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NoSQL Unit is a JUnit extension that helps you write NoSQL unit tests.

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NoSQLUnit Core

Overview

Unit testing is a method by which the smallest testable part of an application is validated. Unit tests must follow the FIRST Rules; these are Fast, Isolated, Repeatable, Self-Validated and Timely.

It is strange to think about a JEE application without persistence layer (typical Relational databases or new NoSQL databases) so should be interesting to write unit tests of persistence layer too. When we are writing unit tests of persistence layer we should focus on to not break two main concepts of FIRST rules, the fast and the isolated ones.

Our tests will be fast if they don't access network nor filesystem, and in case of persistence systems network and filesystem are the most used resources. In case of RDBMS ( SQL ), many Java in-memory databases exist like Apache Derby , H2 or HSQLDB . These databases, as their name suggests are embedded into your program and data are stored in memory, so your tests are still fast. The problem is with NoSQL systems, because of their heterogeneity. Some systems work using Document approach (like MongoDb ), other ones Column (like Hbase ), or Graph (like Neo4J ). For this reason the in-memory mode should be provided by the vendor, there is no a generic solution.

Our tests must be isolated from themselves. It is not acceptable that one test method modifies the result of another test method. In case of persistence tests this scenario occurs when previous test method insert an entry to database and next test method execution finds the change. So before execution of each test, database should be found in a known state. Note that if your test found database in a known state, test will be repeatable, if test assertion depends on previous test execution, each execution will be unique. For homogeneous systems like RDBMS , DBUnit exists to maintain database in a known state before each execution. But there is no like DBUnit framework for heterogeneous NoSQL systems.

NoSQLUnit resolves this problem by providing a JUnit extension which helps us to manage lifecycle of NoSQL systems and also take care of maintaining databases into known state.

Requirements

To run NoSQLUnit , JUnit 4.10 or later must be provided. This is because of NoSQLUnit is using Rules , and they have changed from previous versions to 4.10.

Although it should work with JDK 5 , jars are compiled using JDK 6 .

NoSQLUnit

NoSQLUnit is a JUnit extension to make writing unit and integration tests of systems that use NoSQL backend easier and is composed by two sets of Rules and a group of annotations.

First set of Rules are those responsible of managing database lifecycle; there are two for each supported backend.

  • The first one (in case it is possible) it is the in-memory mode. This mode takes care of starting and stopping database system in " in-memory " mode. This mode will be typically used during unit testing execution.

  • The second one is the managed mode. This mode is in charge of starting NoSQL server but as remote process (in local machine) and stopping it. This will typically used during integration testing execution.

You can add them in Test Suites and/or Tests Classes, NoSQLUnit takes care of only starting database once.

Second set of Rules are those responsible of maintaining database into known state. Each supported backend will have its own, and can be understood as a connection to defined database which will be used to execute the required operations for maintaining the stability of the system.

Note that because NoSQL databases are heterogeneous, each system will require its own implementation.

And finally two annotations are provided, @UsingDataSet and @ShouldMatchDataSet , (thank you so much Arquillian people for the name).

Seeding Database

@UsingDataSet is used to seed database with defined data set. In brief data sets are files that contain all data to be inserted to configured database. In order to seed your database, use @UsingDataSet annotation, you can define it either on the test itself or on the class level. If there is definition on both, test level annotation takes precedence. This annotation has two attributes locations and loadStrategy .

With locations attribute you can specify classpath datasets location. Locations are relative to test class location. Note that more than one dataset can be specified.

Also withSelectiveLocations attribute can be used to specify datasets location. See Advanced Usage chapter for more information.

If files are not specified explicitly, next strategy is applied:

  • First searches for a file on classpath in same package of test class with next file name, [test class name]#[test method name].[format] (only if annotation is present at test method).

  • If first rule is not met or annotation is defined at class scope, next file is searched on classpath in same package of test class, [test class name].[default format] .

Warning

datasets must reside into classpath and format depends on NoSQL vendor.

Second attribute provides strategies for inserting data. Implemented strategies are:


INSERT Insert defined datasets before executing any test method. DELETE_ALL Deletes all elements of database before executing any test method. CLEAN_INSERT This is the most used strategy. It deletes all elements of database and then insert defined datasets before executing any test method.


: Load Strategies

An example of usage:

@UsingDataSet(locations="my_data_set.json", loadStrategy=LoadStrategyEnum.INSERT)

Verifying Database

Sometimes it might imply a huge amount of work asserting database state directly from testing code. By using @ShouldMatchDataSet on test method, NoSQLUnit will check if database contains expected entries after test execution. As with @ShouldMatchDataSet annotation you can define classpath file location, or using withSelectiveMatche, see Advanced Usage chapter for more information. If it is not dataset supplied next convention is used:

  • First searches for a file on classpath in same package of test class with next file name, [test class name]#[test method name]-expected.[format] (only if annotation is present at test method).

  • If first rule is not met or annotation is defined at class scope, file is searched on classpath in same package of test class, [test class name]-expected.[default format] .

Warning

datasets must reside into classpath and format depends on NoSQL vendor.

An example of usage:

@ShouldMatchDataSet(location="my_expected_data_set.json")

MongoDB Engine

MongoDB

MongoDB is a NoSQL database that stores structured data as JSON-like documents with dynamic schemas.

NoSQLUnit supports MongoDB by using next classes:


In Memory com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.mongodb.InMemoryMongoDb Managed com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.mongodb.ManagedMongoDb


: Lifecycle Management Rules


NoSQLUnit Management com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.mongodb.MongoDbRule


: Manager Rule

Maven Setup

To use NoSQLUnit with MongoDb you only need to add next dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.lordofthejars</groupId>
    <artifactId>nosqlunit-mongodb</artifactId>
    <version>${version.nosqlunit}</version>
</dependency>

Note that if you are plannig to use in-memory approach it is implemented using Fongo . Fongo is a new project that help with unit testing Java-based MongoDb Applications. Fongo

Dataset Format

Default dataset file format in MongoDB module is json .

Datasets must have next format :

{
    "name_collection1": [
    {
        "attribute_1":"value1",
        "attribute_2":"value2"
    },
    {
        "attribute_3":2,
        "attribute_4":"value4"
    }
    ],
    "name_collection2": [
        ...
    ],
    ....
}

Notice that if attributes value are integers, double quotes are not required.

If you want to use ISODate function or any other javascript function you should see how MongoDB Java Driver deals with it. For example in case of ISODate:

"bornAt":{ "$date" : "2011-01-05T10:09:15.210Z"}

With last versions of MongoDB, index support is also implemented allowing developers to define indexes through defined document properties. For more information visit MongoDB. In this case dataset has been changed to let us define indexes too.

{
   "collection1":{
      "indexes":[
         {
            "index":{
               "code":1
            }
         }
      ],
      "data":[
         {
            "id":1,
            "code":"JSON dataset"
         },
         {
            "id":2,
            "code":"Another row"
         }
      ]
   }
}

Note that we define the collection name, and then we define two subdocuments. The first one is where we define an array of indexes, all of them related to defined collection and we define which fields are going to be indexed (same as document as defined in MongoDB index specification). And then data property, where we define all documents that goes into collection under test.

Getting Started

Lifecycle Management Strategy

First step is defining which lifecycle management strategy is required for your tests. Depending on kind of test you are implementing (unit test, integration test, deployment test, ...) you will require an in-memory approach, managed approach or remote approach.

To configure in-memory approach you should only instantiate next rule :

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.mongodb.InMemoryMongoDb.InMemoryMongoRuleBuilder.newInMemoryMongoDbRule;

@ClassRule
public static InMemoryMongoDb inMemoryMongoDb = newInMemoryMongoDbRule().build();

To configure the managed way, you should use ManagedMongoDb rule and may require some configuration parameters.

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.mongodb.ManagedMongoDb.MongoServerRuleBuilder.newManagedMongoDbRule;

@ClassRule
public static ManagedMongoDb managedMongoDb = newManagedMongoDbRule().build();

By default managed MongoDB rule uses next default values:

  • MongoDB installation directory is retrieved from MONGO_HOME system environment variable.

  • Target path, that is the directory where MongoDb server is started, is target/mongo-temp .

  • Database path is at {target path} /mongo-dbpath .

  • Because after execution of tests all generated data is removed, in {target path} /logpath will remain log file generated by the server.

  • In Windows systems executable should be found as bin/mongod.exe meanwhile in MAC OS and *nix should be found as bin/mongod .

  • No journaling.

ManagedMongoDb can be created from scratch, but for making life easier, a DSL is provided using MongoServerRuleBuilder class. For example :

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.mongodb.ManagedMongoDb.MongoServerRuleBuilder.newManagedMongoDbRule;

@ClassRule
public static ManagedMongoDb managedMongoDb =
newManagedMongoDbRule().mongodPath("/opt/mongo").appendSingleCommandLineArguments("-vvv").build();

In example we are overriding MONGO_HOME variable (in case has been set) and set mongo home at /opt/mongo . Moreover we are appending a single argument to MongoDB executable, in this case setting log level to number 3 (-vvv). Also you can append property=value arguments using appendCommandLineArguments(String argumentName, String argumentValue) method.

Warning

when you are specifying command line arguments, remember to add slash (-) and double slash (--) where is necessary.

To stop MongoDB instance, NoSQLUnit sends a shutdown command to server using Java Mongo API.

Configuring remote approach does not require any special rule because you (or System like Maven ) is the responsible of starting and stopping the server. This mode is used in deployment tests where you are testing your application on real environment.

Configuring MongoDB Connection

Next step is configuring MongoDB rule in charge of maintaining MongoDB database into known state by inserting and deleting defined datasets. You must register MongoDbRule JUnit rule class, which requires a configuration parameter with information like host, port or database name.

To make developer's life easier and code more readable, a fluent interface can be used to create these configuration objects. Two different kind of configuration builders exist.

The first one is for configuring a connection to in-memory Fongo server. For almost all cases default parameters are enough.

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.mongodb.InMemoryMongoDbConfigurationBuilder.inMemoryMongoDb;

@Rule
public MongoDbRule embeddedMongoDbRule = newMongoDbRule().defaultEmbeddedMongoDb("test");

The second one is for configuring a connection to managed/remote MongoDB server. Default values are:


Host localhost Port 27017 Authentication No authentication parameters.


: Default Managed Configuration Values

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.mongodb.MongoDbConfigurationBuilder.mongoDb;

@Rule
public MongoDbRule remoteMongoDbRule = new MongoDbRule(mongoDb().databaseName("test").build());
import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.mongodb.MongoDbConfigurationBuilder.mongoDb;

@Rule
public MongoDbRule remoteMongoDbRule = new MongoDbRule(mongoDb().databaseName("test").host("my_remote_host").build());

But also we can define it to use Spring Data MongoDB defined instance.

If you are plannig to use Spring Data MongoDB, you may require to use the Mongo instance defined within Spring Application Context, mostly because you are defining an embedded connection using Fongo:

<bean name="fongo" class="com.github.fakemongo.Fongo">
    <constructor-arg value="InMemoryMongo" />
</bean>
<bean id="mongo" factory-bean="fongo" factory-method="getMongo" />

In these cases you should use an special method which gets Mongo Fongo instance, instead of creating new one.

@Autowired
private ApplicationContext applicationContext;

@Rule
public MongoDbRule mongoDbRule = newMongoDbRule().defaultSpringMongoDb("test");

Note that you need to autowire the application context, so NoSQLUnit can inject instance defined within application context into MongoDbRule.

