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demos
README
VERSION
color2overlay
txt2color

README

########10########20########30### 0. CONTENTS ##50########60########70########80

0. CONTENTS . . . . . Table of contents.
1. INTRODUCTION . . . Overview & introduction to color2overlay.
2. INSTALLATION . . . Installation instructions.
3. USAGE  . . . . . . Usage instructions.
4. MASKING  . . . . . Guide to the "masking" feature, with examples.
5. txt2color  . . . . Guide to the txt2color utility, with examples.
6. LICENSE  . . . . . Software license.

########10########20########30# 1. INTRODUCTION 50########60########70########80

color2overlay is a fun little program which accepts a sequence of hexadecimal
color codes, and produces a number of rectangles of the given colors, evenly
sized and distributed in the center of the resulting image. color2overlay
supports changing the margin around the drawing area (the region where the
rectangles are drawn), changing the canvas size, changing the width of the
rectangles, and applying translucency and blur effects. The result can
optionally be overlaid on top of an existing image, or saved directly for
futher processing by other programs. color2overlay also supports applying
bitmasks to the R, G, and B channels separately.

color2overly is not meant to be useful, and is intended to be an entertaining
means of generating wallpapers, avatars, and the like.

For examples of the output, please see the ./demos directory.


########10########20########30# 2. INSTALLATION 50########60########70########80

color2overlay runs as a simple standalone python program, requiring only
minimal dependencies, namely Pillow and colormap, which can both be obtained
from pip, or your distro's package manager. color2overlay targets Python 3; use
of Python 2.X and/or PIL (rather than Pillow) may or may not work.

With the dependancies installed, you can simply run color2overlay directly with
no further special setup.


########10########20########30#### 3. USAGE ####50########60########70########80

usage: color2overlay [-h] [--verbose] [--debug]
                     [--canvas-size-x CANVAS_SIZE_X]
                     [--canvas-size-y CANVAS_SIZE_Y] [--margin MARGIN]
                     [--input-colors INPUT_COLORS] [--alpha ALPHA]
                     [--width WIDTH] --output-file OUTPUT_FILE
                     [--filter-blur FILTER_BLUR] [--mask-r MASK_R]
                     [--mask-g MASK_G] [--mask-b MASK_B] [--add-r ADD_R]
                     [--add-g ADD_G] [--add-b ADD_B]
                     [--background-image BACKGROUND_IMAGE]

A tool for generating pretty images from sets of colors. Accepts a newline-
delimited list of hexadecimal color codes (example: #636F6C) either on
standard in (by default), or from a file. Renders each color as a colored
rectangle into an image.

optional arguments:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  --verbose, -v         Display verbose output on stderr
  --debug, -d           Display debug output on stderr
  --canvas-size-x CANVAS_SIZE_X, -x CANVAS_SIZE_X
                        Canvas size on the X axis in pixels (default: 1920)
  --canvas-size-y CANVAS_SIZE_Y, -y CANVAS_SIZE_Y
                        Canvas size on the Y axis in pixels (default: 1080
  --margin MARGIN, -m MARGIN
                        Space between rectangles and canvas edge in pixels
                        (default: 200)
  --input-colors INPUT_COLORS, -c INPUT_COLORS
                        Input file for colors, 'stdin' for standard in
                        (default: stdin)
  --alpha ALPHA, -a ALPHA
                        Set the alpha channel for input colors (default: 255)
  --width WIDTH, -w WIDTH
                        Percentage of maximum rectangle width to use (default:
                        0.8)
  --output-file OUTPUT_FILE, -o OUTPUT_FILE
                        Output file name, including extension. Note that PNG
                        format is always used
  --filter-blur FILTER_BLUR
                        If nonzero, apply a Gaussian blur filter with the
                        specified radius (default: 0)
  --mask-r MASK_R       Apply bitmask to the red channel
  --mask-g MASK_G       Apply bitmask to the green channel
  --mask-b MASK_B       Apply bitmask to the blue channel
  --add-r ADD_R         Add this int to the red channel, will not exceed 255
                        in total
  --add-g ADD_G         Add this int to the green channel, will not exceed 255
                        in total
  --add-b ADD_B         Add this int to the blue channel, will not exceed 255
                        in total
  --background-image BACKGROUND_IMAGE, -i BACKGROUND_IMAGE
                        Superimpose the result over a background image

########10########20########30### 4. MASKING ###50########60########70########80

color2overlay supports an interesting feature - it can individually apply a
bitmask to each of the R, G, and B channels separately, and can also optionally
add on to the value of each channel individually. This feature is useful for
forcing the resulting image to have a particular hue, or elimiting a certain
hue from the result.

For those unfamiliar, bit-masking essentially allows one to define "gates"
through which certain bits may or may not pass. Thus, for a given bit with a
mask of 1, the output will be whatever the input bit was. For a given bit with
a mask of 0, the output will always be zero. Lets consider some examples using
Python (note that the & operator in python is the "bitwise AND" operator).

>>> bin(0b1111 & 0b1010)
'0b1010'
>>> bin(0b0011 & 0b1010)
'0b10'
>>> bin(0b0000 & 0b1010)
'0b0'
>>> bin(0b1100 & 0b1010)
'0b1000'

This is exactly the functionality we are tapping into via the --mask-* options
- each channel (red, green, and blue) for each color read as input is
represented as a byte (0-255). By applying a mask to the byte, we can drop the
intensity of that channel.

As an example, lets say you wanted to reduce the amount of red hues in your
input colors. You could "mask out" the two most significant bits of the red
channel by using the mask `--mask-r 0b00111111` (note that color2overlay
supports Python's binary number notation, or base-10 integers as input for
masks). To see what this looks like, compare the files:

demos/color2overlay.png
demos/color2overlay_mask-r.png

The former is unmodified, and the latter was processed with `--mask-r
0b00111111`.

On the other hand, you might want to intensify the color on a particular
channel.  This can be accomplished with the `--add-*` options. These add an
integer number to the specified channel, then set that channel equal to either
255, or the channel value plus the added value - whichever is lower.

As an example, lets consider the image from the previous example. Perhaps we
might want a more intense green to come through, so we will process it with
`--add-g 32 --mask-r 0b00111111`. To see the result, compare the two files
from the previous example, as well as the file:

demos/color2overlay_mask-r_add-g.png

########10########20########30## 5. txt2color ##50########60########70########80

As a helpful aid, a utility is included with color2overlay - `txt2color`. This
tool will accept on standard input arbitrary text, and will emit as output
a list of hexadecimal color codes suitable for consumption by color2overlay.
The tool operates by taking the ordinal value of each character read, grouping
them into tuples of three values, then converting these tuples to hex color
codes.

Note that if the input text has a number of characters which is not a multiple
of 3, the remaining characters are padded as NULL.

Example 1:

$ echo "color2overlay" | ./txt2color
#636F6C
#6F7232
#6F7665
#726C61
#790A00

Example 2:

$ echo "color2overlay" |./txt2color | ./color2overlay --output demos/color2overlay.png

########10########20########30### 6. LICENSE ###50########60########70########80

Copyright (c) 2017, Charles Daniels
All rights reserved.

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:

1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice,
this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice,
this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation
and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

3. Neither the name of the copyright holder nor the names of its
contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this
software without specific prior written permission.

THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS "AS IS"
AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE
ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT HOLDER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE
LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF
SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS
INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN
CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE)
ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE
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