Generates JPA CriteriaQuery from RSQL query
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README.md

RSQL for JPA

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RESTful Service Query Language (RSQL) is a language and a library designed for searching entries in RESTful services.

This library provides converter of RSQL expression to JPA Criteria Query (object representation of JPQL), which is translated to SQL query. RSQL was originally created for KOSapi - RESTful web services for IS at the Czech Technical University in Prague.

Feel free to contribute!

Overview

The interaction with this API occurs from the JpaCriteriaQueryVisitor class. It has provided method for configuration purposes: getBuilderTools.

From getBuilderTools you can access or modify the ArgumentParser (a class responsible for parsing the string arguments into respective classes), the PropertiesMapper (a class responsible from re-mapping properties) and an optional PredicateBuilder (needed when you have an new ComparisonNode defined with the rsql-parser API).

If you want more control you may use the new JpaPredicateVisitor class.

In the usage section we will cover all that usages.

Usage

JpaCriteriaQueryVisitor class:

Example of basic usage with only provided predicate builders, default ArgumentParser and without selectors re-mapping:

// We will need a JPA EntityManager
EntityManager manager;

// Create the JPA Visitor
RSQLVisitor<CriteriaQuery<Course>, EntityManager> visitor = new JpaCriteriaQueryVisitor<Course>();

// Parse a RSQL into a Node
Node rootNode = new RSQLParser().parse("id==1");

// Visit the node to retrieve CriteriaQuery
CriteriaQuery<Course> query = rootNode.accept(visitor, manager);

// Do all sort of operations you want with the criteria query
query.orderBy(...);

// Execute and get results
List<Course> courses = entityManager.createQuery(query).getResultList();

If you want to create another comparison node you must configure the Rsql-parser Node and the JpaCriteriaQueryVisitor:

// We will need a JPA EntityManager
EntityManager manager;

// We will need your specific PredicateBuilderStrategy (if you want a set of new operators create a delegation strategy)
PredicateBuilderStrategy predicateStrategy = new MyDefOperatorStrategy();

// Create the JPA Visitor
JpaCriteriaQueryVisitor<Course> visitor = new JpaCriteriaQueryVisitor<Course>();
visitor.getBuilderTools().setPredicateBuilder(predicateStrategy);

// Define the new operator into rsql-parser API
Set<ComparisonOperator> operators = RSQLOperators.defaultOperators();
operators.add(new ComparisonOperator("=def="));

// execute parser
Node rootNode = new RSQLParser(operators).parse("id=def=1");

// Visit the node to retrieve CriteriaQuery
CriteriaQuery<Course> query = rootNode.accept(visitor, manager);

// Execute and get results
List<Course> courses = entityManager.createQuery(query).getResultList();

If you want to change to argument parser you must configure the JpaCriteriaQueryVisitor:

// We will need a JPA EntityManager
EntityManager manager;

// We will need your specific ArgumentParser
ArgumentParser argumentParser = new MyNewArgumentParser();

// Create the JPA Visitor
JpaCriteriaQueryVisitor<Course> visitor = new JpaCriteriaQueryVisitor<Course>();
visitor.getBuilderTools().setArgumentParser(argumentParser);

// execute parser
Node rootNode = new RSQLParser().parse("mysteriousElementType==Xyz123");

// Visit the node to retrieve CriteriaQuery
CriteriaQuery<Course> query = rootNode.accept(visitor, manager);

// Execute and get results
List<Course> courses = entityManager.createQuery(query).getResultList();

Finally, if you want to re-map the selector property name you must configure the JpaCriteriaQueryVisitor:

// We will need a JPA EntityManager
EntityManager manager;

// We will need your specific Mapper
Mapper propertyMapper = new MyCustomPropertiesMapper();

// Create the JPA Visitor
JpaCriteriaQueryVisitor<Course> visitor = new JpaCriteriaQueryVisitor<Course>();
visitor.getBuilderTools().setPropertiesMapper(propertyMapper);

// execute parser (nice feature for translating propertyNames to another language ...)
// 'departamento' translating to 'department'
// 'responsavel' translating to 'head'
// 'sobrenome' translating to 'surname'
// Node rootNode = new RSQLParser().parse("departamento.responsavel.sobrenome==One");

