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README.md

README.md

#The English globe being a stabil and immobil one, performing what the ordinary globes do, and much more / invented and described by the Right Honorable, the Earl of Castlemaine ; and now publish't by Joseph Moxon ...#

##Castlemaine, Roger Palmer, Earl of, 1634-1705.## The English globe being a stabil and immobil one, performing what the ordinary globes do, and much more / invented and described by the Right Honorable, the Earl of Castlemaine ; and now publish't by Joseph Moxon ... Castlemaine, Roger Palmer, Earl of, 1634-1705.

##General Summary##

Links

TCP catalogueHTMLEPUBPage images (Historical Texts)

Availability

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. This Phase I text is available for reuse, according to the terms of Creative Commons 0 1.0 Universal. The text can be copied, modified, distributed and performed, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission.

Major revisions

  1. 2006-07 TCP Assigned for keying and markup
  2. 2006-07 Apex CoVantage Keyed and coded from ProQuest page images
  3. 2006-08 Judith Siefring Sampled and proofread
  4. 2006-08 Judith Siefring Text and markup reviewed and edited
  5. 2006-09 pfs Batch review (QC) and XML conversion

##Content Summary##

#####Front##### The ENGLISH GLOBE Sch. 1

  1. TO THE READER Concerning this Globe, and the occaſion of the Inventing of it.

  2. A Poſtſcript concerning the Erratas, and the Geographical part of this GLOBE.

  3. An Advertiſement.

  4. The General Heads.

  5. The Explication of the Letters, &c. on Sch. 1.

#####Body#####

  1. THE Introduction.

  2. SECT. I. Solving many queſtions, relating to the Sun in our Elevation.

    _ Operation I. To ſet the Globe level or parallel to the Horizon.

    _ Operation II. To find the Suns Almucantar, or Height.

    _ OPERAT. III. To Compoſe the Globe, either by a Meridian Line, or without it, to the ſite of the World.

    _ OPERATION IV. To find the Day of the Month.

    _ OPERATION V. To find the Sun's Azimuth.

    _ OPERATION VI. To find the Sun's Declenſion, Parallel, and Place on the Globe at all times.

    _ OPERATION VII. To find the Sun's Bearing, i. e. in what part of the Heavens he lies, according to the Points of the Compaſs.

    _ OPERATION VIII. To find when the Sun comes to true Eaſt or Weſt, or any other Bearing.

    _ OPERATION IX. To find what Signs and Degrees of it the Sun is in, at any time.

    _ OPERATION X. To find the hour of the Day by the Sun, together with a ſecond way of compoſing the Globe, and finding the Globe, and finding the Day of the Moneth.

    _ OPERATION XI. To find the Hour of the Day when the Sun ſhines not.

    _ OPERATION XII. To know when the Sun riſes and ſets.

    _ OPERATION XIII. To find the Sun's Amplitude, Ortive or Occaſive.

    _ OPERATION XIV. To find the length of the Day and Night.

    _ OPERATION XV. To find the beginning and end of the Crepuſculum.

    _ OPERATION XVI. To find the Sun's Depreſſion at any time of the Night.

    _ OPERATION XVII. To find the Sun's Right Aſcenſion.

    _ OPERATION XVIII. To find the Aſcenſional Difference.

  3. SECT. II. Of the Operations that concern Geography.

    _ OPERATION I. How to find the Diſtance between any two places.

    _ OPERATION II. How to find the Latitude and Longitude of any Place.

    _ OPERATION III. How to find out any Place, the Longitude and Latitude being given.

    _ OPERATION IV. To find the ſituation of any Place according to the Angle of Poſition, or Points of the Compaſs.

    _ OPERATION. V. To find in what Clime or Parallel any Place lies.

    _ OPERATION VI. To know what a Clock 'tis at any time, in any place of the World.

    _ OPERATION VII. To find where 'tis Day, and where 'tis Night, all the World over.

    _ OPERATION VIII. To know where at that Moment of time the Inhabitants enjoy nothing but DAY, and where nothing but NIGHT; as alſo when the DAY and NIGHT will be thus perpetual in any place ſubject to this Alteration.

    _ OPERATION IX. To find where the Sun is Riſing, and where He is Setting, all the World over.

    _ OPERATION X. To find where the Sun is Vertical at any time, i. e. what People have him juſt over their Heads.

    _ OPERATION XI. To know where they are Riſing, where they are at Dinner, where at Supper, and where going to Bed all over the World.

    _ OPERATION XII. How much any People (if it be Day with them) are paſt Morning, or want of Evening; and (if it be Night with them) how much they are paſt Evening or want of Morning.

    _ OPERATION XIII. To find the Sun's height in any Place, where the Globe ſhews 'tis Day, or his Depreſſion where it ſhow's 'tis Night; as alſo what People throughout the World ſee the Sun, at the ſame Height.

