(X)
    • gives the list of X being aggregated, verbatim, without aggregation.
  • (X) or X in a formula
    • returns the list of X being aggregated, without aggregation, passed through Calc interpretation.
  • sort(X)
    • in Calc: `v S' (`calc-sort') [`sort']
    • sorts elements to be aggregated in ascending order; only works on numerical values
  • rsort(X)
    • in Calc: `I v S' (`calc-sort') [`sort']
    • sorts elements to be aggregated in descending order; only works on numerical values
  • rev(X)
    • in Calc: `' (`calc-reverse-vector') [`rev']
    • returns the list of values to be aggregated in reverse order
  • subvec(X,from), subvec(X,from,to)
    • in Calc: `v s' (`calcFunc-subvec') [`subvec']
    • extracts a sub-list from X starting at from and ending at to excluded (or up to the end if to is not given). The first value is numbered 1. So for instance subvec(X,1,3) extracts the first two values
  • vmask(M,X)
    • in Calc: `v m' (`calcFunc-vmask') [`vmask']
    • extracts a sub-list from X, keeping only values for which correponding values in M (the mask) are not zero
  • head(X)
    • in Calc: `v h' (`calc-head') [`head']
    • returns the first value to be aggregated
  • rtail(X)
    • in Calc: `H I v h' (`calc-head') [`rtail']
    • returns the last value to be aggregated
  • find(X,val)
    • in Calc: `v f' (`calc-vector-find') [`find']
    • returns the index of val in the list of values to be aggregated, or 0 if val is not found. Index starts from 1
  • rdup(X)
    • in Calc: `v +' (`calc-remove-duplicates') [`rdup']
    • remove duplicates from X and returns remaining values sorted in ascending order
  • grade(X)
    • in Calc: `v G' (`calc-grade') [`grade']
    • returns a list of index of values to be aggregated: the index of the lowest value, then the second lowest value, and so on up to the index of the highest value. Indexes start from 1
  • rgrade(X)
    • in Calc: `I v G' (`calc-grade') [`rgrade']
    • Like grade in reverse order

The aggregation functions may be written with or without a leading v. sum and vsum are equivalent. The v form should be preferred, as it is the one used in the Org table spreadsheet, and in Calc. The non-v names may be dropped in the future.

Where Calc interpretation happens?

Calc is the standard Emacs desktop calculator. Actual mathematical computations are handled through Calc. This offers a lot of flexibility.

Example of input table. Besides numbers, there are cells with mathematical expressions like 20*30, or just labels as Red&Green without any mathematical meaning.

#+name: to_Calc_or_not_to_Calc
| Day       | Color      | Level  |
|-----------+------------+--------|
| Monday    | Red        | 20*30  |
| Monday    | Blue       | 55+45  |
| Tuesday   | Red        | 1      |
| Tuesday   | Red&Green  | 2      |
| Tuesday   | Blue+Green | 3      |
| Wednesday | Red        | (27)   |
| Wednesday | Red        | (12+1) |
| Wednesday | Green      | [15]   |

Basically, Calc operates twice. For example in the formula vsum(Level):

  • Calc computes Level for every input cell in the Level column,
  • then Calc computes vsum() applied to the resulting list.
#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "to_Calc_or_not_to_Calc" :cols "Day vsum(Level)"
| Day       | vsum(Level) |
|-----------+-------------|
| Monday    |         700 |
| Tuesday   |           6 |
| Wednesday |          55 |
#+END:

There are a few occasions were Calc computation does not happen: vcount() and vlist(X).

The vcount() sub-formula is evaluated as the number of input rows in each group, without Calc intervention. However, later on Calc can handle this number in a formula as this one: vsum(Level)/vcount()

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "to_Calc_or_not_to_Calc" :cols "Day vcount() vsum(Level)/vcount()"
| Day       | vcount() | vsum(Level)/vcount() |
|-----------+----------+----------------------|
| Monday    |        2 |                  350 |
| Tuesday   |        3 |                    2 |
| Wednesday |        3 |            18.333333 |
#+END:

And of course when input cells do not have a mathematical meaning, the result is non-sens:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "to_Calc_or_not_to_Calc" :cols "Day vsum(Color)"
| Day       | vsum(Color)                                    |
|-----------+------------------------------------------------|
| Monday    | Red + Blue                                     |
| Tuesday   | Red + error(3, '"Syntax error") + Blue + Green |
| Wednesday | 2 Red + Green                                  |
#+END:

The vlist(X) formula is not handled by Calc at all. This formula must appear alone (not embedded as part of a bigger formula). The cells X are not interpreted by Calc. As a result, vlist(X) produces a cell which concatenates input cells verbatim. For instance, the input cell 20*30 is left as-is.

