Archived, out-of-date website for a machine translation course
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README.md

Machine Translation Course Material

This directory contains a complete set of course material for a senior undergraduate or graduate-level course in machine translation. It was last updated in spring 2017, and I have no plans to update it again. It will probably be completely out of date within a few years. With that caveat in mind:

All of this material is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License You are free to reuse it any way you like if you acknowledge that you got it from us:

The current fork of these files was used to teach the machine translation course at Johns Hopkins University in 2012 and 2014 and at the University of Edinburgh between 2015 and 2017 by Adam Lopez. The materials evolved substantially over that time, and reflect the 2017 offering of the course.

Keynote source for slides

The keynote source files are under assets/keynote.

Homework Assignments and Labs

There are two sets of homework assignments: one for phrase-based statistical machine translation, and a newer one for neural MT.

The code and data for the older homework assignments are maintained by Adam Lopez and distributed under an MIT License. Feel free to reuse them! DREAMT: Decoding, Reranking, Evaluation, and Alignment for Machine Translation

The code and data for the newer neural MT homework assignments was developed by Ida Szubert and Sameer Bansal, and appears in the course repository. Text for the three assignments can be found in this repository.

Web-Based Stack Decoder

A web-based live demo of the classic stack decoding algorithm used in word-based statistical machine translation was also used in the class. The code is maintained by Matt Post, and you can get it here.

Building the course page for Edinburgh Informatics

The School of Informatics manages updates to the website through cvs. To comply with this unspeakable requirement, while still staying sane by writing content in markdown for jekyll and managing everything using git, I use the following process:

# Set $CVSROOT
export CVSROOT=:pserver:<username>@www.inf.ed.ac.uk:/cvsroot

# Check out both cvs and git versions of the repo
cvs login
cvs checkout web/teaching/courses/mt
git cvsimport -d $CVSROOT -C inf-mt -r cvs -k web/teaching/courses/mt

# Configure the git clone of the cvs repo
cd inf-mt
git config cvsimport.module web/teaching/courses/mt
git config cvsimport.r cvs
git config cvsimport.d $CVSROOT

# Now, I can make changes as needed in this repository. If I want
# to preview the results locally, I just run "jekyll build". When
# I'm ready to commit the changes to the informatics server, I build
# using a special config file that overwrites the git copy of the
# the class directory, and then commit it from there using the git
# bridge to cvs, like so:
cd mt-class
jekyll build --config _config4inf.yml
cd ../inf-mt
git commit -am <commit message>
git cvsexportcommit -w ../web/teaching/courses/mt -u -p -c HEAD^ HEAD

Much of the process was adapted from this stackoverflow question.