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Fable Node client for Microsoft SQL Server, built around a node-mssql binding
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README.md

Fable.SqlClient Nuget Build status

Fable binding for node-mssql, Microsoft SQL Server client library with an idiomatic and type-safe F# API to be used from Fable Node applications.

Installation

Install the Fable binding from Nuget

# using nuget
dotnet add package Fable.SqlClient

# or with paket
paket add Fable.SqlClient --project /path/to/project.fsproj

Install the actual node-mssql from Npm

npm install --save node-mssql

Getting started

First of all, configure the connection using SqlConfig:

open Fable.SqlClient

let connectionConfig = 
    [ SqlConfig.User "admin"
      SqlConfig.Password "str0ngPa$$word"
      SqlConfig.Host "localhost"
      SqlConfig.Database "AdventuresWorks"
      SqlConfog.Port 1433 ]

Sql.readRows querying a tabular result set

open Fable.SqlClient
open Fable.SqlClient.OptionWorkflow

type User = { Id: int; Name: string }
 
let getUsers() : Async<Option<User list>> = 
    async {
        let! usersResult = 
          connectionConfig
          |> Sql.connect
          |> Sql.query "SELECT id, name from [dbo].[Users]" 
          |> Sql.readRows (fun row -> 
                option {
                    let! id = Sql.readInt "id" row
                    let! name = Sql.readString "name" row
                    return { Id = id; Name = name; }   
                })

        match usersResult with 
        | Ok users -> return Some users 
        | Error sqlError -> return None
    }

Here Sql.readRows takes a transformer function that maps every row into an Option<'t>. Because we are using the option workflow, the mapping is done safely and if either id or name is null, then the row is skipped.

If you want to handle the null values manually, then simply use let instead of let! in combination with defaultArg. For example, if you want to use an empty string as a default for the name column, then you simply write the following:

async {
    let! usersResult = 
      connectionConfig
      |> Sql.connect
      |> Sql.query "SELECT id, name from [dbo].[Users]" 
      |> Sql.readRows (fun row -> 
            option {
                let! id = Sql.readInt "id" row
                // notice: no ! in the let binding
                let name = Sql.readString "name" row
                let nameOrEmpty = defaultArg name ""
                return { Id = id; Name = nameOrEmpty; }   
            })

    match usersResult with 
    | Ok users -> return Some users 
    | Error sqlError -> return None
}

Sql.readRows from a parameterized query

Queries can be parameterized with named parameters to avoid SQL injections:

open Fable.SqlClient
open Fable.SqlClient.OptionWorkflow

let userByUsername (username: string) : Async<User option> = 
    async {
        let! results = 
            connectionConfig
            |> Sql.connect
            |> Sql.query "SELECT TOP 1 id, name from [dbo].[Users] where name = @name"
            |> Sql.parameters [ SqlParam.From ("@name", username) ]
            |> Sql.readRows (fun row ->
                option {
                    let! id = Sql.readInt "id" row
                    let! name = Sql.readString "name" row
                    return { Id = id; Name = name }
                })

        match results with 
        | Ok (user :: _) -> return Some user 
        | _ -> return None
    }

Sql.readScalar querying a scalar value

open Fable.SqlClient

let pingDatabase() : Async<DateTime option> = 
    async {
        let! serverTime = 
            connectionConfig
            |> Sql.connect
            |> Sql.query "SELECT GETDATE()"
            |> Sql.readScalar 

        match serverTime with 
        | Ok (SqlValue.Date time) -> return Some time
        | _ -> return None
    }

Sql.storedProcedure

executing a stored procedure with parameters

let userExists (name: string) : Async<bool> = 
    async {
        let! exists = 
            connectionConfig
            |> Sql.connect
            |> Sql.storedProcedure "user_exists"
            |> Sql.parameters [ SqlParam.From("@name", name) ]
            |> Sql.readScalar 

        match exists with 
        | Ok (SqlValue.Bool value) -> return value
        | _ -> return false
    }

Sql.readAffectedRows

Returns the number of rows affected. For example when you execute a DELETE, INSERT or UPDATE statements, the rows affected will the ones that were deleted, inserted or updated. If you read the rows affected by a SELECT statements, the row count is returned.