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "to_Calc_or_not_to_Calc" :cols "Day vlist(Color) vlist(Level)"
| Day       | vlist(Color)               | vlist(Level)       |
|-----------+----------------------------+--------------------|
| Monday    | Red, Blue                  | 20*30, 55+45       |
| Tuesday   | Red, Red&Green, Blue+Green | 1, 2, 3            |
| Wednesday | Red, Red, Green            | (27), (12+1), [15] |
#+END:

As a contrast, the formula (Level) yields a list processed through Calc. For instance, the 20*30 formula is replaced by 600.

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "to_Calc_or_not_to_Calc" :cols "Day (Color) (Level)"
| Day       | (Color)                                        | (Level)        |
|-----------+------------------------------------------------+----------------|
| Monday    | [Red, Blue]                                    | [600, 100]     |
| Tuesday   | [Red, error(3, '"Syntax error"), Blue + Green] | [1, 2, 3]      |
| Wednesday | [Red, Red, Green]                              | [27, 13, [15]] |
#+END:

Here we used parenthesis in (Color) and (Level) because otherwise they would have been key columns. Instead of parenthesis, we can embed such expressions in formulas, like Level+1:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "to_Calc_or_not_to_Calc" :cols "Day Level+1"
| Day       | Level+1        |
|-----------+----------------|
| Monday    | [601, 101]     |
| Tuesday   | [2, 3, 4]      |
| Wednesday | [28, 14, [16]] |
#+END:

To summarize, a column name embedded in a formula is evaluated as the list of input cells, processed by Calc. Except for the vlist(Column) formula where input cells are kept verbatim.

By the way, what is the meaning of the expression Level*Level? For Monday, it is [600,100]*[600,100]. Then Calc simplifies that as a vector product: sum of individual products. 600^2+100^2

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "to_Calc_or_not_to_Calc" :cols "Day Level*Level Level+Level"
| Day       | Level*Level | Level+Level    |
|-----------+-------------+----------------|
| Monday    |      370000 | [1200, 200]    |
| Tuesday   |          14 | [2, 4, 6]      |
| Wednesday |        1123 | [54, 26, [30]] |
#+END:

The :cond filtering

This parameter is optional. If present, it specifies a lisp expression which tells whether or not a row should be kept. When the expression evaluates to nil, the row is discarded.

Examples of useful expressions includes:

  • :cond (equal Color "Red")
    • to keep only rows where Color is Red
  • :cond (> (string-to-number Quantity) 19)
    • to keep only rows for which Quantity is more than 19
    • note the call to string-to-number; without this call, Quantity would be used as a string
  • :cond (> (* (string-to-number Level) 2.5) (string-to-number Quantity))
    • to keep only rows for which 2.5*Level > Quantity

Beware with this example: :cond (equal Color "Red"). The input table should not have a column named =”Red”,= otherwised the condition will mean: /”keep only rows with the same value in columns Color and Red”/

As a special case, when :cond parameter is not given, the result is the same as =:cond “COL1 COL2 COL3…”=. All columns in the input table are specified as key columns, and output in the resulting table.

This is useful when just filtering. But be aware that aggregation still occurs. So duplicate input rows appear only once in the result.

Pull & Push

Two modes are available: pull & push.