// execute parser (... or if you want to create aliases)
// 'd' translating to 'department'
// 'h' translating to 'head'
// 'sn' translating to 'surname'
Node rootNode = new RSQLParser().parse("d.h.sn==One");

// Visit the node to retrieve CriteriaQuery
CriteriaQuery<Course> query = rootNode.accept(visitor, manager);

// Execute and get results
List<Course> courses = entityManager.createQuery(query).getResultList();

JpaPredicateVisitor class:

Example of basic usage with only provided predicate builders, default ArgumentParser and without selectors re-mapping:

// We will need a JPA EntityManager
EntityManager manager;

// Create criteria and from 
CriteriaBuilder builder = manager.getCriteriaBuilder();
CriteriaQuery criteria = builder.createQuery(Course.class);
From root = criteria.from(Course.class);

// Create the JPA Predicate Visitor
RSQLVisitor<Predicate, EntityManager> visitor = new JpaPredicateVisitor<Course>().defineRoot(root);

// Parse a RSQL into a Node
Node rootNode = new RSQLParser().parse("id==1");

// Visit the node to retrieve CriteriaQuery
Predicate predicate = rootNode.accept(visitor, manager);

// Use generated predicate as you like
criteria.where(predicate);

RSQL syntax

RSQL syntax is described on RSQL-parser’s project page. There’s only one addition described below.

For comparing string arguments with Equals or Not Equals, you can use wildcards * and _. If the argument begins or ends with an asterisk character * (converted to '%' defined in JSR 317, section 4.6.10), it acts as a wild card, matching any characters preceding or following (respectively) that position. If the argument also contains an underscore character _ (JSR 317, section 4.6.10), it acts as a wildcard, matching exactly one character. It corresponds to the percentage, respectively underscore wildcard of the LIKE condition in SQL.

Examples of RSQL

I guess that some practical example will come handy. Below is a truncated output from my RESTful service KOSapi.

<atom:feed xml:lang="en" xml:base="https://kosapi.fit.cvut.cz/api/3/">
    ...
    <atom:entry>
        <atom:title>Web Services and Middleware</atom:title>
        <atom:id>https://kosapi.fit.cvut.cz/api/3/courses/MI-MDW</atom:id>
        ...
        <atom:content xsi:type="kos:course" atom:type="xml">
            <code>MI-MDW</code>
            <completion>CREDIT_EXAM</completion>
            <credits>4</credits>
            <name>Web Services and Middleware</name>
            <season>WINTER</season>
            <department xlink:href="units/18102">Department of Software Engineering</department>
            ...
        </atom:content>
    </atom:entry>
    ...
</atom:feed>

Now some real examples of RSQL queries.

finds courses which...
- /courses?query=code==MI-MDW - code matches MI-MDW
- /courses?query=name==*services* - name contains "services"
- /courses?query=name=='web services*' - name begins with "web services"
- /courses?query=credits>3 - is for more than 3 credits
- /courses?query=name==*web*;season==WINTER;(completion==CLFD_CREDIT,completion==CREDIT_EXAM) - name contains "web" and season is "WINTER" and completion is CLFD_CREDIT or CREDIT_EXAM
- /courses?query=department.id==18102 - is related with department id 18102
- /courses?query=department.name==*engineering - is guaranteed by the department that name ends to "engineering"
- /courses?query=name==*services*&orderBy=name&maxResults=50 - name contains "services", order by name and limit output to maximum 50 results

Maven

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.github.tennaito</groupId>
    <artifactId>rsql-jpa</artifactId>
    <version>2.0.2</version>
</dependency>

License

This project is licensed under MIT license.

Change log

  • (2.0.2) Minor changes;
  • (2.0.1) Added Embeddable property Path; Resolved thread safed of Data formatting; Minor updates;
  • (2.0.0) Correcting the design of the JPA Queries creation. That allows Hibernate provider to work correctly. When using Hibernate only use 4.3.10.Final or newer.
  • (1.0.2) Adding a Predicate Visitor.
  • (1.0.1) Added navigation through collection graphs.