Complete Example

Consider a library application, which apart from multiple operations, it allow us to add new books to system. Our model is as simple as:

public class Book {

    private String title;

    private int numberOfPages;

    public Book(String title, int numberOfPages) {
        super();
        this.title = title;
        this.numberOfPages = numberOfPages;
    }

    public void setTitle(String title) {
        this.title = title;
    }

    public void setNumberOfPages(int numberOfPages) {
        this.numberOfPages = numberOfPages;
    }


    public String getTitle() {
        return title;
    }

    public int getNumberOfPages() {
        return numberOfPages;
    }
}

Next business class is the responsible of managing access to MongoDb server:

public class BookManager {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(BookManager.class);

    private static final MongoDbBookConverter MONGO_DB_BOOK_CONVERTER = new MongoDbBookConverter();
    private static final DbObjectBookConverter DB_OBJECT_BOOK_CONVERTER = new DbObjectBookConverter();


    private DBCollection booksCollection;

    public BookManager(DBCollection booksCollection) {
        this.booksCollection = booksCollection;
    }

    public void create(Book book) {
        DBObject dbObject = MONGO_DB_BOOK_CONVERTER.convert(book);
        booksCollection.insert(dbObject);
    }
}

And now it is time for testing. In next test we are going to validate that a book is inserted correctly into database.

package com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.demo.mongodb;

public class WhenANewBookIsCreated {

    @ClassRule
    public static ManagedMongoDb managedMongoDb = newManagedMongoDbRule().mongodPath("/opt/mongo").build();

    @Rule
    public MongoDbRule remoteMongoDbRule = new MongoDbRule(mongoDb().databaseName("test").build());

    @Test
    @UsingDataSet(locations="initialData.json", loadStrategy=LoadStrategyEnum.CLEAN_INSERT)
    @ShouldMatchDataSet(location="expectedData.json")
    public void book_should_be_inserted_into_repository() {

        BookManager bookManager = new BookManager(MongoDbUtil.getCollection(Book.class.getSimpleName()));

        Book book = new Book("The Lord Of The Rings", 1299);
        bookManager.create(book);
    }

}

In previous test we have defined that MongoDB will be managed by test by starting an instance of server located at /opt/mongo . Moreover we are setting an initial dataset in file initialData.json located at classpath com/lordofthejars/nosqlunit/demo/mongodb/initialData.json and expected dataset called expectedData.json .

{
    "Book":
    [
        {"title":"The Hobbit","numberOfPages":293}
    ]
}
{
    "Book":
    [
        {"title":"The Hobbit","numberOfPages":293},
        {"title":"The Lord Of The Rings","numberOfPages":1299}
    ]
}

You can watch full example at github .

Replica Set

Introduction

Database replication in MongoDB adds redundancy and high availability of the data. In case of MongoDB instead of having traditional master-slave pattern architecture, it implements Replica Set architecture, which can be understood as more sophisticated master-slave replication. For more information about Replica Set read mongoDB

Set up and Start Replica Set architecture

In NoSQLUnit we can define a replica set architecture and starting it up, so our tests are executed against a replica set servers instead of a single server. Due the nature of replica set system, we can only create a replica set of managed servers.

So let's see how to define an architecture and starting all related servers. The main class is ReplicaSetManagedMongoDb which manages lifecycle of all servers involved in replica set. To build a ReplicaSetManagedMongoDb class, ReplicaSetBuilder builder class is provided and it will allow us to define the replica set architecture. Using it we can set the eligible servers (those that can be primary or secondary), the only secondary servers, the arbiters, the hidden ones, and configure all of them with the attributes like priority, voters, or setting tags.

So let's see an example where we are defining two eligible servers and one arbiter in a replica set called rs-test.

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.mongodb.replicaset.ReplicaSetBuilder.replicaSet;

@ClassRule
public static ReplicaSetManagedMongoDb replicaSetManagedMongoDb = replicaSet(
            "rs-test")
            .eligible(
                    newManagedMongoDbLifecycle().port(27017)
                            .dbRelativePath("rs-0").logRelativePath("log-0")
                            .get())
            .eligible(
                    newManagedMongoDbLifecycle().port(27018)
                            .dbRelativePath("rs-1").logRelativePath("log-1")
                            .get())
            .arbiter(
                    newManagedMongoDbLifecycle().port(27019)
                            .dbRelativePath("rs-2").logRelativePath("log-2")
                            .get())
            .get();

Notice that you must define different port for each server and also a different database path. Also note that ReplicaSetManagedMongoDb won't let start executing tests until all replica set becomes stable (this can take some minutes).

Then we only have to create a MongoDbRule as usually which will populate defined data into replica set servers. For this case a new configuration builder is provided that allows us to define the mongo servers location and the write concern used during seeding phase. By default Aknownledge write concern is used.

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.mongodb.ReplicationMongoDbConfigurationBuilder.replicationMongoDbConfiguration;

@Rule
public MongoDbRule mongoDbRule = newMongoDbRule().configure(
                        replicationMongoDbConfiguration().databaseName("test")
                            .seed("localhost", 27017)
                            .seed("localhost", 27018)
                            .configure())
                        .build();

Now we have configured and deployed a replica set and populated them with the dataset.

But NoSQLUnit also provides an utility method to cause server failures. It is as easy as calling shutdownServer method.

replicaSetManagedMongoDb.shutdownServer(27017);

Keep in mind two aspects of using this method:

  • Because @ClassRule is used, we are responsible for restarting the system by calling startServer.
  • System may become unstable and Mongo driver can throw many exceptions (that's normal because of MonitorThread) and even do some test fails. If you want to wait until all servers become stable again (in real life you won't have this possibility), you can use next call:
replicaSetManagedMongoDb.waitUntilReplicaSetBecomesStable();

Also you can use NoSQLUnit to test your replica set deployment of remote servers. You can use MongoDbCommands to retrieve replica set configuration.

DBObject replicaSetGetStatus = MongoDbCommands.replicaSetGetStatus(mongoClient);

And in previous case replicaSetGetStatus contains a json document with the format described in MongoDB.

You can watch full example in github.

Sharding

Introduction

Sharding is another way of replication, but in this case we are scaling horizontally. MongoDB partitions a collection and stores the different portions on different machines. From a logical overview client only see one single database, but internally a cluster of machines are being used with data spread across all system.

To run sharding we must set up a sharded cluster. A sharded cluster is composed by next elements:

  • shards which are mongod instances that holds a portion of the database collections.
  • config servers which stores metadata about the clusters.
  • mongos servers determine the location of required data from shards.

Apart from setting up a sharding architecture, we also have to register each shard, enable sharding for database, enable sharding for each collection we want to partition, and defining which element of the document is used to calculate the shard key.

For more information about Sharding read mongoDB

Set up and Start Sharding

In NoSQLUnit we can define a sharding architecture and starting it up, so our tests are executed against it instead of a single server. Due the nature of sharding system, we can only create sharding for managed servers.

So let's see how to define an architecture and starting all related servers. The main class is ShardedManagedMongoDb which manages lifecycle of all servers involved in sharding (shards, configs and mongos). To build a ShardedManagedMongoDb class, ShardedGroupBuilder builder class is provided and it will allow us to define each server involved in sharding.

Let's see an example on how to set up and start a system with two shards, one config server and one mongos.

@ClassRule
public static ShardedManagedMongoDb shardedManagedMongoDb = shardedGroup()
                                .shard(newManagedMongoDbLifecycle().port(27018).dbRelativePath("rs-1").logRelativePath("log-1").get())
                                .shard(newManagedMongoDbLifecycle().port(27019).dbRelativePath("rs-2").logRelativePath("log-2").get())
                                .config(newManagedMongoDbLifecycle().port(27020).dbRelativePath("rs-3").logRelativePath("log-3").get())
                                .mongos(newManagedMongosLifecycle().configServer(27020).get())
                            .get();

Notice that you must define different port for each server and also a different database path. Also note that in case of mongos you must set the config server port, and is not necessary to set up the database path.

And finally we only have to create a MongoDbRule as usually which will populate defined data into sharding servers. For this case we must use the same builder used for replica set but enabling sharding. Keep in mind that in this case we only have to register the mongos instances, not shards or config servers.

@Rule
public MongoDbRule mongoDbRule = newMongoDbRule().configure(
                                replicationMongoDbConfiguration().databaseName("test")
                                                 .enableSharding()
                                                 .seed("localhost", 27017)
                                                 .configure())
                                            .build(); 

And finally the dataset format is changed from the standard one to allow us define which attributes are used as shards. Let's see an example:

{
    "collection_name": {
                "shard-key-pattern": ["attribute_1", "attribute_2"],
                "data": 
                        [
                            {"attribute_1":"value_1","attribute_2":value_2, "attribute_3":"value_3"}
                        ]
            }
}

For each collection you define which attributes are used for calculating the shard key by using shard-key-pattern attribute, and finally using data attribute we set the whole document which will be inserted into collection.

In case we use this dataset as expected dataset, shard-key-pattern is ignored, and only data document is used for comparison.

Replicated Sharded Cluster

Introduction

The third way of replication is an hybrid. Each shard contains a replica set with n-member replica set. And as sharding at least one config server and one mongos server is required.

For more information about Replicated Sharded Cluster read mongoDB

Set up and Start Sharding

In NoSQLUnit we can define a replicated sharded cluster architecture and starting it up, so our tests are executed against it instead of a single server. Due the nature of replicated sharded cluster, we can only create sharding for managed servers.

So let's see how to define an architecture and starting all related servers. The main class is ShardedManagedMongoDb which manages lifecycle of all servers involved in sharding (shards, configs and mongos). To build a ShardedManagedMongoDb class, ShardedGroupBuilder builder class is provided and it will allow us to define each server involved in sharding, but in contrast of sharding, we need to add a replica set instead of a shard. For this reason ReplicaSetManagedMongoDb is also used.

Let's see an example on how to set up two replicated sharded cluster, with one member each replica set, (of course in production environment you would have more), one config server and one mongos.

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.mongodb.shard.ShardedGroupBuilder.shardedGroup;
import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.mongodb.replicaset.ReplicaSetBuilder.replicaSet;

@ClassRule
public static ShardedManagedMongoDb shardedManagedMongoDb = shardedGroup()
                                    .replicaSet(replicaSet("rs-test-1")
                                            .eligible(
                                                   newManagedMongoDbLifecycle()
                                                    .port(27007).dbRelativePath("rs-0").logRelativePath("log-0")
                                                    .get()
                                                 )
                                           .get())
                                    .replicaSet(replicaSet("rs-test-2")
                                            .eligible(
                                                newManagedMongoDbLifecycle()
                                                    .port(27009).dbRelativePath("rs-0").logRelativePath("log-0")
                                                    .get()
                                                 )
                                           .get())
                                    .config(newManagedMongoDbLifecycle().port(27020).dbRelativePath("rs-3").logRelativePath("log-3").get())
                                    .mongos(newManagedMongosLifecycle().configServer(27020).get())
                                .get();

Note that we are using the replicaSet method of shardedGroup to create a replica set inside a sharded, and then we use methods defined into ReplicaSetBuilder to configure the replica set.

And finally we only have to create a MongoDbRule as usually which will populate defined data into servers. For replicated sharded clusters we can use the same class and dataset as sharding.

