~josh aka my *NIX environment.
VimL Shell Ruby Perl
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bin.symlink
tmuxomatic.symlink
vim.symlink
zsh.symlink
.gitignore
.gitmodules
README.md
bootstrap
gitconfig.symlink
gitignore.symlink
htoprc.symlink
hypnotoad.cow.symlink
install.sh
screenrc.symlink
slate.js.symlink
tmux.conf.symlink
ttytterrc.symlink
vimrc.symlink
zshrc.symlink

README.md

~josh

These are my dotfiles. There are many like them, but these are mine.

intro

Dotfiles are used to personalize a *NIX system. I use these dotfiles on Linux and Mac OS X systems.

I use the excellent zsh for my shell, but most of the aliases, shell functions, etc in .zshrc and elsewhere should work just fine in bash.

There are comments throughout my dotfiles attributing all known original sources.

install

fancypants single-line install

$ bash <(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/joshdick/dotfiles/master/bootstrap)

plainpants several-line install

$ git clone git://github.com/joshdick/dotfiles.git ~/.dotfiles
$ cd ~/.dotfiles
$ ./install.sh

The install script looks for all files and directories in the root of the repository ending in the .symlink extension. It then symlinks those files and directories into your home directory with a dot prepended and the .symlink extension removed.

Your existing dotfiles will be safe since the script will not symlink over any existing files or symlinks with the same name; you will see a warning that the file has been skipped. Seeing any of these warnings means that only some of the dotfiles will have been symlinked in, so [re]move the conflicting files and re-run the script to ensure that all dotfiles are symlinked in correctly.

I take no responsibility for any havoc the install script may wreak on your system...it works for me!

usage

~/.localrc will be sourced if it exists. Anything that should be kept secret/doesn't need to be version controlled should go in this file. It is useful for machine-specific configuration.

~/.bin contains git submodules for various utilities I use. These are added to PATH as appropriate via the ~/.bin/bin_init.zsh script. ~/.bin itself is also added to PATH.