/// delete events older than 2 months
let deleteOldEvents() : Async<Result<int, string>> = 
    async {
        let! eventsDeleted = 
            connectionConfig
            |> Sql.connect
            |> Sql.query "DELETE FROM [dbo].[Events] WHERE DateAdded < @TwoMonthsAgo"
            |> Sql.parameters [ SqlParam.From("@TwoMonthsAgo", DateTime.Now.AddMonths(-2)) ]
            |> Sql.readAffectedRows 

        match eventsDeleted with 
        | Ok count -> return Ok count
        | Error error -> 
            // Extract info from the SqlError
            let (errType, errMsg, errStack) = error.Info()
            return Error errMsg      
    }

Sql.readJson

Since Microsoft SQL Server supports JSON natively, you can query the database and have it return the result set as a single JSON string. Sql.readJson is a utility function that extracts the JSON from the scalar value. You can then parse the resulting serialized JSON using your favorite Json library:

async {
    let! json =
        connectionConfig
        |> Sql.connect
        |> Sql.query "SELECT id, name FROM (VALUES(42, N'Fable')) as TableName(id, name) FOR JSON PATH"
        |> Sql.readJson 
    
    match json with 
    | Ok serialized = 
        let values = Json.parseAs<{| id: int; name: string |} array> serialized
        let value = values.[0] 
        printfn "Id = %d and Name = %s" value.id value.name
    
    | Error error -> 
        printfn "Something went wrong..."
}

API definitions

val Sql.readRows : ((string * SqlValue) list -> Option<'t>) -> (props: ISqlProps) -> Async<Result<'t list, SqlError>>

val Sql.readAffectedRows (props: ISqlProps) -> Async<Result<int, SqlError>>

val Sql.readJson (props: ISqlProps) -> Async<Result<string, SqlError>> 

val Sql.readScalar (props: ISqlProps) -> Async<Result<SqlValue, SqlError>>

where the important types are defined as follows. The types within SqlValue are those that you can read from Sql Server.

type SqlValue = 
    | TinyInt of uint8
    | SmallInt of int16
    | Int of int 
    | Bool of bool
    | Date of DateTime
    | UniqueIdentifier of Guid 
    | BigInt of int64
    | Decimal of decimal  
    | String of string 
    | Number of float 
    | Binary of byte[]
    | Null

    
type SqlError = 
    | ConnectionError of message: string * stack: string
    | TransactionError of message: string * stack: string 
    | RequestError of message: string * stack: string 
    | ApplicationError of message: string * stack: string 
    | GenericError of errorType: string * message: string * stack: string

the type ISqlProps is just a helper type that accumulate the configuration for a query using a fluent syntax

Developement and Testing

The test project is in the test directory and includes integration tests. To run these tests on your local machine, you will need to setup a couple of environment variables:

  • SQLCLIENT_DATABASE: the name of the database to run the tests against. The tests don't require a specific database, you can just use master.
  • SQLCLIENT_SERVER: the IP address of the hosting machine, if you have a local MSSQL server, then local/{instance} will do
  • SQLCLIENT_USER: the username to log in with
  • SQLCLIENT_PASSWORD: the password of the user

After you have set up these variables, you can run the commands:

npm install 
npm test

This will compile the test the project and runs tests using Mocha.

Known issues

Reading DateTimeOffset directly is not supported. It has to be converted to nvarchar first and parsed from SqlValue.String value. However, a DateTimeOffset value can still be used as a parameter value directly. The following test demonstrates what's supported:

testCaseAsync "DateTimeOffset round trip works" <| fun () -> 
    async {
        let input = DateTimeOffset.UtcNow
        let! value = 
            defaultConfig
            |> Sql.connect 
            // convert the value to nvarchar
            |> Sql.query "SELECT CONVERT(nvarchar(100), @DateTimeOffset) as [Value]"
            |> Sql.parameters [ SqlParam.From("@DateTimeOffset", input) ]
            |> Sql.readScalar 

        match value with 
        // parse the value here
        | Ok (SqlValue.String serialized) -> 
            let deserialized = DateTimeOffset.Parse serialized 
            areEqual input deserialized
        
        | otherwise -> return! failwithf "Unexpected results:\n%s" (Json.stringify otherwise)
    }
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