@Rule
public MongoDbRule mongoDbRule = newMongoDbRule().configure(
                                replicationMongoDbConfiguration().databaseName("test")
                                                 .enableSharding()
                                                 .seed("localhost", 27017)
                                                 .configure())
                                            .build(); 

and

{
    "collection_name": {
                "shard-key-pattern": ["attribute_1", "attribute_2"],
                "data": 
                        [
                            {"attribute_1":"value_1","attribute_2":value_2, "attribute_3":"value_3"}
                        ]
            }
}

Neo4j Engine

Neo4j

Neo4j is a high-performance, NoSQL graph database with all the features of a mature and robust database.

NoSQLUnit supports Neo4j by using next classes:


In Memory com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.InMemoryNeo4j Embedded com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.EmbeddedNeo4j Managed Wrapping com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.ManagedWrappingNeoServer Managed com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.ManagedNeoServer


: Lifecycle Management Rules


NoSQLUnit Management com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.Neo4jRule


: Manager Rule

Maven Setup

To use NoSQLUnit with Neo4j you only need to add next dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.lordofthejars</groupId>
    <artifactId>nosqlunit-neo4j</artifactId>
    <version>${version.nosqlunit}</version>
</dependency>

Dataset Format

Default dataset file format in Neo4j module is GraphML . GraphML is a comprehensive and easy-to-use file format for graphs.

Datasets must have next format :

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<graphml xmlns="http://graphml.graphdrawing.org/xmlns">
    <key id="attr1" for="edge" attr.name="attr1" attr.type="float" attr.autoindexName="indexName"/>
    <key id="attr2" for="node" attr.name="attr2" attr.type="string"/>
    <graph id="G" edgedefault="directed">
        <node id="1">
            <data key="attr2">value1</data>
            <index name="mynodeindex" key="mykey">myvalue</index>
        </node>
        <node id="2">
            <data key="attr2">value2</data>
        </node>
        <edge id="7" source="1" target="2" label="label1">
            <data key="attr1">float</data>
            <index name="myrelindex" key="mykey">myvalue</index>
        </edge>
    </graph>
</graphml>

where:

  • graphml : the root element of the GraphML document

  • key : description for graph element properties, you must define if property type is for nodes or relationships, name, and type of element. In our case string, int, long, float, double and boolean are supported.

  • graph : the beginning of the graph representation. In our case only one level of graphs are supported. Inner graphs will be ignored.

  • node : the beginning of a vertex representation. Please note that id 0 is reserved for reference node, so cannot be used as id.

  • edge : the beginning of an edge representation. Source and target attributes are filled with node id. If you want to link with reference node, use a 0 which is the id of root node. Note that label attribute is not in defined in standard definition of GraphML specification; GraphML supports adding new attributes to all GrpahML elements, and label attribute has been added to facilitate the creation of edge labels.

  • data : the key/value data associated with a graph element. Data value will be validated against type defined in key element.

  • attr.autoindexName : this attribute is optional and can only set in key element. It creates an index with given name for properties of that type for all nodes or edges.

  • index : This tag is optional and creates an index with given name, key and value in the node or edge where it is declared.

Getting Started

Lifecycle Management Strategy

First step is defining which lifecycle management strategy is required for your tests. Depending on kind of test you are implementing (unit test, integration test, deployment test, ...) you will require an in-memory approach, embedded approach, managed approach or remote approach.

In-memory Lifecycle

To configure in-memory approach you should only instantiate next rule :

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.InMemoryNeo4j.InMemoryNeo4jRuleBuilder.newInMemoryNeo4j;

@ClassRule
public static InMemoryNeo4j inMemoryNeo4j = newInMemoryNeo4j().build();

Embedded Lifecycle

To configure embedded approach you should only instantiate next rule :

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.EmbeddedNeo4j.EmbeddedNeo4jRuleBuilder.newEmbeddedNeo4jRule;

@ClassRule
public static EmbeddedNeo4j embeddedNeo4j = newEmbeddedNeo4jRule().build();

By default embedded Neo4j rule uses next default values:


Target path This is the directory where Neo4j server is started and is target/neo4j-temp .


: Default Embedded Values

Managed Lifecycle

To configure managed way, two possible approaches can be used:

The first one is using an embedded database wrapped by a server . This is a way to give an embedded database visibility through network (internally we are creating a WrappingNeoServerBootstrapper instance) :

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.ManagedWrappingNeoServer.ManagedWrappingNeoServerRuleBuilder.newWrappingNeoServerNeo4jRule;

@ClassRule
public static ManagedWrappingNeoServer managedWrappingNeoServer = newWrappingNeoServerNeo4jRule().port(8888).build();

By default wrapped managed Neo4j rule uses next default values, but can be configured programmatically as shown in previous example :


Target path The directory where Neo4j server is started and is target/neo4j-temp . Port Where server is listening incoming messages is 7474.


: Default Wrapped Values

The second strategy is starting and stopping an already installed server on executing machine, by calling start and stop command lines. Next rule should be registered:

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.ManagedNeoServer.Neo4jServerRuleBuilder.newManagedNeo4jServerRule;

@ClassRule
public static ManagedNeoServer managedNeoServer = newManagedNeo4jServerRule().neo4jPath("/opt/neo4j").build();

By default managed Neo4j rule uses next default values, but can be configured programmatically as shown in previous example :


Target path This is the directory where Neo4j process will be started and by default is target/neo4j-temp . Port Where server is listening incoming messages is 7474. Neo4jPath Neo4j installation directory which by default is retrieved from NEO4J_HOME system environment variable.


: Default Managed Values

Warning

Versions prior to Neo4j 1.8, port cannot be configured from command line, and port should be changed manually in conf/neo4j-server.properties . Although this restriction, if you have configured Neo4j to run through a different port, it should be specified too in ManagedNeoServer rule.

Remote Lifecycle

Configuring remote approach does not require any special rule because you (or System like Maven ) is the responsible of starting and stopping the server. This mode is used in deployment tests where you are testing your application on real environment.

Configuring Neo4j Connection

Next step is configuring Neo4j rule in charge of maintaining Neo4j graph into known state by inserting and deleting defined datasets. You must register Neo4jRule JUnit rule class, which requires a configuration parameter with information like host, port, uri or target directory.

To make developer's life easier and code more readable, a fluent interface can be used to create these configuration objects. Two different kind of configuration builders exist.

In-Memory/Embedded Connection

The first one is for configuring a connection to in-memory/embedded Neo4j .

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.EmbeddedNeoServerConfigurationBuilder.newEmbeddedNeoServerConfiguration;

@Rule
public Neo4jRule neo4jRule = new Neo4jRule(newEmbeddedNeoServerConfiguration().build());

If you are only registering one embedded Neo4j instance like previous example , calling build is enough. If you are using more than one Neo4j embedded connection like explained in Simultaneous Engine section, targetPath shall be provided by using buildFromTargetPath method.

If you are using in-memory approach mixed with embedded approach, target path for in-memory instance can be found at InMemoryNeo4j.INMEMORY_NEO4J_TARGET_PATH variable.

Managed/Remote Connection

The second one is for configuring a connection to remote Neo4j server (it is irrelevant at this level if it is wrapped or not). Default values are:


Connection URI http://localhost:7474/db/data Authentication No authentication parameters.


: Default Managed Connection Values

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.ManagedNeoServerConfigurationBuilder.newManagedNeoServerConfiguration;

@Rule
public Neo4jRule neo4jRule = new Neo4jRule(newManagedNeoServerConfiguration().build());

or you can use the fast way:

@Rule
public Neo4jRule neo4jRule = newNeo4jRule().defaultManagedNeo4j();

Spring Connection

If you are plannig to use Spring Data Neo4j, you may require to use the GraphDatabaseService defined within Spring Application Context, mostly because you are defining an embedded connection using Spring namespace:

<neo4j:config storeDirectory="target/config-test"/>

In these cases you should use an special method which gets GraphDatabaseService instance instead of creating new one.

@Autowired
private ApplicationContext applicationContext;

@Rule
public Neo4jRule neo4jRule = newNeo4jRule().defaultSpringGraphDatabaseServiceNeo4j();

Note that you need to autowire the application context, so NoSQLUnit can inject instance defined within application context into Neo4jRule.

Verifying Graph

@ShouldMatchDataSet is also supported for Neo4j graphs but we should keep in mind some considerations.

To compare two graphs, stored graph is exported into GraphML format and then is compared with expected GraphML using XmlUnit framework. This approach implies two aspects to be considered, the first one is that although your graph does not contains any connection to reference node, reference node will appear too with the form ( <node id="0"></node> ). The other aspect is that id's are Neo4j's internal id, so when you write the expected file, remember to follow the same id strategy followed by Neo4j so id attribute of each node could be matched correctly with generated output. Inserted nodes' id starts from 1 (0 is reserved for reference node), meanwhile edges starts from 0.

This way to compare graphs may change in future (although this strategy will be always supported).

As I have noted in verification section I find that using @ShouldMatchDataSet is a bad approach during testing because test readibility is affected negatively. So as general guide, my advice is to try to avoid using @ShouldMatchDataSet in your tests as much as possible.

Full Example

To show how to use NoSQLUnit with Neo4j , we are going to create a very simple application that counts Neo's friends.

MatrixManager is the business class responsible of inserting new friends and counting the number of Neo's friends.

public class MatrixManager {

    public enum RelTypes implements RelationshipType {
        NEO_NODE, KNOWS, CODED_BY
    }

    private GraphDatabaseService graphDb;

    public MatrixManager(GraphDatabaseService graphDatabaseService) {
        this.graphDb = graphDatabaseService;
    }

    public int countNeoFriends() {

        Node neoNode = getNeoNode();
        Traverser friendsTraverser = getFriends(neoNode);

        return friendsTraverser.getAllNodes().size();

    }

    public void addNeoFriend(String name, int age) {
        Transaction tx = this.graphDb.beginTx();
        try {
            Node friend = this.graphDb.createNode();
            friend.setProperty("name", name);
            Relationship relationship = getNeoNode().createRelationshipTo(friend, RelTypes.KNOWS);
            relationship.setProperty("age", age);
            tx.success();
        } finally {
            tx.finish();
        }
    }

    private static Traverser getFriends(final Node person) {
        return person.traverse(Order.BREADTH_FIRST, StopEvaluator.END_OF_GRAPH, ReturnableEvaluator.ALL_BUT_START_NODE,
                RelTypes.KNOWS, Direction.OUTGOING);
    }

    private Node getNeoNode() {
        return graphDb.getReferenceNode().getSingleRelationship(RelTypes.NEO_NODE, Direction.OUTGOING).getEndNode();
    }

}

And now one unit test and one integration test is written:

For unit test we are going to use embedded approach:

import static org.junit.Assert.assertThat;
import static org.hamcrest.CoreMatchers.is;
import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.EmbeddedNeo4j.EmbeddedNeo4jRuleBuilder.newEmbeddedNeo4jRule;
import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.EmbeddedNeoServerConfigurationBuilder.newEmbeddedNeoServerConfiguration;

import javax.inject.Inject;

import org.junit.ClassRule;
import org.junit.Rule;
import org.junit.Test;
import org.neo4j.graphdb.GraphDatabaseService;

import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.annotation.UsingDataSet;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.core.LoadStrategyEnum;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.EmbeddedNeo4j;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.Neo4jRule;

public class WhenNeoFriendsAreRequired {

    @ClassRule
    public static EmbeddedNeo4j embeddedNeo4j = newEmbeddedNeo4jRule().build();

    @Rule
    public Neo4jRule neo4jRule = new Neo4jRule(newEmbeddedNeoServerConfiguration().build(), this);