In the pull mode, we use so called “dynamic blocks”. The resulting table knows how to build itself. Example:

We have a source table which is unaware that it will be derived in an aggregated table:

#+NAME: source1
| Day       | Color | Level | Quantity |
|-----------+-------+-------+----------|
| Monday    | Red   |    30 |       11 |
| Monday    | Blue  |    25 |        3 |
| Tuesday   | Red   |    51 |       12 |
| Tuesday   | Red   |    45 |       15 |
| Tuesday   | Blue  |    33 |       18 |
| Wednesday | Red   |    27 |       23 |
| Wednesday | Blue  |    12 |       16 |
| Wednesday | Blue  |    15 |       15 |
| Thursday  | Red   |    39 |       24 |
| Thursday  | Red   |    41 |       29 |
| Thursday  | Red   |    49 |       30 |
| Friday    | Blue  |     7 |        5 |
| Friday    | Blue  |     6 |        8 |
| Friday    | Blue  |    11 |        9 |

We create somewhere else a dynamic block which carries the specification of the aggregation:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "source1" :cols "Day vmean(Level) vsum(Quantity)"
| Day       | vmean(Level) | vsum(Quantity) |
|-----------+--------------+----------------|
| Monday    |         27.5 |             14 |
| Tuesday   |           43 |             45 |
| Wednesday |           18 |             54 |
| Thursday  |           43 |             83 |
| Friday    |            8 |             22 |
#+END

Typing C-c C-c in the dynamic block recomputes it freshly.

In push mode, the source table drives the creation of derived tables. We specify the wanted results in #+ORGTBL: SEND directives (as many as desired):

#+ORGTBL: SEND derived1 orgtbl-to-aggregated-table :cols "vmean(Level) vsum(Quantity)"
#+ORGTBL: SEND derived2 orgtbl-to-aggregated-table :cols "Day vmean(Level) vsum(Quantity)"
| Day       | Color | Level | Quantity |
|-----------+-------+-------+----------|
| Monday    | Red   |    30 |       11 |
| Monday    | Blue  |    25 |        3 |
| Tuesday   | Red   |    51 |       12 |
| Tuesday   | Red   |    45 |       15 |
| Tuesday   | Blue  |    33 |       18 |
| Wednesday | Red   |    27 |       23 |
| Wednesday | Blue  |    12 |       16 |
| Wednesday | Blue  |    15 |       15 |
| Thursday  | Red   |    39 |       24 |
| Thursday  | Red   |    41 |       29 |
| Thursday  | Red   |    49 |       30 |
| Friday    | Blue  |     7 |        5 |
| Friday    | Blue  |     6 |        8 |
| Friday    | Blue  |    11 |        9 |

We must create the receiving blocks somewhere else in the same file:

#+BEGIN RECEIVE ORGTBL derived1
#+END RECEIVE ORGTBL derived1
#+BEGIN RECEIVE ORGTBL derived2
#+END RECEIVE ORGTBL derived2

Then we come back to the source table and type C-c C-c with the cursor on the 1st pipe of the table, to refresh the derived tables:

#+BEGIN RECEIVE ORGTBL derived1
|  vmean(Level) | vsum(Quantity) |
|---------------+----------------|
| 27.9285714286 |            218 |
#+END RECEIVE ORGTBL derived1
#+BEGIN RECEIVE ORGTBL derived2
| Day       | vmean(Level) | vsum(Quantity) |
|-----------+--------------+----------------|
| Monday    |         27.5 |             14 |
| Tuesday   |           43 |             45 |
| Wednesday |           18 |             54 |
| Thursday  |           43 |             83 |
| Friday    |            8 |             22 |
#+END RECEIVE ORGTBL derived2

Pull & push modes use the same engine in the background. Thus, using either is just a matter of convenience.

Glitch: in push mode you may see strange ouput like \_{}. This is an escape generated by Org mode (nothing to do with orgaggregate). It happens for the following characters: &%#_^ To disable that, in the #+ORGTBL: SEND line, add this parameter: :no-escape true

Symbolic computation

The computations are based on Calc, which is a symbolic calculator. Thus, symbolic computations are built-in. Example:

This is the source table:

#+NAME: symtable
| Day       | Color |  Level | Quantity |
|-----------+-------+--------+----------|
| Monday    | Red   |   30+x |     11+a |
| Monday    | Blue  | 25+3*x |        3 |
| Tuesday   | Red   | 51+2*x |       12 |
| Tuesday   | Red   |   45-x |       15 |
| Tuesday   | Blue  |     33 |       18 |
| Wednesday | Red   |     27 |       23 |
| Wednesday | Blue  |   12+x |       16 |
| Wednesday | Blue  |     15 |   15-6*a |
| Thursday  | Red   |     39 |   24-5*a |
| Thursday  | Red   |     41 |       29 |
| Thursday  | Red   |   49+x |   30+9*a |
| Friday    | Blue  |      7 |      5+a |
| Friday    | Blue  |      6 |        8 |
| Friday    | Blue  |     11 |        9 |

