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Contributing to CVXPY

This document is a guide to contributing to CVXPY.

We welcome all contributions. You don't need to be an expert in optimization to help out.

Checklist

Contributions are made through pull requests. Before sending a pull request, make sure you do the following:

Building CVXPY from source

You'll need to build CVXPY locally in order to start editing code. We recommend that you do this in a fresh virtual environment.

To install CVXPY from source, clone the Github repository, navigate to the repository root, and run the following command:

python setup.py develop

Contributing code

To contribute to CVXPY, send us pull requests. For those new to contributing, check out Github's guide.

Once you've made your pull request, a member of the CVXPY development team will assign themselves to review it. You might have a few back-and-forths with your reviewer before it is accepted, which is completely normal. Your pull request will trigger continuous integration tests for many different Python versions and different platforms. If these tests start failing, please fix your code and send another commit, which will re-trigger the tests.

If you'd like to add a new feature to CVXPY, or a new example to our library, please do propose your change on a Github issue, to make sure that your priorities align with ours.

If you'd like to contribute code but don't know where to start, try one of the following:

  • Read the CVXPY source and enhance the documentation, or address TODOs
  • Browse the issue tracker, and look for the issues tagged "help wanted".
  • Polish the example library or add new examples
  • Add a benchmark

CVXPY supports Python 2.7 and Python 3, so please make sure your code is compatible with both.

License

Please add the following license to new files:

"""
Copyright, the CVXPY authors

Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
You may obtain a copy of the License at

    http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0

Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
limitations under the License.
"""

Code style

We use flake8 to enforce our Python coding style. Before sending us a pull request, navigate to the project root and run

flake8 cvxpy/

to make sure that your changes abide by our style conventions. Please fix any errors that flake8 reports before sending the pull request.

Writing unit tests

Most code changes will require new unit tests. (Even bug fixes require unit tests, since the presence of bugs usually indicates insufficient tests.) CVXPY tests live in the directory cvxpy/tests, which contains many files, each of which contains many unit tests. When adding tests, try to find a file in which your tests should belong; if you're testing a new feature, you might want to create a new test file.

We use the standard Python unittest framework for our tests. Tests are organized into classes, which inherit from BaseTest (see cvxpy/tests/base_test.py). Every method beginning with test_ is a unit test.

Running unit tests

We use nose to run our unit tests, which you can install with pip install nose. To run all unit tests, cd into cvxpy/tests and run the following command:

nosetests

To run tests in a specific file (e.g., test_dgp.py), use

nosetests test_dgp.py

To run a specific test method (e.g., TestDgp.test_product), use

nosetests test_dgp.py:TestDgp.test_product

Please make sure that your change doesn't cause any of the unit tests to fail.

nosetests supresses stdout by default. To see stdout, pass the -s flag to nosetests.

Benchmarks

CVXPY has a few benchmarks in cvxpy/tests/test_benchmarks.py, which test the time to canonicalize problems. Please run

nosetests -s test_benchmarks.py

with and without your change, to make sure no performance regressions are introduced. If you are making a code contribution, please include the output of the above command (with and without your change) in your pull request.

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