    _ OPERATION XIV. To know what a Clock 'tis with you, the Italian, Babiloniſh, and Judaic way.

    _ OPERATION XV. How to make the Globe Univerſal.

    _ OPERATION. XVI. How to take the Elevation of the Pole in any place whatſoever.

    _ OPERATION XVII. How to know in what Elevation the Sun Riſes or Sets, an hour, or any other ſpace of time, earlier or later than he do's in the Globes Elevation.

  4. SECT. III. Of the Moon.

    _ OPERATION I. To find the Moon's Almucantar or Height.

    _ OPERATION II. To find the Moon's Azimuth.

    _ OPERATION. III. To find her true place on the Globe.

    _ OPERATION IV. To know the Moon's Declenſion from the Aequator.

    _ OPERATION V. To find the Moon's Diurnal Parallel, and conſequently how to Compoſe the Globe by the Moon.

    _ OPERATION. VI. To find the Moon's Bearing according to the Points of the Compaſſe.

    _ OPERATION VII. To know what a clock it is by the Moon.

    • The Abſtract of the Operation in finding the true Hour by the Moon according to the late Example.

    • Tables of the Diurnal Elongation of the Moon from the Sun, whether ſhe goes in 6½, 7, 7½, or 8 days, from one Cardinal Point to the other.

    _ OPERATION VIII. To know how many hours the Moon has been up, and how many ſhe lacks of her ſetting, as alſo how long ſhe is to be that day above the Horizon.

    _ OPERATION IX. To find at what at lack the Moon riſes and ſets.

    _ OPERATION X. To find how long the Moon ſhines every night.

    _ OPERATION XI. To find when the Moon comes to South, and conſequently when tis high water at London Bridge.

    _ OPERATION XII. To know in any Eclips of the Moon, what Countries ſee it wholly, what in part, and what not at all.

    _ OPERATION XIII. To repreſent the ſeveral Phaſes or Shapes of the Moon by the Globe.

    _ OPERATION XIV. How to find how long the Moon wants of any Change, or Cardinal Point, and conſequently how old ſhe is.

  5. SECT. IV. Shewing the Proportion between Perpendiculars and their Shades.

    _ OPERATION I. How to find the Proportion between the Perpendicular and its Shade.

    _ OPERATION II. How to find the height of a Tower by the Globe.

    _ OPERATION III. How by the help of your Globe to meaſure any Tower or height, and yet not▪ to ſeem to uſe any Inſtrument in the Operation.

    _ OPERATION IV. How to find the Hour by your Stick.

    _ OPERATION. V. How to to take an Angle in Altimetry by the Globe.

    _ OPERATION VI. How to make and figure the Quadrant of Proportion, as alſo the Demonſtration of the foregoing Operations.

  6. SECT. V. Of Dialling.

    _ OPERATION I.

    • How to deſcribe an Horizontal Dial by the Globe, for the Elevation of London.

    _ OPERATION II. How to deſcribe an Horizontal Dial by the Globe for the Elevation of London.

    _ OPERATION III. To deſcribe an Horizontal Dial Geometrically, for the Elevation of London.

    _ OPERATION. IV. How to draw a true meridian Line on any Horizontal Plane.

    _ OPERATION. V. How to Deſcribe a Vertical, or an Erect Direct South Dial by your Globe for the Elevation of London.

    _ OPERATION VI. How to make this Vertical South Dial by the Globe for the Elvation of London.

    _ OPERATION. VII. How to draw a Line Parallel to the Horizon; together with two ways how to place truly all paper Draughts on their reſpective Plane.

    _ OPERATION. VIII. How to make a Vertical or Erect Direct North Dial for the Elevation of London.

    _ OPERATION IX. To make the aforeſaid North and South Dials Geometrically, for the Elevation of London.

    _ OPERATION X. To deſcribe by the Globe, Meridian Dials, or (as others call them) Eaſt or Weſt Dials for the Elevation of London.

    _ OPERATION XII. How to deſcribe an Eaſt or Weſt Dial Geometrically for the Elevation of London.

    _ OPERATION XIII. How to deſcribe a Declining Dial by the Globe for the Elevation of London.

    _ OPERATION XIV. How to deſcribe by the Globe a Declining Dial for the Elevation of London.

    _ OPERATION. XV. How to deſcribe Geometrically a Declining Dial for the Elevation of London.

    _ OPERATION. XVI. How to deſcribe Geometrically a Dial declining 40 Degrees Eaſtward, for the Elevation of London.

    _ OPERATION XVII. To take the Declenſion of a Plane.

    • Of Reclining Dials.

    _ OPERATION XVIII. How to deſcribe a Dial on an Aequinoctial Plane, both by the Globe, and Geometrically alſo.