And here is the aggregated, symbolic result:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "symtable" :cols "Day vmean(Level) vsum(Quantity)"
| Day       | vmean(Level)          | vsum(Quantity) |
|-----------+-----------------------+----------------|
| Monday    | 2. x + 27.5           | a + 14         |
| Tuesday   | 0.333333333334 x + 43 | 45             |
| Wednesday | x / 3 + 18            | 54 - 6 a       |
| Thursday  | x / 3 + 43.           | 4 a + 83       |
| Friday    | 8                     | a + 22         |
#+END

Symbolic calculations are correctly performed on x and a, which are symbolic (as opposed to numeric) expressions.

Note that if there are empty cells in the input, they will be changed to nan not a number, and the whole aggregation will yield nan. This is probably not the expected result. The N modifier (see paragraph “modifiers and formatters”) won’t help, because even though it will replace empty cells with zero, it will do the same for anything which does not look like a number. The best is to just avoid empty cells when dealing with symbolic calculations.

Correlation of two columns

Some aggregations work on two columns (rather than one column for vsum(), vmean()). Those aggregations are vcov(,), vpcov(,), vcorr(,).

  • vcorr(,) computes the linear correlation between two columns.
  • vcov(,) and vpcov(,) compute the covariance of two columns.

Example. We create a table where column y is a noisy version of column x:

#+TBLNAME: noisydata
| bin   |  x |       y |
|-------+----+---------|
| small |  1 |  10.454 |
| small |  2 |  21.856 |
| small |  3 |  30.678 |
| small |  4 |  41.392 |
| small |  5 |  51.554 |
| large |  6 |  61.824 |
| large |  7 |  71.538 |
| large |  8 |  80.476 |
| large |  9 |  90.066 |
| large | 10 | 101.070 |
| large | 11 | 111.748 |
| large | 12 | 121.084 |
#+TBLFM: $3=$2*10+random(1000)/500;%.3f
#+BEGIN: aggregate :table noisydata :cols "bin vcorr(x,y) vcov(x,y) vpcov(x,y)"
| bin   |     vcorr(x,y) |     vcov(x,y) |    vpcov(x,y) |
|-------+----------------+---------------+---------------|
| small | 0.999459736649 |        25.434 |       20.3472 |
| large | 0.999542438688 | 46.4656666667 | 39.8277142857 |
#+END

We see that the correlation between x and y is very close to 1, meaning that both columns are correlated. Indeed they are, as the y is computed from x with the formula y = 10*x + noise_between_0_and_2.

Dates

Some aggregations are possible on dates. Example. Here is a source table containing dates:

#+tblname: datetable
| Date                   |
|------------------------|
| [2035-12-22 Sat 09:01] |
| [2034-11-24 Fri 13:04] |
| [2030-09-24 Tue 13:54] |
| [2027-09-25 Sat 03:54] |
| [2023-02-26 Sun 16:11] |
| [2020-03-17 Tue 03:51] |
| [2018-08-21 Tue 00:00] |
| [2012-12-25 Tue 00:00] |

Here are the earliest and the latest dates, along with the average of all input dates:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table datetable :cols "vmin(Date) vmax(Date) vmean(Date)"
| vmin(Date)             | vmax(Date)             | vmean(Date) |
|------------------------+------------------------+-------------|
| <2012-12-25 Tue 00:00> | <2035-12-22 Sat 09:01> |   739448.44 |
#+END:

The average of all dates is a number? Actually, it is a date expressed as the number of days since [0000-12-31 Sun 00:00]. To force a number of days to be interpreted as a date, use the date() function:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table datetable :cols "date(vmean(Date))"
| date(vmean(Date))      |
|------------------------|
| <2025-07-16 Wed 10:29> |
#+END:

With the date() function in mind, all kinds of dates handling can be done. Example: the average of earliest and the latest dates is different from the average of all dates:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table datetable :cols "date(vmean(vmin(Date),vmax(Date))) date(vmean(Date))"
| date(vmean(vmin(Date),vmax(Date))) | date(vmean(Date))      |
|------------------------------------+------------------------|
| <2024-06-23 Sun 16:30>             | <2025-07-16 Wed 10:29> |
#+END:

Note that date() is not special to orgaggregate. It can be used in Org Mode spreadsheet formulas.