    @Inject
    private GraphDatabaseService graphDatabaseService;

    @Test
    @UsingDataSet(locations="matrix.xml", loadStrategy=LoadStrategyEnum.CLEAN_INSERT)
    public void all_direct_and_inderectly_friends_should_be_counted() {
        MatrixManager matrixManager = new MatrixManager(graphDatabaseService);
        int countNeoFriends = matrixManager.countNeoFriends();
        assertThat(countNeoFriends, is(3));
    }

}

And as integration test , the managed one:

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.ManagedWrappingNeoServer.ManagedWrappingNeoServerRuleBuilder.newWrappingNeoServerNeo4jRule;
import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.ManagedNeoServerConfigurationBuilder.newManagedNeoServerConfiguration;

import javax.inject.Inject;

import org.junit.ClassRule;
import org.junit.Rule;
import org.junit.Test;
import org.neo4j.graphdb.GraphDatabaseService;

import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.annotation.ShouldMatchDataSet;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.annotation.UsingDataSet;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.core.LoadStrategyEnum;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.ManagedWrappingNeoServer;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.Neo4jRule;

public class WhenNeoMeetsANewFriend {

    @ClassRule
    public static ManagedWrappingNeoServer managedWrappingNeoServer = newWrappingNeoServerNeo4jRule().build();

    @Rule
    public Neo4jRule neo4jRule = new Neo4jRule(newManagedNeoServerConfiguration().build(), this);

    @Inject
    private GraphDatabaseService graphDatabaseService;

    @Test
    @UsingDataSet(locations="matrix.xml", loadStrategy=LoadStrategyEnum.CLEAN_INSERT)
    @ShouldMatchDataSet(location="expected-matrix.xml")
    public void friend_should_be_related_into_neo_graph() {

        MatrixManager matrixManager = new MatrixManager(graphDatabaseService);
        matrixManager.addNeoFriend("The Oracle", 4);
    }

}

Note that in both cases we are using the same dataset as initial state, which looks like:

<graphml xmlns="http://graphml.graphdrawing.org/xmlns"
         xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
         xsi:schemaLocation="http://graphml.graphdrawing.org/xmlns
        http://graphml.graphdrawing.org/xmlns/1.0/graphml.xsd">
    <key id="name" for="node" attr.name="name" attr.type="string"/>
    <key id="age" for="edge" attr.name="age" attr.type="int"/>
    <graph id="G" edgedefault="directed">
        <node id="1">
            <data key="name">Thomas Anderson</data>
        </node>
        <node id="2">
            <data key="name">Trinity</data>
        </node>
        <node id="3">
            <data key="name">Morpheus</data>
        </node>
        <node id="4">
            <data key="name">Agent Smith</data>
        </node>
        <node id="5">
            <data key="name">The Architect</data>
        </node>
        <edge id="1" source="0" target="1" label="NEO_NODE">
        </edge>
        <edge id="2" source="1" target="2" label="KNOWS">
            <data key="age">3</data>
        </edge>
        <edge id="3" source="1" target="3" label="KNOWS">
            <data key="age">5</data>
        </edge>
        <edge id="4" source="2" target="3" label="KNOWS">
            <data key="age">18</data>
        </edge>
        <edge id="5" source="3" target="4" label="KNOWS">
            <data key="age">20</data>
        </edge>
        <edge id="6" source="4" target="5" label="CODED_BY">
            <data key="age">20</data>
        </edge>
    </graph>
</graphml>

Cassandra Engine

Cassandra

Cassandra is a BigTable data model running on an Amazon Dynamo-like infrastructure.

NoSQLUnit supports Cassandra by using next classes:


Embedded com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.EmbeddedCassandra Managed com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.ManagedCassandra


: Lifecycle Management Rules


NoSQLUnit Management com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.CassandraRule


: Manager Rule

Maven Setup

To use NoSQLUnit with Cassandra you only need to add next dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.lordofthejars</groupId>
    <artifactId>nosqlunit-cassandra</artifactId>
    <version>${version.nosqlunit}</version>
</dependency>

Dataset Format

Default dataset file format in Cassandra module is json. To make compatible NoSQLUnit with Cassandra-Unit file format, DataLoader of Cassandra-Unit project is used, so same json format file is used.

Datasets must have next format :

{
    "name" : "",
    "replicationFactor" : "",
    "strategy" : "",
    "columnFamilies" : [{
        "name" : "",
        "type" : "",
        "keyType" : "",
        "comparatorType" : "",
        "subComparatorType" : "",
        "defaultColumnValueType" : "",
        "comment" : "",
        "compactionStrategy" : "",
        "compactionStrategyOptions" : [{
            "name" : "",
            "value": ""
        }],
        "gcGraceSeconds" : "",
        "maxCompactionThreshold" : "",
        "minCompactionThreshold" : "",
        "readRepairChance" : "",
        "replicationOnWrite" : "",
        "columnsMetadata" : [{
            "name" : "",
            "validationClass : "",
            "indexType" : "",
            "indexName" : ""
        },
        ...
        ]
        "rows" : [{
            "key" : "",
            "columns" : [{
                "name" : "",
                "value" : ""
            },
            ...
            ],
            ...
            // OR
            ...
            "superColumns" : [{
                "name" : "",
                "columns" : [{
                    "name" : "",
                    "value" : ""
                },
                ...
                ]
            },
            ...
            ]
        },
        ...
        ]
    },
    ...
    ]
}

See Cassandra-Unit Dataset format for more information.

Getting Started

Lifecycle Management Strategy

First step is defining which lifecycle management strategy is required for your tests. Depending on kind of test you are implementing (unit test, integration test, deployment test, ...) you will require an embedded approach, managed approach or remote approach.

Embedded Lifecycle

To configure embedded approach you should only instantiate next rule :

@ClassRule
public static EmbeddedCassandra embeddedCassandraRule = newEmbeddedCassandraRule().build();

By default embedded Cassandra rule uses next default values:


Target path This is the directory where Cassandra server is started and is target/cassandra-temp . Cassandra Configuration File Location of yaml configuration file. By default a configuration file is provided with correct default parameters. Host localhost Port By default port used is 9171. Port cannot be configured, and cannot be changed if you provide an alternative Cassandra Configuration File.


: Default Embedded Values

Managed Lifecycle

To configure managed approach you should only instantiate next rule :

@ClassRule
public static ManagedCassandra managedCassandra = newManagedCassandraRule().build();

By default managed Cassandra rule uses next default values but can be configured programmatically:


Target path This is the directory where Cassandra server is started and is target/cassandra-temp . CassandraPath Cassandra installation directory which by default is retrieved from CASSANDRA_HOME system environment variable. Port By default port used is 9160. If port is changed in Cassandra configuration file, this port should be configured too here.


: Default Managed Values

Warning

To start Cassandra java.home must be set. Normally this variable is already configured, you would need to do nothing.

Remote Lifecycle

Configuring remote approach does not require any special rule because you (or System like Maven ) is the responsible of starting and stopping the server. This mode is used in deployment tests where you are testing your application on real environment.

Configuring Cassandra Connection

Next step is configuring Cassandra rule in charge of maintaining Cassandra graph into known state by inserting and deleting defined datasets. You must register CassandraRule JUnit rule class, which requires a configuration parameter with information like host, port, or cluster name.

To make developer's life easier and code more readable, a fluent interface can be used to create these configuration objects. Three different kind of configuration builders exist.

Embedded Connection

The first one is for configuring a connection to embedded Cassandra .

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.EmbeddedCassandraConfigurationBuilder.newEmbeddedCassandraConfiguration;

@Rule
public CassandraRule cassandraRule = new CassandraRule(newEmbeddedCassandraConfiguration().clusterName("Test Cluster").build());

Host and port parameters are already configured.

Managed Connection

The first one is for configuring a connection to managed Cassandra .

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.ManagedCassandraConfigurationBuilder.newManagedCassandraConfiguration;

@Rule
public CassandraRule cassandraRule = new CassandraRule(newManagedCassandraConfiguration().clusterName("Test Cluster").build());

Host and port parameters are already configured with default parameters of managed lifecycle. If port is changed, this class provides a method to set it.

Remote Connection

Configuring a connection to remote Cassandra .

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.RemoteCassandraConfigurationBuilder.newRemoteCassandraConfiguration;

@Rule
public CassandraRule cassandraRule = new CassandraRule(newRemoteCassandraConfiguration().host("192.168.1.1").clusterName("Test Cluster").build());

Port parameter is already configured with default parameter of managed lifecycle. If port is changed, this class provides a method to set it. Note that host parameter must be specified in this case.

Verifying Data

@ShouldMatchDataSet is also supported for Cassandra data but we should keep in mind some considerations.

Warning

In NoSQLUnit , expectations can only be used over data, not over configuration parameters, so for example fields set in dataset file like compactionStrategy, gcGraceSeconds or maxCompactionThreshold are not used. Maybe in future will be supported but for now only data (keyspace, columnfamilyname, columns, supercolumns, ...) are supported.

Full Example

To show how to use NoSQLUnit with Cassandra , we are going to create a very simple application.

PersonManager is the business class responsible of getting and updating person's car.

public class PersonManager {

    private ColumnFamilyTemplate<String, String> template;

    public PersonManager(String clusterName, String keyspaceName, String host) {
        Cluster cluster = HFactory.getOrCreateCluster(clusterName, host);
        Keyspace keyspace = HFactory.createKeyspace(keyspaceName, cluster);

        template = new ThriftColumnFamilyTemplate<String, String>(keyspace,
                "personFamilyName", 
                                                               StringSerializer.get(),        
                                                               StringSerializer.get());

    }

    public String getCarByPersonName(String name) {
        ColumnFamilyResult<String, String> queryColumns = template.queryColumns(name);
        return queryColumns.getString("car");
    }

    public void updateCarByPersonName(String name, String car) {
        ColumnFamilyUpdater<String, String> createUpdater = template.createUpdater(name);
        createUpdater.setString("car", car);

        template.update(createUpdater);
    }

}

And now one unit test and one integration test is written:

For unit test we are going to use embedded approach:

import static org.junit.Assert.assertThat;
import static org.hamcrest.CoreMatchers.is;

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.EmbeddedCassandra.EmbeddedCassandraRuleBuilder.newEmbeddedCassandraRule;
import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.EmbeddedCassandraConfigurationBuilder.newEmbeddedCassandraConfiguration;

import org.junit.ClassRule;
import org.junit.Rule;
import org.junit.Test;

import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.annotation.UsingDataSet;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.CassandraRule;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.EmbeddedCassandra;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.core.LoadStrategyEnum;

public class WhenPersonWantsToKnowItsCar {

    @ClassRule
    public static EmbeddedCassandra embeddedCassandraRule = newEmbeddedCassandraRule().build();

    @Rule
    public CassandraRule cassandraRule = new CassandraRule(newEmbeddedCassandraConfiguration().clusterName("Test Cluster").build());


    @Test
    @UsingDataSet(locations="persons.json", loadStrategy=LoadStrategyEnum.CLEAN_INSERT)
    public void car_should_be_returned() {

        PersonManager personManager = new PersonManager("Test Cluster", "persons", "localhost:9171");
        String car = personManager.getCarByPersonName("mary");

        assertThat(car, is("ford"));

    }

}

And as integration test , the managed one:

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.ManagedCassandraConfigurationBuilder.newManagedCassandraConfiguration;
import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.ManagedCassandra.ManagedCassandraRuleBuilder.newManagedCassandraRule;

import org.junit.ClassRule;
import org.junit.Rule;
import org.junit.Test;

import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.annotation.ShouldMatchDataSet;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.annotation.UsingDataSet;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.CassandraRule;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.ManagedCassandra;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.core.LoadStrategyEnum;

public class WhenPersonWantsToUpdateItsCar {

    static {
        System.setProperty("CASSANDRA_HOME", "/opt/cassandra");
    }

    @ClassRule
    public static ManagedCassandra managedCassandra = newManagedCassandraRule().build();

    @Rule
    public CassandraRule cassandraRule = new CassandraRule(newManagedCassandraConfiguration().clusterName("Test Cluster").build());

    @Test
    @UsingDataSet(locations="persons.json", loadStrategy=LoadStrategyEnum.CLEAN_INSERT)
    @ShouldMatchDataSet(location="expected-persons.json")
    public void new_car_should_be_updated() {

        PersonManager personManager = new PersonManager("Test Cluster", "persons", "localhost:9171");
        personManager.updateCarByPersonName("john", "opel");

    }

}

Note that in both cases we are using the same dataset as initial state, which looks like:

{
    "name" : "persons",
    "columnFamilies" : [{
        "name" : "personFamilyName",
    "keyType" : "UTF8Type",
    "defaultColumnValueType" : "UTF8Type",
    "comparatorType" : "UTF8Type",
        "rows" : [{
            "key" : "john",
            "columns" : [{
                "name" : "age",
                "value" : "22"
            },
            {
                "name" : "car",
                "value" : "toyota"
            }]
        },
        {
            "key" : "mary",
            "columns" : [{
                "name" : "age",
                "value" : "33"
            },
            {
                "name" : "car",
                "value" : "ford"
            }]
        }]
    }]
}

Redis Engine

Redis

Redis is an open source, advanced key-value store. It is often referred to as a data structure server since keys can contain strings, hashes, lists, sets and sorted sets.

NoSQLUnit supports Redis by using next classes:


Embedded com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.redis.EmbeddedRedis Managed com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.redis.ManagedRedis


: Lifecycle Management Rules


NoSQLUnit Management com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.redis.RedisRule


: Manager Rule

Maven Setup

To use NoSQLUnit with Redis you only need to add next dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.lordofthejars</groupId>
    <artifactId>nosqlunit-redis</artifactId>
    <version>${version.nosqlunit}</version>
</dependency>

Dataset Format

Default dataset file format in Redis module is json.

Datasets must have next format :

{
"data":[
            {"simple": [
                {
                    "key":"key1", 
                    "value":"value1"
                }
                ]
            },
            {"list": [{
                        "key":"key3",
                        "values":[
                            {"value":"value3"},
                            {"value":"value4"}
                        ]
                      }]
            },

            {"sortset": [{
                     "key":"key4",
                     "values":[
                           {"score":2, "value":"value5" },{"score":3, "value":1 }, {"score":1, "value":"value6" }]
                 }]
            }, 
            {"hash": [
                        {
                            "key":"user",
                            "values":[
                                {"field":"name", "value":"alex"},
                                {"field":"password", "value":"alex"}
                            ]
                        }
                    ]
            },
            {"set":[{
                        "key":"key3",
                        "values":[
                            {"value":"value3"},
                            {"value":"value4"}
                        ]
                      }]
            }
]
}

Root element must be called data , and then depending on kind of structured data we need to store, one or more of next elements should appear. Note that key field is used to set the key of the element, and value field is used to set a value.

  • simple : In case we want to store simple key/value elements. This element will contain an array of key/value entries.

  • list : In case we want to store a key with a list of values. This element contain a key field for key name and values field with an array of values.

  • set In case we want to store a key within a set (no duplicates allowed). Structure is the same as list element.

  • sortset : In case we want to store a key within a sorted set. This element contain the key, and an array of values, which each one, apart from value field, also contain score field of type Number, to set the order into sorted set.

  • hash : In case we want to store a key within a map of field/value. In this case field element set the field name, and value set the value of that field.

Getting Started

Lifecycle Management Strategy

First step is defining which lifecycle management strategy is required for your tests. Depending on kind of test you are implementing (unit test, integration test, deployment test, ...) you will require an embedded approach, managed approach or remote approach.

Embedded Lifecycle

To configure embedded approach you should only instantiate next rule :

@ClassRule
    public static EmbeddedRedis embeddedRedis = newEmbeddedRedisRule().build();

By default managed Redis rule uses next default values but can be configured programmatically:


Target path This is the directory where Redis embedded instance is started and is target/redis-test-data/impermanent-db .


: Default Embedded Values

Note that target path is only used as a configuration parameter to allow multiple instances of embedded in-memory Redis engine.

For more information about embedded in-memory Redis take a tour to section: Embedded In-Memory Redis

Managed Lifecycle

To configure managed approach you should only instantiate next rule :

@ClassRule
public static ManagedRedis managedRedis = newManagedRedisRule().redisPath("/opt/redis-2.4.16").build();

By default managed Redis rule uses next default values but can be configured programmatically:


Target path This is the directory where Redis server is started and is target/redis-temp . RedisPath Cassandra installation directory which by default is retrieved from REDIS_HOME system environment variable. Port By default port used is 6379. If port is changed in Redis configuration file, this port should be configured too here. Configuration File By default Redis can work with no configuration file, it uses default values, but if we need to start Redis with an specific configuration file located in any directory file path should be set.


: Default Managed Values

Remote Lifecycle

Configuring remote approach does not require any special rule because you (or System like Maven ) is the responsible of starting and stopping the server. This mode is used in deployment tests where you are testing your application on real environment.

Configuring Redis Connection

Next step is configuring Redis rule in charge of maintaining Redis store into known state by inserting and deleting defined datasets. You must register RedisRule JUnit rule class, which requires a configuration parameter with information like host, port, or cluster name.

To make developer's life easier and code more readable, a fluent interface can be used to create these configuration objects. Three different kind of configuration builders exist.

Embedded Connection

The first one is for configuring an embedded connection to managed Redis .

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.redis.RedisRule.RedisRuleBuilder.newRedisRule;

@Rule
public RedisRule redisRule = newRedisRule().defaultEmbeddedRedis();

Managed Connection

Configuring a connection to managed Redis .

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.redis.ManagedRedisConfigurationBuilder.newManagedRedisConfiguration;

@Rule
public RedisRule redisRule = new RedisRule(newManagedRedisConfiguration().build());

Host and port parameters are already configured with default parameters of managed lifecycle. If port is changed, this class provides a method to set it.

Remote Connection

Configuring a connection to remote Redis .

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.redis.RemoteRedisConfigurationBuilder.newRemoteRedisConfiguration;

@Rule
public RedisRule redisRule = new RedisRule(newRemoteRedisConfiguration().host("192.168.1.1").build());

Port parameter is already configured with default parameter of managed lifecycle. If port is changed, this class provides a method to set it. Note that host parameter must be specified in this case.

Shard Connection

Redis connection also be configured as shard using ShardedJedis capabilities.

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.redis.RemoteRedisConfigurationBuilder.newRemoteRedisConfiguration;

@Rule
public RedisRule redisRule = new RedisRule(newShardedRedisConfiguration()
                .shard(host("127.0.0.1"), port(ManagedRedis.DEFAULT_PORT))
                    .password("a")
                    .timeout(1000)
                    .weight(1000)
                .shard(host("127.0.0.1"), port(ManagedRedis.DEFAULT_PORT + 1))
                    .password("b")
                    .timeout(3000)
                    .weight(3000)
                .build(););

Note that only host and port is mandatory, the other ones uses default values.

  • password : In case repository is protected with password this attribute is used as password. Default values is null.

  • timeout : Timeout for shard. By default timeout is set to 2 seconds.

  • weight : The weight of that shard over the other ones. By default is 1.

Verifying Data

@ShouldMatchDataSet is also supported for Redis engine.

Full Example

To show how to use NoSQLUnit with Redis , we are going to create a very simple application.

BookManager is the business class responsible of inserting new books and finding books by their title.

public class BookManager {

    private static final String TITLE_FIELD_NAME = "title";
    private static final String NUMBER_OF_PAGES = "numberOfPages";

    private Jedis jedis;

    public BookManager(Jedis jedis) {
        this.jedis = jedis;
    }

    public void insertBook(Book book) {

        Map<String, String> fields = new HashMap<String, String>();

        fields.put(TITLE_FIELD_NAME, book.getTitle());
        fields.put(NUMBER_OF_PAGES, Integer.toString(book.getNumberOfPages()));

        jedis.hmset(book.getTitle(), fields);
    }

    public Book findBookByTitle(String title) {

        Map<String, String> fields = jedis.hgetAll(title);
        return new Book(fields.get(TITLE_FIELD_NAME), Integer.parseInt(fields.get(NUMBER_OF_PAGES)));

    }

}

And now one integration test is written:

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.redis.RedisRule.RedisRuleBuilder.newRedisRule;
import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.redis.ManagedRedis.ManagedRedisRuleBuilder.newManagedRedisRule;

import static org.junit.Assert.assertThat;
import static org.hamcrest.CoreMatchers.is;

import org.junit.ClassRule;
import org.junit.Rule;
import org.junit.Test;

import redis.clients.jedis.Jedis;

import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.annotation.UsingDataSet;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.core.LoadStrategyEnum;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.demo.model.Book;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.redis.ManagedRedis;
import com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.redis.RedisRule;

public class WhenYouFindABook {

    static {
        System.setProperty("REDIS_HOME", "/opt/redis-2.4.16");
    }

    @ClassRule
    public static ManagedRedis managedRedis = newManagedRedisRule().build();

    @Rule
    public RedisRule redisRule = newRedisRule().defaultManagedRedis();

    @Test
    @UsingDataSet(locations="book.json", loadStrategy=LoadStrategyEnum.CLEAN_INSERT)
    public void book_should_be_returned_if_title_is_in_database() {

        BookManager bookManager = new BookManager(new Jedis("localhost"));
        Book findBook = bookManager.findBookByTitle("The Hobbit");

        assertThat(findBook, is(new Book("The Hobbit", 293)));

    }

}

And dataset used is:

{
"data":[    
            {"hash": [
                        {
                            "key":"The Hobbit",
                            "values":[
                                {"field":"title", "value":"The Hobbit"},
                                {"field":"numberOfPages", "value":"293"}
                            ]
                        }
                    ]
            }
]
}

HBase Engine

HBase

Apache HBase is an open-source, distributed, versioned, column-oriented store.

NoSQLUnit supports HBase by using next classes:


Embedded com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.hbase.EmbeddedHBase Managed com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.hbase.ManagedHBase


: Lifecycle Management Rules


NoSQLUnit Management com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.hbase.HBaseRule


: Manager Rule

Maven Setup

To use NoSQLUnit with HBase you only need to add next dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.lordofthejars</groupId>
    <artifactId>nosqlunit-hbase</artifactId>
    <version>${version.nosqlunit}</version>
</dependency>

Dataset Format

Default dataset file format in HBase module is json. Dataset in HBase is the same used by Cassandra-Unit but not all fields are supported. Only fields available in TSV HBase application can be set into dataset.

