{{ mustache }} templates for Clojure[Script].
Clojure
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Latest commit 228c89f Oct 1, 2016 @fotoetienne Add tags function
Returns all tags in a template

README.md

Cljstache

{{ mustache }} templates for Clojure[Script].

Compliant with the Mustache spec, including lambdas (jvm only)

Forked from clostache and updated to be compatible with ClojureScript.

Build Status Clojars Project

Usage

To render a template, just pass a template string and a map of data to render:

(require '[cljstache.core :refer [render]])

(render "Hello, {{name}}!" {:name "Felix"})

On the JVM, you can also render a resource from the classpath like this:

(require '[cljstache.core :refer [render-resource]])

(render-resource "templates/hello.mustache" {:name "Michael"})

Both of these functions support an optional third argument, containing partials (see below).

Examples

Variable replacement

Variables are tags enclosed by two curly brackets (mustaches) and will be replaced with the respective data.

Template:

Hello, {{person}}!

Data:

{:person "World"}

Output:

Hello, World!

Escaped output

The following characters will be replaced with HTML entities: &"<>. Tags that use three curly brackets or start with {{& will not be escaped.

Template:

Escaped: {{html}}
Unescaped: {{{html}}}
Unescaped: {{&html}}

Data:

{:html "<h1>Hello, World!</h1>"}

Output:

Escaped: &lt;h1&gt;Hello, World!&lt;/h1&gt;
Unescaped: <h1>Hello, World!</h1>
Unescaped: <h1>Hello, World!</h1>

Sections

Sections start with a tag beginning with {{# and end with one beginning with {{/. Their content is only rendered if the data is either the boolean value true, a value or a non-empty list.

Template:

{{#greet}}Hello, World!{{/greet}}

Data:

{:greet true}

Output:

Hello, World!

In case of a list, the section's content is rendered for each element, and it can contain tags refering to the elements.

Template:

<ul>
{{#people}}
    <li>{{name}}</li>
{{/people}}
</ul>

Data:

{:people [{:name "Felix"} {:name "Jenny"}]}

Output:

<ul>
    <li>Felix</li>
    <li>Jenny</li>
</ul>

For single values, the section is rendered exactly once.

Template:

{{#greeting}}{{text}}!{{/greeting}}

Data:

{:greeting {:text "Hello, World"}}

Output:

Hello, World!

Inverted sections

Inverted sections start with a tag beginning with {{^ and end with one beginning with {{/. Their content is only rendered if the data is either the boolean value false or an empty list.

Template:

{{^ignore}}Hello, World!{{/ignore}}

Data:

{:ignore false}

Output:

Hello, World!

Comments

Comments are tags that begin with {{!. They will not be rendered.

Template:

<h2>Felix' section<h2>
{{! Look ma, I've written a section }}

Output:

<h2>Felix' section</h2>

Dotted names

Dotted names are a shorter and more convenient way of accessing nested variables or sections.

Template:

{{greeting.text}}

Data:

{:greeting {:text "Hello, World"}}

Output:

Hello, World

Implicit iterators

Implicit iterators allow you to iterate over a one dimensional list of elements.

Template:

<ul>
{{#names}}
    <li>{{.}}</li>
{{/names}}
</ul>

Data:

{:names ["Felix" "Jenny"]}

Output:

<ul>
    <li>Felix</li>
    <li>Jenny</li>
</ul>

Partials

Partials allow you to include other templates (e.g. from separate files).

Template:

Hello{{>names}}!

Data:

{:people [{:name "Felix"} {:name "Jenny"}]}

Partials:

{:names "{{#people}}, {{name}}{{/people}}"}

Output:

Hello, Felix, Jenny!

Using Partials as Includes

You can use partials as "includes" to build up a document from other pieces. For example, when building a web page, you can have header and footer template files that are included in the main page template. This document describes one way to do that.

In your project directory (let's call it "my-proj"), create a "resources" directory if you don't already have one. Then,

cd path/to/my-proj/resources
mkdir templates
cd templates
touch header.mustache footer.mustache my-page.mustache

Make header.mustache look something like this:

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head><title>{{my-title}}</title></head>
<body>
<p>header here!</p>

and footer.mustache look something like:

<p>footer here!</p>
</body>
</html>

Edit my-page.mustache to contain:

{{> header}}

<h1>{{my-title}}</h1>

<p>Learn about {{stuff}} here.</p>

{{> footer}}

Now, in your source code (in a Compojure project, this might be my-proj/src/my_proj/handler.clj), in the ns macro's :require vector, add

[clostache.parser :refer [render-resource]]
[clojure.java.io :as io]

then create a render-page helper function:

(defn render-page
  "Pass in the template name (a string, sans its .mustache
filename extension), the data for the template (a map), and a list of
partials (keywords) corresponding to like-named template filenames."
  [template data partials]
  (render-resource
    (str "templates/" template ".mustache")
    data
    (reduce (fn [accum pt] ;; "pt" is the name (as a keyword) of the partial.
              (assoc accum pt (slurp (io/resource (str "templates/"
                                                       (name pt)
                                                       ".mustache")))))
            {}
            partials)))

(thanks to samflores for that idea ☺). You'd then call this function like so:

(render-page "my-page"
             {:my-title "My Title" :stuff "giraffes"}
             [:header :footer]))

Note that the value for :my-title which you pass in makes its way not only into the my-page.mustache template, but also down into the included header.mustache.

Set delimiters

You don't have to use mustaches, you can change the delimiters to anything you like.

Template:

{{=<% %>=}}
Hello, <%name%>!

Data:

{:name "Felix"}

Output:

Hello, Felix!

Lambdas

You can also call functions from templates.

Template:

{{hello}}
{{#greet}}Felix{{/greet}}

Data:

{:hello "Hello, World!"}
{:greet #(str "Hello, " %)}

Output:

Hello, World!
Hello, Felix!

Functions can also render the text given to them if they need to do something more complicated.

Template:

"{{#people}}Hi {{#upper}}{{name}}{{/upper}}{{/people}}"

Data:

{:people [{:name "Felix"}]
 :upper (fn [text]
          (fn [render-fn]
            (clojure.string/upper-case (render-fn text))))}

Output:

Hello FELIX

Development

Make sure you have Leiningen 2 installed.

To run the spec tests, fetch them like this:

git submodule update --init

And run them against all supported Clojure versions:

lein test-all

Requirements

As steadyhash uses Clojure's reader conditionals, steadyhash is dependent on both Clojure 1.7 and Leiningen 2.5.2 or later. Java 8 or greater is required to run the clojurescript tests (using Nashorn.)

License

Copyright (C) 2014 Felix H. Dahlke

This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2.1 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.

This library is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU Lesser General Public License for more details.

You should have received a copy of the GNU Lesser General Public License along with this library; see the file COPYING. If not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110-1301 USA

Contributors