Durations

In Org Mode spreadsheet, durations have the forms HH:MM or HH:MM:SS. In orgaggregate, when an input cell have one of those two forms, it is converted into a number of seconds. For instance, 01:00 is converted into 3600 and 00:00:07 is converted into 7.

To output such a form, use a formatter: ;T; ;t, ;U. For example, we have 3 durations as input, and we want the average of them:

#+name: some_durations
|      dur |
|----------|
| 07:45:30 |
|    13:55 |
|    17:12 |
#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "some_durations" :cols "vmean(dur) vmean(dur);T vmean(dur);t vmean(dur);U"
| vmean(dur) | vmean(dur) | vmean(dur) | vmean(dur) |
|------------+------------+------------+------------|
|      46650 |   12:57:30 |      12.96 |      12:57 |
#+END:
  • With no formatter, we get a number of seconds
  • The T formatter outputs the result as HH:MM:SS
  • The U formatter outputs the result as HH:MM
  • The t formatter converts the result into a number of hours (it divides the number of seconds by 3600, and displays only two digits after dot)

The Calc syntax for durations is also recognized: HH@ MM’ or HH@ MM’ SS”. Example:

#+name: calc_durations
| dur        |
|------------|
| 07@ 45' 30 |
| 13@ 55'    |
| 17@ 12'    |
#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "calc_durations" :cols "vmean(dur)"
| vmean(dur)   |
|--------------|
| 12@ 57' 30." |
#+END:

Arbitrary column names

Column names are not necessarily alphanumeric words. They may contain any characters, including spaces, quotes, +, -, whatever. They must not extend on several lines thought.

Those names need to be protected with quotes (single or double quotes) within formulas.

Examples:

  • :colsmean('estimated value')
  • :cond (equal "true color" "Red")

Quoting is not required for

  • ascii letters
  • numbers
  • underscore _, dollar $, dot .
  • accented letters like à é
  • greek letters like α, Ω
  • northen letters like ø
  • russian letters like й
  • esperanto letters like ŭ

Note that in :cond Lisp expression, only double quotes work. This is because single quote in Lisp has a very special meaning.

Custom column names

In this example, column have names which are difficult to handle:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table original :cols "Day vmean(Level*2) vsum(Quantity^2)"
| Day       | vmean(Level*2) | vsum(Quantity^2) |
|-----------+----------------+------------------|
| Monday    |             55 |              130 |
| Tuesday   |             86 |              693 |
| Wednesday |             36 |             1010 |
| Thursday  |             86 |             2317 |
| Friday    |             16 |              170 |
#+END

We can give them custom names with the =;’custom name’= decoration:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table original :cols "Day vmean(Level*2);'mean2' vsum(Quantity^2);'sum_squares'"
| Day       | mean2 | sum_squares |
|-----------+-------+-------------|
| Monday    |    55 |         130 |
| Tuesday   |    86 |         693 |
| Wednesday |    36 |        1010 |
| Thursday  |    86 |        2317 |
| Friday    |    16 |         170 |
#+END

Decorators are optional.

Empty and malformed input cells

The input table may contain malformed mathematical text. For instance, a cell containing 5+ is malformed, because an expression is missing after the + symbol. In this case, the value will be replaced by error(2, '"Expected a number") which will appear in the aggregated table, signaling the problem.

An input cell may be empty. In this case, it may be ignored or converted to zero, depending on modifier flags E and N.

The empty cells treatment

  • makes no difference for vsum and count.
  • may result in zero for prod,
  • change vmean result,
  • change vmin and vmax, a possibly empty list of values resulting in inf or -inf

Some aggregation functions operate on two columns. If the two columns have empty values at different locations, then they should be interpreted as zero with the NE modifier, otherwise the result will be inconsistent.