So as summary datasets must have next format :

{
    "name" : "tablename",
    "columnFamilies" : [{
        "name" : "columnFamilyName",
        "rows" : [{
            "key" : "key1",
            "columns" : [{
                "name" : "columnName",
                "value" : "columnValue"
            },
            ...
            ]
        },
        ...
        ]
    },
    ...
    ]
}

Getting Started

Lifecycle Management Strategy

First step is defining which lifecycle management strategy is required for your tests. Depending on kind of test you are implementing (unit test, integration test, deployment test, ...) you will require an embedded approach, managed approach or remote approach.

Embedded Lifecycle

To configure embedded approach you should only instantiate next rule :

@ClassRule
public static EmbeddedHBase embeddedHBase = newEmbeddedHBaseRule().build();

By default embedded Embedded rule uses HBaseTestingUtility default values:


Target path This is the directory where HBase stores data and is target/data . Host localhost Port By default port used is 60000. File Permissions Depending on your umask configuration, HBaseTestingUtility will create some directories that will not be accessible during runtime. By default this value is set to 775, but depending on your OS you may require a different value.


: Default Embedded Values

Managed Lifecycle

To configure managed approach you should only instantiate next rule :

@ClassRule
public static ManagedHBase managedHBase = newManagedHBaseServerRule().build();

By default managed HBase rule uses next default values but can be configured programmatically:


Target path This is the directory where HBase server is started and is target/hbase-temp . HBasePath HBase installation directory which by default is retrieved from HBASE_HOME system environment variable. Port By default port used is 60000. If port is changed in HBase configuration file, this port should be configured too here.


: Default Managed Values

Warning

To start HBASE JAVA_HOME must be set. Normally this variable is already configured, so you would need to do nothing.

Remote Lifecycle

Configuring remote approach does not require any special rule because you (or System like Maven ) is the responsible of starting and stopping the server. This mode is used in deployment tests where you are testing your application on real environment.

Configuring HBase Connection

Next step is configuring HBase rule in charge of maintaining HBase columns into known state by inserting and deleting defined datasets. You must register HBaseRule JUnit rule class, which requires a configuration parameter with some information.

To make developer's life easier and code more readable, a fluent interface can be used to create these configuration objects. Three different kind of configuration builders exist.

Embedded Connection

The first one is for configuring a connection to embedded HBase .

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.hbase.EmbeddedHBase.EmbeddedHBaseRuleBuilder.newEmbeddedHBaseRule;

@Rule
public HBaseRule hBaseRule = newHBaseRule().defaultEmbeddedHBase();

Embedded HBase does not require any special parameter. Configuration object is copied from Embedded rule directly to HBaseRule.

Managed Connection

This is for configuring a connection to managed HBase .

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.hbase.ManagedHBaseConfigurationBuilder.newManagedHBaseConfiguration;

@Rule
public HBaseRule hbaseRule = new HBaseRule(newManagedHBaseConfiguration().build());

By default configuration used is the one loaded by calling HBaseConfiguration.create() method. HBaseConfiguration.create() which uses hbase-site.xml and hbase-default.xml classpath files.

But also a method setProperty method is provided to modify any parameter of generated configuration object.

Remote Connection

Configuring a connection to remote HBase uses same approach like ManagedHBase configuration object but using com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.hbase.RemoteHBaseConfigurationBuilder class instead of com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.hbase.ManagedHBaseConfigurationBuilder. .

Warning

Working with Apache HBase required a bit of knowledge about how it works. For example your /etc/hosts file cannot contain a reference to your host name with ip 127.0.1.1.

Moreover NoSQLUnit uses HBase-0.94.1 and this version should be also installed in your computer to work with managed or remote approach. If you install another version, you should exclude these artifacts from NoSQLUnit dependencies, and add the new ones manually to your pom file.

Verifying Data

@ShouldMatchDataSet is also supported for HBase data but we should keep in mind some considerations.

If you plan to verify data with @ShouldMatchDataSet in Managed and Remote approach, you should enable Aggregate coprocessor by editing hbase-site-xml file and adding next lines:

<property>
    <name>hbase.coprocessor.user.region.classes</name>
    <value>org.apache.hadoop.hbase.coprocessor.AggregateImplementation</value>
</property>

Full Example

To show how to use NoSQLUnit with HBase , we are going to create a very simple application.

PersonManager is the business class responsible of getting and updating person's car.

public class PersonManager {

    private Configuration configuration;

    public PersonManager(Configuration configuration) {
        this.configuration = configuration;     
    }

    public String getCarByPersonName(String personName) throws IOException {
        HTable table = new HTable(configuration, "person");
        Get get = new Get("john".getBytes());
        Result result = table.get(get);

        return new String(result.getValue(toByteArray().convert("personFamilyName"), toByteArray().convert("car")));
    }

    private Converter<String, byte[]> toByteArray() {
        return new Converter<String, byte[]>() {

            @Override
            public byte[] convert(String element) {
                return element.getBytes();
            }
        };
    }

}

And now one unit test is written:

For unit test we are going to use embedded approach:

public class WhenPersonWantsToKnowItsCar {

    @ClassRule
    public static EmbeddedHBase embeddedHBase = newEmbeddedHBaseRule().build();

    @Rule
    public HBaseRule hBaseRule = newHBaseRule().defaultEmbeddedHBase(this);

    @Inject
    private Configuration configuration;


    @Test
    @UsingDataSet(locations="persons.json", loadStrategy=LoadStrategyEnum.CLEAN_INSERT)
    public void car_should_be_returned() throws IOException {

        PersonManager personManager = new PersonManager(configuration);
        String car = personManager.getCarByPersonName("john");

        assertThat(car, is("toyota"));      
    }

}

And dataset used is:

{
    "name" : "person",
    "columnFamilies" : [{
        "name" : "personFamilyName",
        "rows" : [{
            "key" : "john",
            "columns" : [{
                "name" : "age",
                "value" : "22"
            },
            {
                "name" : "car",
                "value" : "toyota"
            }]
        },
        {
            "key" : "mary",
            "columns" : [{
                "name" : "age",
                "value" : "33"
            },
            {
                "name" : "car",
                "value" : "ford"
            }]
        }]
    }]
}

CouchDB Engine

CouchDB

CouchDB is a NoSQL database that stores structured data as JSON-like documents with dynamic schemas.

NoSQLUnit supports CouchDB by using next classes:


Managed com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.couchdb.ManagedCouchDb


: Lifecycle Management Rules


NoSQLUnit Management com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.couchdb.CouchDbRule


: Manager Rule

Maven Setup

To use NoSQLUnit with CouchDB you only need to add next dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.lordofthejars</groupId>
    <artifactId>nosqlunit-couchdb</artifactId>
    <version>${version.nosqlunit}</version>
</dependency>

Dataset Format

Default dataset file format in CouchDB module is json .

Datasets must have next format :

{
    "data":
            [
                {"attribute1":"value1", "atribute2":"value2", ...},
                {...}
            ]
}

Notice that if attributes value are integers, double quotes are not required.

Getting Started

Lifecycle Management Strategy

First step is defining which lifecycle management strategy is required for your tests. Depending on kind of test you are implementing (unit test, integration test, deployment test, ...) you will require an managed approach or remote approach.

There is no CouchDB inmemory instance, so only managed or remote lifecycle can be used.

To configure the managed way, you should use ManagedCouchDb rule and may require some configuration parameters.

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.couchdb.ManagedCouchDb.ManagedCouchDbRuleBuilder.newManagedCouchDbRule;

@ClassRule
public static ManagedCouchDb managedCouchDb = newManagedCouchDbRule().couchDbPath("/usr/local").build(); 

By default managed CouchDB rule uses next default values:

  • CouchDB installation directory is retrieved from COUCHDB_HOME system environment variable.

  • Target path, that is the directory where CouchDB server is started, is target/couchdb-temp .

  • Port where CouchDB will be started. Note that this parameter is used only as information, if you change port from configuration file you should change this parameter too. By default*CouchDB* server is started at 5984 .

Configuring remote approach does not require any special rule because you (or System like Maven ) is the responsible of starting and stopping the server. This mode is used in deployment tests where you are testing your application on real environment.

Configuring CouchDB Connection

Next step is configuring CouchDB rule in charge of maintaining CouchDB database into known state by inserting and deleting defined datasets. You must register CouchDbRule JUnit rule class, which requires a configuration parameter with information like host, port or database name.

To make developer's life easier and code more readable, a fluent interface can be used to create these configuration objects.


URI http://localhost5984 Authentication No authentication parameters. Enable SSL false. Relaxed SSL Settings false. Caching True.


: Default Managed Configuration Values

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.couchdb.CouchDbRule.CouchDbRuleBuilder.newCouchDbRule;

@Rule
public CouchDbRule couchDbRule = newCouchDbRule().defaultManagedCouchDb("books");

Complete Example

Consider a library application, which apart from multiple operations, it allow us to add new books to system. Our model is as simple as:

public class Book {

    private String title;

    private int numberOfPages;

    public Book(String title, int numberOfPages) {
        super();
        this.title = title;
        this.numberOfPages = numberOfPages;
    }

    public void setTitle(String title) {
        this.title = title;
    }

    public void setNumberOfPages(int numberOfPages) {
        this.numberOfPages = numberOfPages;
    }


    public String getTitle() {
        return title;
    }

    public int getNumberOfPages() {
        return numberOfPages;
    }
}

Next business class is the responsible of managing access to CouchDB server:

private CouchDbConnector connector;

    public BookManager(CouchDbConnector connector)  {
        this.connector = connector;
    }

    public void create(Book book) {
        connector.create(MapBookConverter.toMap(book));
    }

    public Book findBookById(String id) {
        Map<String, Object> map = connector.get(Map.class, id);
        return MapBookConverter.toBook(map);
    }

And now it is time for testing. In next test we are going to validate that a book is found into database.

public class WhenYouFindBooksById {

    @ClassRule
    public static ManagedCouchDb managedCouchDb = newManagedCouchDbRule().couchDbPath("/usr/local").build(); 

    @Rule
    public CouchDbRule couchDbRule = newCouchDbRule().defaultManagedCouchDb("books");

    @Inject
    private CouchDbConnector couchDbConnector;

    @Test
    @UsingDataSet(locations="books.json", loadStrategy=LoadStrategyEnum.CLEAN_INSERT)
    public void identified_book_should_be_returned() {

        BookManager bookManager = new BookManager(couchDbConnector);
        Book book = bookManager.findBookById("1");

        assertThat(book.getTitle(), is("The Hobbit"));
        assertThat(book.getNumberOfPages(), is(293));

    }

}
{
    "data":
            [
                {"_id":"1", "title":"The Hobbit","numberOfPages":"293"}
            ]
}

You can watch full example at github .

Infinispan Engine

Infinispan

Infinispan is an open-source transactional in-memory key/value NoSQL datastore & Data Grid.

NoSQLUnit supports Infinispan by using next classes:


Embedded com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.infinispan.EmbeddedInfinispan Managed com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.infinispan.ManagedInfinispan


: Lifecycle Management Rules


NoSQLUnit Management com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.infinispan.InfinispanRule


: Manager Rule

Maven Setup

To use NoSQLUnit with HBase you only need to add next dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.lordofthejars</groupId>
    <artifactId>nosqlunit-infinispan</artifactId>
    <version>${version.nosqlunit}</version>
</dependency>

Dataset Format

Default dataset file format in Infinispan module is json. With this dataset you can define the key and the value that will be inserted into Infinispan. Value can be a simple types like Integer, String, ..., collection types, like set and list implementations or objects (using default Jackson rules (no annotations required).

