Skip to content
Yet another SSML Builder, that uses the Razor Engine to render the SSML output
Branch: master
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
SSMLBuilder
SSMLBuilderTests
.gitignore
LICENSE
README.md
SSMLBuilder.sln
appveyor.yml

README.md

SSMLBuilder

Yet another SSML Builder, that uses the Razor Engine to render the SSML output

Build status master NuGet version

Why did I create this builder?

Personally, I don't like coding down stuff in an imperative manner, when it comes to reports or other similar UI'ish stuff. Microsoft offers the Razor engine to develop powerful web-frontends with a mix of HTML and C#. The best thing about razor is that it is not restricted to the use inside an ASP.NET application.

Since SSML is more or less XML with a fixed subset of tags, I figured, why not try to build my SSML Builder using the powerful Razor Engine

Special thanks to

I would like to thank @toddams and all those who took part in the development of the RazorLight implementation that I am basing this builder on. For more information, go and visit: https://github.com/toddams/RazorLight

How does it work?

Basically, you first have to build a .cshtml-View we know from ASP.NET application. That view will later be compiled into the SSML.

Here is a simple example:

@inherits RazorLight.TemplatePage<My.Namespace.Game>
<speak>
    <p>
        The clock is ticking down
        5<break time='0.3s' />
        4<break time='0.3s' />
        3<break time='0.3s' />
        2<break time='0.3s' />
        1<break time='0.8s' />

        @if (Model.PlayerAmount == 5 || Model.PlayerAmount == 6)
        {
            <p>
                We started with less than 7 people.
                <break time='5s' />
                3<break time='0.3s' />
                2<break time='0.3s' />
                1<break time='0.3s' />
            </p>
        }
        else
        {
            <p>
                We started with more than 6 people.
                <break time='5s'/>
                3<break time='0.3s'/>
                2<break time='0.3s'/>
                1<break time='0.3s'/>
            </p>
        }
        
        This is the end
    </p>
</speak>

When you finished, you can throw the view into the builder, append a model and finally let the razor engine do it's magic:

var templateKey = "SSMLBuilderTests.SSMLViews.TestView.cshtml";
var assembly = GetType().GetTypeInfo().Assembly;
var resource = assembly.GetManifestResourceStream(templateKey);
var ssmlResult = await SSMLRazorBuilder.BuildFromAsync(resource, templateKey, new Game { PlayerAmount = 5 });

The result in this example will look like this:

<speak>
    <p>
        The clock is ticking down
        5<break time='0.3s' />
        4<break time='0.3s' />
        3<break time='0.3s' />
        2<break time='0.3s' />
        1<break time='0.8s' />

            <p>
                We started with less than 7 people.
                <break time='5s' />
                3<break time='0.3s' />
                2<break time='0.3s' />
                1<break time='0.3s' />
            </p>
        
        This is the end
    </p>
</speak>

I used a dynamic model in this example. Feel free to use whatever type you like.

Verification

Be sure to always verify the SSML after the razor engine, since I cannot guarantee that your razor view is SSML-conform.

You can find my SSMLVerifier here.

You can’t perform that action at this time.