Sometimes an input table may be malformed, with incomplete rows, like this one:

| Color | Level | Quantity | Day       |
|-------+-------+----------+-----------|
| Red   |    30 |       11 | Monday    |
| Blue  |    25 |        3 | Monday    |
|
| Blue  |    33 |       18 | Tuesday   |
| Red   |    27 |
| Blue  |    12 |       16 | Wednesday |
| Blue  |    15 |       15 |
|

Missing cells are handled as though they were empty.

(Almost) any expression can be specified

Virtually any Calc formula can be specified as an aggregation formula.

Single column name (as they appear in the header of the source table, or in the form of $1, $2, …, or the virtual column hline) are key columns. Everything else is given to Calc, to be computed as an aggregation.

For instance:

(3)                        ;; a constant
vmean(2*X+1)               ;; aggregate an expression
exp(vmean(map(log,N)))     ;; the exponential average
vsum((X-vmean(X))^2)       ;; X-vmean(X) centers the sample on zero

Arguably, the first expression is useless, but legal. The aggregation can apply to a computed list of values. The result of an aggregation can be further processed in a formula. An aggregation can even apply to an expression containing another aggregation.

In an expression, if a variable has the name of a column, then it is replaced by a Calc vector containing values from this column.

The special expression (C) (a column name within parenthesis) yields a list of values to be aggregated from this column, except they are not aggregated. Note that parenthesis are required, otherwise, C would act as a key grouping column.

Modifiers and formatters

An expression may optionally be followed by modifiers and formatters, after a semicolon. Examples:

vsum(X);p20    ;; increase Calc internal precision to 20 digits
vsum(X);f3     ;; output the result with 3 digits after the decimal dot
vsum(X);%.3f   ;; output the result with 3 digits after the decimal dot

The modifiers and formatters are fully compatible with those of the Org Mode spreadsheet.

Sorting

In this example, the output table is sorted numerically on its second column (look at the ^n specification):

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "original" :cols "Day vsum(Quantity);^n"
| Day       | vsum(Quantity) |
|-----------+----------------|
| Monday    |             14 |
| Friday    |             22 |
| Tuesday   |             45 |
| Wednesday |             54 |
| Thursday  |             83 |
#+END:

The rows of the resulting table may be sorted on any combination of its columns.

By default, no sorting is done. The output rows follows the ordering of the input rows.

Any column specification in the :cols parameter may be followed by a semicolon and a caret characters, and an ordering.

The specification for the ordering are the same as in Org Mode:

  • a: ascending alphabetical sort
  • A: descending alphabetical sort
  • n: ascending numerical sort
  • N: descending numerical sort
  • t: ascending date, time, or duration sort
  • T: descending date, time, or duration sort
  • f & F specifications are not (yet) implemented

Several columns may get a sorting specification. The major column is used for sorting. Only when two rows are equal regarding the major column, the second major column is compared. And if the two rows are still equal on this second column, the third is used, and so on.

The first sorted column in the :cols parameter is the major one. To declare another one as the major, follow it with a number, for instance 1. Columns without a number are minor ones.

Example:

:cols "AAA;^a BBB;^N2 CCC DDD;^t1"
  • Column DDD is sorted in ascending dates or times (t specification). It is the major sorting column (because of its 1 numbering).
  • Column BBB sorts rows which compare equal on column DDD (because of its 2 numbering). This column is assumed to contain numerical values, and it is sorted in descending order (N specification).
  • Column AAA is used to sort rows which compare equal regarding DDD and BBB. It is sorted in ascending alphabetical order (a specification).

Both a format and a sorting instruction may be given. Example:

:cols "EXPR:f3:^n"

The EXPR column is

  • formatted with 3 digits after dot (f3)
  • sorted numerically in ascending order (^n).

Discarding an output column

Why would anyone specify a column just to discard it in the output? For its side effects. For sorting the output table or for adding hlines to it.

To discard a column, add a ;<> modifier to the column description. This syntax is reminiscent of the <n> cookies in Org Mode tables, which instructs to shorten a column width to only n characters.

In this example, input hlines create a hline column which is used to add hlines to the output. Then this hline column is discarded with <>.