    _ OPERATION XIX. How to deſcribe a Polar Dial, both by the Globe, and Geometrically alſo.

    _ OPERATION XX. How to deſcribe a Direct reclining North or South Dial.

    _ OPERATION. XXI. How to make a Declining Reclining Dial by the Globe.

    _ OPERATION XXII. How to deſcribe by the Globe a Dial Declining and Reclining as the former, with a Northward Aſpect.

    _ OPERATION. XXIII. How to deſcribe all Inclining Dials, whether Direct or Declining.

    _ OPERATION. XXIV. How to find the Degrees of the Reclination or Inclination of any Plane by the Globe.

    _ OPERATION XXV. How to find how long the Sun can poſſibly ſhine on a Plane, as alſo (from time to time) when we may expect him after his Riſing to come on, or before his Setting to go off the ſaid Plane.

    • Of ſeveral ingenious and humerſome Dials.

    _ OPERATION XXVI▪ How to make a Dial on any Plane whoſe ſtile ſhall be an Arrow fixt caſually on it.

    _ OPERATION XXVII. How to make a Dial to ſhow the Hour without a ſtile on any Plane.

    _ OPERATION XXVIII. How to deſcribe a Dial, having a Picture of a Man in it, that ſhall Point to the Hour from time to time with his Finger.

    _ OPERATION XXIX. To make a Dial by which a Blind man may conſtantly know the Hour.

    _ OPERATION XXX. To make a Dial to ſhow the Hour when the Sun ſhines not.

    _ OPERATION XXXI. How to make an Horizontal Concave Dial by the Globe, and Geometrically alſo.

    _ OPERATION XXXII. How to deſcribe Geometrically a Cieling Dial.

    _ OPERATION XXXIII. To make a compound Dial to wit, one containing ſeveral uſeful Operations.

    • J. Moxon To the Reader.

I. Upon a Line given (AB) to erect (CD) a Perpendicular.

II. Upon (C) the end of (AC) a given Line, to draw (DC) a Perpendicular.

III. A Line (AB) being given how to draw (DG) a Parallel to it.

IV. To deſcribe a true Square.

V. To draw an Oblong, or (as they commonby call it) a Long Square.

VI. To Deſcribe an equilateral Triangle, or an Iſoſceles.

VII. To make a Triangle of three given Lines.

VIII. To deſcribe an Oval.

  * The Uſe of the LINE of LINES marked with L.

I. To divide a Line into any number of equal parts.

II. To find the proportion between any two Lines.

III. To divide a Line as any other Line propoſed is divided; that is to ſay, according to any Proportion.

IV. To encreaſe or diminiſh a Line in any Proportion.

V. Two Lines being given, to find a Third Proportional.

VI. Three Lines being given, to find a Fourth Proportional.

  * Of the Uſe of the LINE of SINES, markt with S.

I. How to find the Sine of any Angle, according to any Radius.

II. How to find the Chord of any Arch.

III. How to make an Angle of any value, as alſo how to find the value of any Angle already drawn.

  1. SECT. VI. Of the STARS.

    _ OPERATION I. To find the Declination of any Star.

    _ OPERATION II. To find the Right Aſcenſion of any Star, v. g. of the Lion's Heart.

    _ OPERATION III. To find the difference between the Suns Right Aſcenſion, and that of any Star, as alſo the Difference of the Right Aſcenſions of any two Stars.

    _ OPERATION IV. To find the Place of any Star on the Globe, i. e. the Point that correſponds with its then Place in the Heavens.

    _ OPERATION V. To find the Bearing of a Star at all times.

    _ OPERATION VI. To take the Almucantar or height of any Star you ſee.

    _ OPERATION VII. To find the height of a Star at any time, by the hour tho' unſeen.

    _ OPERATION VIII. To find the Azimuth of any Star.

    _ OPERATION IX. To know how many hours any Star ſtays above or under the Horizon.

    _ OPERATION X. To find when any Star Riſes or Sets.

    _ OPERATION. XI. To find what a Clock 'tis by any Star.

    _ OPERATION XII. To know the Name of any remarkable Star which you ſee.

    • Of the PEDESTAL.

    • The Explanation of the Circles and Lines of the whole Projection or Pedeſtal.

    • How to operate by the Projection or Pedeſtal.

    • How to Deſcribe the PROJECTION.

    • The Demonſtration.

  2. The Concluſion.

#####Back#####

  1. A Catalogue of GLOBES, Coeleſtial and Terreſtrial, Spheres, Maps, Sea-Plats, Mathematical Instruments, and Books, with their prizes, made and ſold by Joſeph Moxon, on Ludgate-Hill, at the Sign of Atlas.

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  • Oh, Mr. Jourdain, there is prose in there!

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18. q 1
19. row 62
20. signed 1
21. table 7
22. trailer 6