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Python decorator helper library.
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README.rst

Decorum

https://travis-ci.org/zeekay/decorum.png?branch=master

Decorum is a simple tool which aims to make it easier to write flexible and simple decorators. It can also act similarly to functools.wraps.

Typical usage looks like this:

>>> from __future__ import print_function
>>> from decorum import decorator

>>> @decorator
... class my_decorator:
...    def wraps(self, f):
...        print("I'm returning the function! You can keep it!")
...        return f

Decorum lets you write decorators with and without arguments in a unified way. Your decorator can be used with or without arguments, called or not, and it will work the same way:

>>> @my_decorator
... def foo(x):
...     print(x)
I'm returning the function! You can keep it!

>>> foo('bar')
bar

Is identical to:

>>> @my_decorator()
... def foo(x):
...     print(x)
I'm returning the function! You can keep it!

Writing decorators

Decorum provides two easy ways to write your own decorators. You can use decorum.decorator to decorate decorator classes, or you can directly subclass decorum.Decorum. There are only two methods to be aware of when writing your own decorators. Define a wraps method to handle the actual decoration and return the decorated function, and optionally define an init method to handle any arguments you want to accept, and handle basic setup (it's called before decoration by __init__, you can use it in a similar fashion to a real __init__ method).

Here is a slightly fancier example:

>>> from decorum import decorator

>>> @decorator
... class fancy:
...     def init(self, arg=None):
...         self.arg = arg
...
...     def wraps(self, f):
...         if self.arg:
...             def newf():
...                 print(self.arg)
...         else:
...             def newf():
...                 print('wut')
...         return newf

>>> @fancy
... def foo():
...     pass

>>> foo()
wut

>>> @fancy('woof')
... def foo():
...     pass

>>> foo()
woof

By default decorum will try to keep assign certain attributes to the wrapped function for you, namely __doc__ and __name__.

>>> import decorum

>>> @decorum.decorator
... class identity(object):
...     """Noop decorator: does nothing!"""

>>> @identity
... def my_function():
...     """My function's docstring."""

>>> print(my_function.__name__)
my_function
>>> print(my_function.__doc__)
My function's docstring.

The optional assigned keyword argument can be used to to specify which attributes of the original function are assigned directly to the matching attributes on the wrapper function. This defaults to ('__doc__', '__name__'). You can specify False or None to disable this.

>>> @identity(assigned=None)
... def my_function():
...     """My function's docstring."""

>>> print(my_function.__name__)
>>> print(my_function.__doc__)
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