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "withhline" :cols "hline;^n;<> cölØr vsum(vâluε)" :hline 1
| cölØr  | vsum(vâluε) |
|--------+-------------|
| Red    |         7.4 |
| Yellow |         9.1 |
|--------+-------------|
| Blue   |        15.7 |
| Yellow |         5.4 |
|--------+-------------|
| Blue   |         4.9 |
| Red    |         3.9 |
| Yellow |          9. |
|--------+-------------|
| Red    |         1.1 |
| Yellow |         3.4 |
#+END:

Here is an example where rows are sorted on the cölØr column, but without displaying this column:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "withhline" :cols "cölØr;^a;<> vâluε;^n" :hline 1
| vâluε |
|-------|
|   4.9 |
|   7.0 |
|   8.7 |
|-------|
|   1.1 |
|   1.3 |
|   2.6 |
|   3.5 |
|   3.9 |
|-------|
|   2.4 |
|   3.4 |
|   5.4 |
|   6.6 |
|   9.1 |
#+END:

Post-aggregation spreadsheet formulas

Additional columns can be specified for the resulting table. With a previous example, adding a :formula parameter, we specify a new column $4 which uses aggregated columns. It is translated into a usual #+TBLFM: spreadsheet line.

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table original :cols "Day vmean(Level) vsum(Quantity)" :formula "$4=$2*$3"
| Day       | vmean(Level) | vsum(Quantity) |      |
|-----------+--------------+----------------+------|
| Monday    |         27.5 |             14 | 385. |
| Tuesday   |           43 |             45 | 1935 |
| Wednesday |           18 |             54 |  972 |
| Thursday  |           43 |             83 | 3569 |
| Friday    |            8 |             22 |  176 |
#+TBLFM: $4=$2*$3
#+END:

Moreover, if a #+TBLFM: was already there, it survives aggregation re-computations.

This happens in pull mode only.

Chaining

The result of an aggregation may become the source of further processing. To do that, just add a #+NAME: or #+TBLNAME: line just above the aggregated table. Here is an example of a double aggregation:

#+NAME: squantity
#+BEGIN: aggregate :table original :cols "Day vsum(Quantity)"
| Day       | SQuantity |
|-----------+-----------|
| Monday    |        14 |
| Tuesday   |        45 |
| Wednesday |        54 |
| Thursday  |        83 |
| Friday    |        22 |
#+TBLFM: @1$2=SQuantity
#+END:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "squantity" :cols "vsum(SQuantity)"
| vsum(SQuantity) |
|-----------------|
|             218 |
#+END:

Note the spreadsheet cell formula @1$2=SQuantity, which changes the column heading from it default vsum(Quantity) to SQuantity. This new heading will survive any refresh.

Sometimes the name of the aggregated table is not found by some babel block referencing it (Gnuplot blocks are among them). To fix that, just exchange the #+NAME: and #+BEGIN: lines:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table original :cols "Day vsum(Quantity)"
#+NAME: squantity
| Day       | SQuantity |
|-----------+-----------|
| Monday    |        14 |
| Tuesday   |        45 |
| Wednesday |        54 |
| Thursday  |        83 |
| Friday    |        22 |
#+TBLFM: @1$2=SQuantity
#+END:

The #.NAME: line will survive when recomputing the aggregation (as #.TBLFM: line survives)

Tricks

This chapter collects some tricks that may be useful.

Sorting

#+name: trick_table_1
| column |
|--------|
|    677 |
|    713 |
|    459 |
|    537 |
|    881 |

When a column needs to be sorted, the Calc calc-sort() function is handy:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "trick_table_1" :cols "(column) sort(column)"
| (column)                  | sort(column)              |
|---------------------------+---------------------------|
| [677, 713, 459, 537, 881] | [459, 537, 677, 713, 881] |
#+END:
  • (column) gives the list of values to aggregate, without aggregating them.
  • sort(column) gives the same list sorted in ascending ordrer.

