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OS X cross toolchain for Linux, FreeBSD and NetBSD
C++ C Shell
branch: master

wrapper:

* minor fixes
* prepare for unit tests
latest commit 8543a46c6c
@tpoechtrager authored

README.md

OS X Cross toolchain for Linux, FreeBSD and NetBSD

WHAT IS THE GOAL OF OSXCROSS?

The goal of OSXCross is to provide a well working OS X cross toolchain for Linux, FreeBSD and NetBSD.

HOW DOES IT WORK?

Clang/LLVM is a cross compiler by default and is now available on nearly every Linux distribution,
so we just need a proper port of the cctools (ld, lipo, ...) and the OS X SDK.

If you want, then you can build an up-to-date vanilla GCC as well.

WHAT CAN I BUILD WITH IT?

Basically everything you can build on OS X with clang/gcc should build with this cross toolchain as well.

PACKET MANAGERS

OSXCross comes with a minimalistic MacPorts Packet Manager.
Please see README.MACPORTS for more.

INSTALLATION:

Move your packaged SDK to the tarballs/ directory.

Then ensure you have the following installed on your Linux/BSD box:

Clang 3.2+, llvm-devel, patch, libxml2-devel (<=10.5 only),
uuid-devel, openssl-devel and the bash shell.

--
You can run 'sudo tools/get_dependencies.sh' to get these automatically.

'[INSTALLPREFIX=...] ./build_clang.sh' can be used to build a recent clang version
from source (requires gcc and g++).

On debian like systems you can also use llvm.org/apt to get a newer version of clang.
But be careful, that repository is known to cause troubles.
--

Then run ./build.sh to build the cross toolchain.
(It will search 'tarballs' for your SDK and then build in its own directory.)

Do not forget to add <path>/target/bin to your PATH variable.

That's it. See usage examples below.

Building GCC:

If you want to build GCC as well, then you can do this by running:
[GCC_VERSION=5.1.0] [ENABLE_FORTRAN=1] ./build_gcc.sh.

[A gfortran usage example can be found here]

But before you do this, make sure you have got the GCC build depedencies installed on your system.

On debian like systems you can run:

[sudo] apt-get install gcc g++ zlib1g-dev libmpc-dev libmpfr-dev libgmp-dev

to install them.

ATTENTION:

OSXCross links libgcc and libstdc++ statically by default (this affects -oc-use-gcc-libs too).
You can turn this behavior off with OSXCROSS_GCC_NO_STATIC_RUNTIME=1 (env).

PACKAGING THE SDK:

If you need a recent SDK, then you must do the SDK packaging on OS X.
Recent Xcode images are compressed, but the Linux kernel does not
support HFS+ compression.

Packaging the SDK on an OS X machine:
  1. [Download Xcode **]
  2. [Mount Xcode.dmg (Open With -> DiskImageMounter) ***]
  3. Run: ./tools/gen_sdk_package.sh (from the OSXCross package)
  4. Copy the packaged SDK (*.tar.* or *.pkg) on a USB Stick
  5. (On Linux/BSD) Copy or move the SDK into the tarballs/ directory of OSXCross

** Xcode 4.6, 5.0+, 6.0, and the 6.1 Betas are known to work.
*** If you get a dialog with a crossed circle, ignore it, you don't need to install Xcode.

Step 1. and 2. can be skipped if you have Xcode installed.

Packing the SDK on a Linux machine (does NOT work with Xcode 4.3 or later!):
  1. Download Xcode 4.2 for Snow Leopard **
  2. Ensure you are downloading the "Snow Leopard" version
  3. Install dmg2img
  4. Run (as root): ./tools/mount_xcode_image.sh /path/to/xcode.dmg
  5. Follow the instructions printed by ./tools/mount_xcode_image.sh
  6. Copy or move the SDK into the tarballs/ directory

** SHA1 Sum: 1a06882638996dfbff65ea6b4c6625842903ead3.

USAGE EXAMPLES:

Let's say you want to compile a file called test.cpp, then you can do this by running:
  • Clang:

    • 32 bit: o32-clang++ test.cpp -O3 -o test OR i386-apple-darwinXX-clang++ test.cpp -O3 -o test
    • 64 bit: o64-clang++ test.cpp -O3 -o test OR x86_64-apple-darwinXX-clang++ test.cpp -O3 -o test
  • GCC:

    • 32 bit: o32-g++ test.cpp -O3 -o test OR i386-apple-darwinXX-g++ test.cpp -O3 -o test
    • 64 bit: o64-g++ test.cpp -O3 -o test OR x86_64-apple-darwinXX-g++ test.cpp -O3 -o test

XX= the target version, you can find it out by running osxcross-conf and then see TARGET.

You can use the shortcut o32-... or i386-apple-darwin... what ever you like more.

I'll continue from now on with o32-clang, but remember, you can simply replace it with o32-gcc or i386-apple-darwin....

Building Makefile based projects:
  • make CC=o32-clang CXX=o32-clang++
Building automake based projects:
  • CC=o32-clang CXX=o32-clang++ ./configure --host=i386-apple-darwinXX
Building test.cpp with libc++:

Note: libc++ requires Mac OS X 10.7 or newer! If you really need C++11 for
an older OS X version, then you can do the following:

  1. Build GCC so you have an up-to-date libstdc++
  2. Build your source code with GCC or with clang and '-oc-use-gcc-libs'

Usage Examples:

  • Clang:

    • C++98: o32-clang++ -stdlib=libc++ test.cpp -o test
    • C++11: o32-clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++11 tes1.cpp -o test
    • C++1y: o32-clang++ -stdlib=libc++ -std=c++1y test1.cpp -o test
  • Clang (shortcut):

    • C++98: o32-clang++-libc++ test.cpp -o test
    • C++11: o32-clang++-libc++ -std=c++11 test.cpp -o test
    • C++1y: o32-clang++-libc++ -std=c++1y test.cpp -o test
  • GCC (defaults to C++11 with libc++)

    • C++11: o32-g++-libc++ test.cpp
    • C++1y: o32-g++-libc++ -std=c++1y test.cpp -o test
Building test1.cpp and test2.cpp with LTO (Link Time Optimization):
  • build the first object file: o32-clang++ test1.cpp -O3 -flto -c
  • build the second object file: o32-clang++ test2.cpp -O3 -flto -c
  • link them with LTO: o32-clang++ -O3 -flto test1.o test2.o -o test
Building a universal binary:
  • Clang:
    • o64-clang++ test.cpp -O3 -arch i386 -arch x86_64 -o test
  • GCC:
    • build the 32 bit binary: o32-g++ test.cpp -O3 -o test.i386
    • build the 64 bit binary: o64-g++ test.cpp -O3 -o test.x86_64
    • use lipo to generate the universal binary: x86_64-apple darwinXX-lipo -create test.i386 test.x86_64 -output test

DEPLOYMENT TARGET:

The default deployment target is Mac OS X 10.5.

However, there are several ways to override the default value:

  1. by passing OSX_VERSION_MIN=10.x to ./build.sh
  2. by passing -mmacosx-version-min=10.x to the compiler
  3. by setting the MACOSX_DEPLOYMENT_TARGET environment variable

>= 10.9 also defaults to libc++ instead of libstdc++, this behavior
can be overriden by explicitly passing -stdlib=libstdc++ to clang.

x86_64h defaults to Mac OS X 10.8 and requires clang 3.5+.
x86_64h = x86_64 with optimizations for the Intel Haswell Architecture.

LICENSE:

  • scripts/wrapper: GPLv2
  • cctools/ld64: APSL 2.0
  • xar: New BSD

CREDITS:

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