So as summary datasets must have next format :

{ 
    "data": [
                {
                    "key":"alex", 
                    "implementation":"com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.demo.infinispan.User", 
                    "value": {
                                "name":"alex",
                                "age":32
                             } 
                },
                { 
                    "key":"key1", 
                    "value":1 
                },
                { 
                    "key":"key2",  
                    "implementation":"java.util.HashSet", 
                    "value": [{"value":"a"},{"value":"b"}]
                }

            ] 
}

Note that first key is inserting an object. You should set its implementation, and set the object properties in json format so Jackson can create the required object. User object only contains getter and setters of properties. The second key is a simple key, in this case an integer. The third one is a set of strings. See that we must provide the implementation of collection or an ArrayList will be used as default. Also you can define objects instead of simple types.

Getting Started

Lifecycle Management Strategy

First step is defining which lifecycle management strategy is required for your tests. Depending on kind of test you are implementing (unit test, integration test, deployment test, ...) you will require an embedded approach, managed approach or remote approach.

Embedded Lifecycle

To configure embedded approach you should only instantiate next rule :

@ClassRule
    public static final EmbeddedInfinispan EMBEDDED_INFINISPAN = newEmbeddedInfinispanRule().build();

By default embedded Embedded rule uses EmbeddedCacheManager with default values:


Target path This is the directory used for starting Embedded Infinispan and by default is target/infinispan-test-data/impermanent-db, . Configuration File Configuration file used by Infinispan for configuring the grid. By default no configuration file is provided and default Infinispan internal values are used.


: Default Embedded Values

Managed Lifecycle

To configure managed approach you should only instantiate next rule :

@ClassRule
    public static ManagedInfinispan managedInfinispan = newManagedInfinispanRule().infinispanPath("/opt/infinispan-5.1.6").build(); 

By default managed Infinispan rule uses next default values but can be configured programmatically:


Target path This is the directory where Infinispan server is started and is target/infinispan-temp . InfinispanPath Infinispan installation directory which by default is retrieved from INFINISPAN_HOME system environment variable. Port By default port used is 11222. Protocol By default hotrod is used and internally NoSQLUnit uses hotrod too, so it should be desirable to no change it.


Remote Lifecycle

Configuring remote approach does not require any special rule because you (or System like Maven ) is the responsible of starting and stopping the server. This mode is used in deployment tests where you are testing your application on real environment.

Configuring Infinispan Connection

Next step is configuring Infinispan rule in charge of maintaining Infinispan columns into known state by inserting and deleting defined datasets. You must register InfinispanRule JUnit rule class, which requires a configuration parameter with some information.

To make developer's life easier and code more readable, a fluent interface can be used to create these configuration objects. Three different kind of configuration builders exist.

Embedded Connection

The first one is for configuring a connection to embedded Infinispan .

com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.infinispan.InfinispanRule.InfinispanRuleBuilder.newInfinispanRule;

@Rule
public InfinispanRule infinispanRule = newInfinispanRule().defaultEmbeddedInfinispan();

Embedded Infinispan does not require any special parameter. But you can use com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.infinispan.EmbeddedInfinispanConfigurationBuilder class for creatinga custom configuration object for setting cache name.

Managed Connection

This is for configuring a connection to managed Infinispan .

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.infinispan.ManagedInfinispanConfigurationBuilder.newManagedInfinispanConfiguration;

@Rule
public InfinispanRule infinispanRule = newInfinispanRule.configure(newManagedHBaseConfiguration().build()).build();

By default the port used is the 11222, and configuration is used the default ones provided by Infinispan. You can also set the configuration properties (used by hotrod client) and cache name.

Remote Connection

Configuring a connection to remote Infinispan uses same approach like ManagedInfinispan configuration object but using com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.infinispan.RemoteInfinispanConfigurationBuilder class. .

Verifying Data

@ShouldMatchDataSet is also supported for Infinispan data but we should keep in mind some considerations.

If you plan to verify data with @ShouldMatchDataSet and POJO objects equals method is used, so implements it accordantly.

Full Example

To show how to use NoSQLUnit with Infinispan , we are going to create a very simple application.

UserManager is the business class responsible of getting and addinga user to the system.

public class UserManager {

    private BasicCache<String, User> cache;

    public UserManager(BasicCache<String, User> cache) {
        this.cache = cache;
    }

    public void addUser(User user) {
        this.cache.put(user.getName(), user);
    }

    public User getUser(String name) {
        return this.cache.get(name);
    }

}

And now one unit test is written:

For unit test we are going to use embedded approach:

public class WhenUserIsFoundByName {

    @ClassRule
    public static final EmbeddedInfinispan EMBEDDED_INFINISPAN = newEmbeddedInfinispanRule().build();

    @Rule
    public final InfinispanRule infinispanRule = newInfinispanRule().defaultEmbeddedInfinispan();

    @Inject
    private BasicCache<String, User> embeddedCache;

    @Test
    @UsingDataSet(locations="user.json", loadStrategy=LoadStrategyEnum.CLEAN_INSERT)
    public void user_should_be_returned() {

        UserManager userManager = new UserManager(embeddedCache);
        User user = userManager.getUser("alex");

        assertThat(user, is(new User("alex", 32)));
    }


}

And dataset used is:

{ 
    "data": [
                {
                    "key":"alex", 
                    "implementation":"com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.demo.infinispan.User", 
                    "value": {
                                "name":"alex",
                                "age":32
                             } 
                }
            ] 
}

And one integration test is written:

For integration test we are going to use managed approach:

public class WhenUserIsInserted {

    @ClassRule
    public static final ManagedInfinispan MANAGED_INFINISPAN = newManagedInfinispanRule().infinispanPath("/opt/infinispan-5.1.6").build();

    @Rule
    public final InfinispanRule infinispanRule = newInfinispanRule().defaultManagedInfinispan();

    @Inject
    private BasicCache<String, User> remoteCache;

    @UsingDataSet(loadStrategy=LoadStrategyEnum.DELETE_ALL)
    @ShouldMatchDataSet(location="user.json")
    @Test
    public void user_should_be_available_in_cache() {

        UserManager userManager = new UserManager(remoteCache);
        userManager.addUser(new User("alex", 32));
    }

}

Elasticsearch Engine

Elasticsearch

ElasticSearch is a distributed, RESTful, free/open source search server based on Apache Lucene.

NoSQLUnit supports Elasticsearch by using next classes:


In Memory com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.elasticsearch.EmbeddedElasticsearch Managed com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.elasticsearch.ManagedElasticsearch


: Lifecycle Management Rules


NoSQLUnit Management com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.elasticsearch.ElasticsearchRule


: Manager Rule

Maven Setup

To use NoSQLUnit with Elasticsearch you only need to add next dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.lordofthejars</groupId>
    <artifactId>nosqlunit-elasticsearch</artifactId>
    <version>${version.nosqlunit}</version>
</dependency>

Dataset Format

Default dataset file format in Elasticsearch module is json .

Datasets must have next format:

{
   "documents":[
      {
         "document":[
            {
               "index":{
                  "indexName":"indexName1",
                  "indexType":"indexType1",
                  "indexId":"indexId1"
               }
            },
        {
               "index":{
                  "indexName":"indexName2",
                  "indexType":"indexType2",
                  "indexId":"indexId2"
               }
            },
            {
               "data":{
                  "property1":"value1",
                  "property2": value2
               }
            }
         ]
      },
      ...
   ]
}

Notice that if attributes value are integers, double quotes are not required. Also you can define as many index subdocuments as required, but only one data document which will be inserted into Elasticsearch. Moreover property indexId is only mandatory if you want to use the inserted data to be validated with @ShouldMatchDataSet. Document index is used to run comparisions faster than retrieving all data. If you are not planning to use the expectations capability of NoSQLUnit then you are not required to set indexId property and Elasticsearch will provie one for you.

Getting Started

Lifecycle Management Strategy

First step is defining which lifecycle management strategy is required for your tests. Depending on kind of test you are implementing (unit test, integration test, deployment test, ...) you will require an embedded approach, managed approach or remote approach.

Embedded

To configure embedded approach you should only instantiate next rule:

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.elasticsearch.EmbeddedElasticsearch.EmbeddedElasticsearchRuleBuilder.newEmbeddedElasticsearchRule;

@ClassRule
public static final EmbeddedElasticsearch EMBEDDED_ELASTICSEARCH = newEmbeddedElasticsearchRule().build();

By default Elasticsearch Node is started with property local set to true, but this property and all other supported properties can be configured or you can still use the default configuration approach provided by Elasticsearch by creating elasticsearch.yml file into classpath.

Data will be stored in target/elasticsearch-test-data/impermanent-db directory.

Managed

To configure the managed way, we should use ManagedElasticsearch rule and may require some configuration parameters.

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.elasticsearch.ManagedElasticsearch.ManagedElasticsearchRuleBuilder.newManagedElasticsearchRule;

@ClassRule
public static final ManagedElasticsearch MANAGED_ELASTICSEARCH = newManagedElasticsearchRule().elasticsearchPath("/opt/elasticsearch-0.20.5").build();

By default managed Elasticsearch rule uses next default values:

  • Elasticsearch installation directory is retrieved from ES_HOME system environment variable.

  • Target path, that is the directory where Elasticsearch server is started target/elasticsearch-temp .

ManagedElasticsearch can be created from scratch, but for making life easier, a DSL is provided using ManagedElasticsearchRuleBuilder class as seen in previous example.

Remote

Configuring remote approach does not require any special rule because you (or System like Maven ) is the responsible of starting and stopping the server. This mode is used in deployment tests where you are testing your application on real environment.

Configuring Elasticsearch Connection

Next step is configuring Elasticsearch rule in charge of maintaining Elasticsearch database into known state by inserting and deleting defined datasets. You must register ElasticsearchRule JUnit rule class, which requires a configuration parameter with information like host, port or database name.

To make developer's life easier and code more readable, a fluent interface can be used to create these configuration objects. Three different kind of configuration builders exist.

Embedded

The first one is for configuring a connection to embedded Node instance. For almost all cases default parameters are enough.

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.elasticsearch.ElasticsearchRule.ElasticsearchRuleBuilder.newElasticsearchRule;

@Rule
public ElasticsearchRule elasticsearchRule = newElasticsearchRule().defaultEmbeddedElasticsearch();

If you need to customize embedded connection we can use EmbeddedElasticsearchConfigurationBuilder class builder.

Managed

The second one is for configuring a connection to managed/remote Elasticsearch server. Default values are:


Host localhost Port 9300


And you can create a managed connection with default values as shown in next example:

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.elasticsearch.ElasticsearchRule.ElasticsearchRuleBuilder.newElasticsearchRule;

@Rule
public ElasticsearchRule elasticsearchRule = newElasticsearchRule().defaultManagedElasticsearch();

But you can cusomize connection parameters by using ManagedElasticsearchConfigurationBuilder class. There you can set the Settings class and define the transport port.

Remote

Moreover we can also use RemoteElasticsearchConfigurationBuilder which allows us to set the host.

