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Java API for creating applications for Logitech's LCD gaming keyboards such as the G19 and G15
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README.md

Java API for the Logitech LCD G19 gaming keyboard

David Powell djpowell@djpowell.net 2010-04-11

http://github.com/djpowell/lcdjni

This software is distributed under the MIT licence.


New download location: http://djpowell.net/files/lcdjni-1.0.0-rc5.zip

Description

An API for writing applets for the Logitech G19 LCD gaming keyboard.

This package provides a JNI DLL which is used by a Java API to allow applets to draw on the screen, read the softkeys, and subscribe to events. This API is a wrapper around the lglcd.h C API, so familiarity with that API may help in undestanding it.

The API should also support other compatible devices, including black & white devices such as the Logitech G15 Keyboard, but this hasn't currently been tested.


Deployment

If you are using a 32-bit JVM, you must use the 32-bit DLL.

If you are using a 64-bit JVM, you must use the 64-bit DLL.

For most client applications, the 32-bit JVM is probably the most suitable, as the 64-bit JVM doesn't currently provide a client VM in addition to the server VM.

The correct DLL should be included on the library path. The easiest way to do this is by copying it to the working directory of your application's executable jar or script. Alternatively you can use the startup flag:

-Djava.libary.path=<directory-containing-the-dll>

Running the examples

Three examples are provided:

  net.djpowell.lcdjni.examples.HelloWorld
  net.djpowell.lcdjni.examples.HelloWorldMono
  net.djpowell.lcdjni.examples.HelloWorldDual
  net.djpowell.lcdjni.examples.EventTest

To run the examples using a 32-bit JVM:

  java -cp lcdjni.jar;lcdjni-examples.jar -Djava.library.path=x86 net.djpowell.lcdjni.examples.HelloWorld
  java -cp lcdjni.jar;lcdjni-examples.jar -Djava.library.path=x86 net.djpowell.lcdjni.examples.HelloWorldMono
  java -cp lcdjni.jar;lcdjni-examples.jar -Djava.library.path=x86 net.djpowell.lcdjni.examples.HelloWorldDual
  java -cp lcdjni.jar;lcdjni-examples.jar -Djava.library.path=x86 net.djpowell.lcdjni.examples.EventTest

To run the examples using a 64-bit JVM:

  java -cp lcdjni.jar;lcdjni-examples.jar -Djava.library.path=x64 net.djpowell.lcdjni.examples.HelloWorld
  java -cp lcdjni.jar;lcdjni-examples.jar -Djava.library.path=x64 net.djpowell.lcdjni.examples.HelloWorldMono
  java -cp lcdjni.jar;lcdjni-examples.jar -Djava.library.path=x64 net.djpowell.lcdjni.examples.HelloWorldDual
  java -cp lcdjni.jar;lcdjni-examples.jar -Djava.library.path=x64 net.djpowell.lcdjni.examples.EventTest

Notes

LCD Manager uses the executable name of your process to support auto startable applications. Therefore, it only makes sense to pass 'true' to the isAutoStartable parameter of the LcdConnection constructor if you have some way to start your java application using a command-line that doesn't require parameters. For example, by launching Java using the JNI invocation API.

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