A few lowest or highest values

Used with subvec(), sort() can retrieve the two lowest or the two highest values:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "trick_table_1" :cols "subvec(sort(column),1,3) subvec(sort(column),count()-1)"
| subvec(sort(column),1,3) | subvec(sort(column),count()-1) |
|--------------------------+--------------------------------|
| [459, 537]               | [713, 881]                     |
#+END:
  • subvec(...,1,3) extracts the two first values: from 1 to 3 excluded.
  • subvec(...,count()-1) extracts the two last values, numbered count()-1 and count()

And of course we may retrieve the average of the two first and the two last values:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "trick_table_1" :cols "vmean(subvec(sort(column),1,3)) vmean(subvec(sort(column),count()-1))"
| vmean(subvec(sort(column),1,3)) | vmean(subvec(sort(column),count()-1)) |
|---------------------------------+---------------------------------------|
|                             498 |                                   797 |
#+END:

Span of values

vmin() and vmax() can compute the span of aggregated values:

#+BEGIN: aggregate :table "trick_table_1" :cols "vmin(column) vmax(column) vmax(column)-vmin(column)"
| vmin(column) | vmax(column) | vmax(column)-vmin(column) |
|--------------+--------------+---------------------------|
|          459 |          881 |                       422 |
#+END:

Installation

Emacs package on Melpa: add the following lines to your .emacs file, and reload it.

(add-to-list 'package-archives '("melpa" . "http://melpa.milkbox.net/packages/") t)
(package-initialize)

Then browse the list of available packages and install orgtbl-aggregate

M-x package-list-packages

Alternatively, you can download the lisp files, and load them:

(load-file "orgtbl-aggregate.el")
(load-file "org-insert-dblock.el") ;; optional, extends C-c C-c i

Authors, contributors

Authors

  • Thierry Banel, tbanelwebmin at free dot fr, inception & implementation.
  • Michael Brand, Calc unleashed, #+TBLFM survival, empty input cells, formatters.

Contributors

  • Eric Abrahamsen, non-ascii column names
  • Alejandro Erickson, quoting non alphanumeric column names
  • Uwe Brauer, simpler example in documentation, take org-calc-default-modes preferences into account
  • Peking Duck, fixed obsolete letf function
  • Bill Hunker, discovered \_{} escape
  • Dirk Schmitt, surviving #.NAME: line
  • Dale Sedivec, case insensitive #+NAME: tags
  • falloutphil, underscore in column names
  • Baudilio Tejerina, t, T, U formatters
  • Marco Pas, bug comparing empty string
  • wuqui, sorting output table, filtering only
  • Nicolas Viviani, output hlines
  • Nils Lehmann, support old versions of the rx library

Changes

  • Wizard now correctly asks for columns with $1, $2... names when table header is missing
  • Handle tables beginning with hlines
  • Handle non-ascii column names
  • :formula parameter and #+TBLFM survival
  • Empty cells are ignored.
  • Empty output upon too small input set
  • Fix ordering of output values
  • Aggregations formulas may now be arbitrary expressions
  • Table headers (and the lack of) are better handled
  • Modifiers and formatters can now be specified as in the spreadsheet
  • Aggregation function names can optionally have a leading v, like sum & vsum
  • Increased performance on large data sets
  • Tables can be named with #+NAME: besides #+TBLNAME:
  • Document Melpa installation
  • Support quoting of column names, like “a.b” or ‘c/d’
  • Disable \_{} escape
  • #.NAME: inside #.BEGIN: survives
  • Missing input cells handled as empty ones
  • Back-port Org Mode 9.4 speed up
  • Increase performance when inserting result into the buffer
  • Aligned output in push mode
  • Added a hashtable to speedup aggregation
  • Back-port org-table-to-lisp which is now much faster
  • vlist(X) now yields input cells verbatim were (X) yields Calc processed input cells
  • Document dates handling and the date() function
  • Implement HH:MM:SS durations and T, t, U formatters
  • Sort output
  • Create hlines in the output
  • Missing :cond parameter means all columns
  • Remove C-c C-x i, use standard C-c C-x x instead
  • Avoid name collision between Calc functions and columns
  • More readable & faster code
  • Support for old versions of the rx library

License

Copyright (C) 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, 2022 Thierry Banel

orgtbl-aggregate is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.

orgtbl-aggregate is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for more details.

You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with this program. If not, see http://www.gnu.org/licenses/.

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