@Rule
public ElasticsearchRule elasticsearchRule = newElasticsearchRule().configure(remoteElasticsearch().host("10.0.10.1").build()).build();

Full Example

Dataset used:

{
   "documents":[
      {
         "document":[
            {
               "index":{
                  "indexName":"books",
                  "indexType":"book",
                  "indexId":"1"
               }
            },
            {
               "data":{
                  "title":"The Hobbit",
                  "numberOfPages":293
               }
            }
         ]
      }
   ]
}

Managed test:

@ClassRule
public static final ManagedElasticsearch MANAGED_EALSTICSEARCH = newManagedElasticsearchRule().elasticsearchPath("/opt/elasticsearch-0.20.5").build();

@Rule
public ElasticsearchRule elasticsearchRule = newElasticsearchRule().defaultManagedElasticsearch();

@Inject
private Client client;

@Test
@UsingDataSet(locations="books.json", loadStrategy=LoadStrategyEnum.CLEAN_INSERT)
public void all_books_should_be_returned() {

    BookManager bookManager = new BookManager(client);
    List<Book> books = bookManager.searchAllBooks();

    assertThat(books, hasItems(new Book("The Hobbit", 293)));

}

Advanced Usage

Customizing Insertion and Comparation strategy

NoSQLUnit provides a default dataset format, for example in case of Neo4j we are providing a GraphML format, or in case of Cassandra we are offering cassandra-unit format. But because you may have already written datasets in another format, or because you feel more comfortable with another format, NoSQLUnit provides a way to extend the behaviour of insertion and comparation action.

To create an extension, each engine offers two interfaces (one for insertion and one comparation). They are called with the form:

<engine>ComparisonStrategy and <engine>InsertionStrategy. For example CassandraComparisonStrategy or Neo4jInsertionStrategy.

They provide a method for insert/compare data with inputstream of defined dataset file, and a callback interface with all connection objects.

Apart of that, each engine has a default implementation Default<engine>ComparisonStrategy and Default<engine>InsertionStrategy that can be used as a guide for developing your own extensions.

To register each strategy we must use @CustomInsertionStrategy and @CustomComparisonStrategy annotations.

Let's see a very simple example where we are defining an alternative insertation strategy of Redis system by using properties file instead of json.

public class PropertiesCustomInsertion implements RedisInsertionStrategy {

    @Override
    public void insert(RedisConnectionCallback connection, InputStream dataset) throws Throwable {
        Properties properties = new Properties();
        properties.load(dataset);

        BinaryJedisCommands insertionJedis = connection.insertionJedis();

        Set<Entry<Object, Object>> entrySet = properties.entrySet();

        for (Entry<Object, Object> entry : entrySet) {
            String key = (String) entry.getKey();
            String value = (String) entry.getValue();
            insertionJedis.set(key.getBytes(), value.getBytes());
        }

    }

}

And test:

@CustomInsertionStrategy(insertionStrategy = PropertiesCustomInsertion.class)
public class WhenPropertiesCustomInsertionStrategyIsRegistered {

    @ClassRule
    public static EmbeddedRedis embeddedRedis = newEmbeddedRedisRule().build();

    @Rule
    public RedisRule redisRule = newRedisRule().defaultEmbeddedRedis();

    @Inject
    public Jedis jedis;

    @Test
    @UsingDataSet(locations="data.properties", loadStrategy=LoadStrategyEnum.CLEAN_INSERT)
    public void data_should_be_inserted_from_properties_file() {
        String name = jedis.get("name");
        String surname = jedis.get("surname");

        assertThat(name, is("alex"));
        assertThat(surname, is("soto"));
    }

}

Warning

Custom annotations are only valid on type scope. The custom strategy will be applied to whole test.

When using custom strategies for inserting and comparing data, location attribute of @UsingDataSet and @ShouldMatchDataSet must be specified.

Embedded In-Memory Redis

When you are writing unit tests you should keep in mind that they must run fast, which implies, among other things, no interaction with IO subsystem (disk, network, ...). To avoid this interaction in database unit tests, there are embedded in-memory databases like H2 , HSQLDB , Derby or in case of NoSQL , engines like Neo4j or Cassandra have their own implementation. But Redis does not have any way to create an embedded in-memory instance in Java. For this reason I have written an embedded in-memory Redis implementation based on Jedis project.

If you are using NoSQLUnit you only have to register embedded Redis rule as described here , and internally NoSQLUnit will create instance for you, and you will be able to inject the instance into your code.

But also can be used outside umbrella of NoSQLUnit , by instantiating manually, as described in next example:

EmbeddedRedisBuilder embeddedRedisBuilder = new EmbeddedRedisBuilder();
Jedis jedis = embeddedRedisBuilder.createEmbeddedJedis();   

Notice that Jedis class is the main class defined by Jedis project but proxied to use in-memory data instead of sending requests to remote server.

Almost all Redis operations have been implemented but it has some limitations:

  • Connection commands do nothing, they do not throw any exception but neither do any action. In fact would not have sense that they do something.

  • Scripting commands are not supported, and an UnsupportedOperationException will be thrown if they are called.

  • Transaction commands are not supported, but they do not throw any exception, simply returns a null value and in cases of List return type, an empty list is returned.

  • Pub/Sub commands do nothing.

  • Server commands are implemented, but there are some commands that have no sense and returns a constant result:

    move always return 1.

    debug commands throws an UnsupportedOperationException.

    bgrewriteaof, save, bgsave, configSet, configResetStat, salveOf, slaveOfNone and slowLogReset returns an OK.

    configGet, slowLogGet and slowLogGetBinary returns an empty list.

  • From Key commands, only sort by pattern is not supported.

All the other operations, including flushing, expiration control, and each operation of every datatype is supported in the same way Jedis support it. Note that expiration management is also implemented as described in Redis manual.

Warning

This implementation of Redis is provided for testing purposes not as a substitution of Redis. Feel free to notify any issue of this implementation so can be fixed or implemented.

Managing lifecycle of multiple instances

Sometimes your test will require that more than one instance of same database server (running in different ports) was started. For example for testing database sharding. In next example we see how to configure NoSQLUnit to manage lifecycle of multiple instances.

@ClassRule
public static ManagedRedis managedRedis79 = newManagedRedisRule().redisPath("/opt/redis-2.4.16")
                                                                 .targetPath("target/redis1")
                                                                 .configurationPath(getAbsoluteFilePath("src/test/resources/redis_6379.conf"))
                                                                 .port(6379)
                                            .build();

@ClassRule
public static ManagedRedis managedRedis80 = newManagedRedisRule().redisPath("/opt/redis-2.4.16")
                                                                 .targetPath("target/redis2")
                                                                 .configurationPath(getAbsoluteFilePath("src/test/resources/redis_6380.conf"))
                                                                 .port(6380)
                                            .build();

Warning

Note that target path should be set to different values for each instance, if not some started processes could not be shutdown.

Fast Way

When you instantiate a Rule for maintaining database into known state ( MongoDbRule , Neo4jRule , ...) NoSQLUnit requires you set a configuration object with properties like host, port, database name, ... but although most of the time default values are enough, we still need to create the configuration object, which means our code becomes harder to read.

We can avoid this by using an inner builder inside each rule, which creates for us a Rule with default parameters set. For example for Neo4jRule :

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.neo4j.Neo4jRule.Neo4jRuleBuilder.newNeo4jRule;
@Rule
public Neo4jRule neo4jRule = newNeo4jRule().defaultEmbeddedNeo4j();

In previous example Neo4jRule is configured to be used as embedded approach with default parameters.

Another example using CassandraRule in managed way.

import static com.lordofthejars.nosqlunit.cassandra.CassandraRule.CassandraRuleBuilder.newCassandraRule;
@Rule
public CassandraRule cassandraRule = newCassandraRule().defaultManagedCassandra("Test Cluster");

And each Rule contains their builder class to create default values.

Simultaneous engines

Sometimes applications will contain more than one NoSQL engine, for example some parts of your model will be expressed better as a graph ( Neo4J for example), but other parts will be more natural in a column way (for example using Cassandra ). NoSQLUnit supports this kind of scenarios by providing in integration tests a way to not load all datasets into one system, but choosing which datasets are stored in each backend.

For declaring more than one engine, you must give a name to each database Rule using connectionIdentifier() method in configuration instance.

@Rule
public MongoDbRule remoteMongoDbRule1 = new MongoDbRule(mongoDb()
                                        .databaseName("test").connectionIdentifier("one").build() ,this);

And also you need to provide an identified dataset for each engine, by using withSelectiveLocations attribute of @UsingDataSet annotation. You must set up the pair "named connection" / datasets.

@UsingDataSet(withSelectiveLocations =                                              
                { @Selective(identifier = "one", locations = "test3") }, 
            loadStrategy = LoadStrategyEnum.REFRESH)

In example we are refreshing database declared on previous example with data located at test3 file.

Also works in expectations annotation:

@ShouldMatchDataSet(withSelectiveMatcher = 
                { @SelectiveMatcher(identifier = "one", location = "test3") 
                })

When you use more than one engine at a time you should take under consideration next rules:

  • If location attribute is set, it will use it and will ignore withSelectiveMatcher attribute data. Location data is populated through all registered systems.
  • If location is not set, then system tries to insert data defined in withSelectiveMatcher attribute to each backend.
  • If withSelectiveMatcher attribute is not set, then default strategy (explained in section ) is taken. Note that default strategy will replicate all datasets to defined engines.

You can also use the same approach for inserting data into same engine but in different databases. If you have one MongoDb instance with two databases, you can also write tests for both databases at one time. For example:

@Rule
public MongoDbRule remoteMongoDbRule1 = new MongoDbRule(mongoDb()
                    .databaseName("test").connectionIdentifier("one").build() ,this);

@Rule
public MongoDbRule remoteMongoDbRule2 = new MongoDbRule(mongoDb()
                    .databaseName("test2").connectionIdentifier("two").build() ,this);

@Test
@UsingDataSet(withSelectiveLocations = {
        @Selective(identifier = "one", locations = "json.test"),
        @Selective(identifier = "two", locations = "json3.test") }, 
    loadStrategy = LoadStrategyEnum.CLEAN_INSERT)
public void my_test() {...}

Support for JSR-330

NoSQLUnit supports two annotations of JSR-330 aka Dependency Injection for Java. Concretely @Inject and @Named annotations.

During test execution you may need to access underlying class used to load and assert data to execute extra operations to backend. NoSQLUnit will inspect @Inject annotations of test fields, and try to set own driver to attribute. For example in case of MongoDb , com.mongodb.Mongo instance will be injected.

@Rule
public MongoDbRule remoteMongoDbRule1 = new MongoDbRule(mongoDb()
                        .databaseName("test").build() ,this);

@Inject
private Mongo mongo;

Warning

Note that in example we are setting this as second parameter to the Rule. This is only required in versions of JUnit prior to 4.11. In new versions is no longer required passing the this parameter.

But if you are using more than one engine at same time (see chapter ) you need a way to distinguish each connection. For fixing this problem, you must use @Named annotation by putting the identifier given in configuration instance. For example:

@Rule
public MongoDbRule remoteMongoDbRule1 = new MongoDbRule(mongoDb()
                    .databaseName("test").connectionIdentifier("one").build() ,this);

@Rule
public MongoDbRule remoteMongoDbRule2 = new MongoDbRule(mongoDb()
                    .databaseName("test2").connectionIdentifier("two").build() ,this);

@Named("one")
@Inject
private Mongo mongo1;

@Named("two")
@Inject
private Mongo mongo2;

There are some situations (mostly if using Arquillian) that you want to inject the value managed by container instead of the one managed by NoSQLUnit. To avoid an injection conflict NoSQLUnit provides an special annotation called @ByContainer. By using it, the injector processor will leave the field unttouched.

@Inject
@ByContainer
private Mongo mongo2;

Spring Data

With NoSQLUnit you can also write tests for Spring Data project. You can

Spring Data MongoDB

Spring Data Neo4j

Stay In Touch

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