An automatic testing tool for Java software
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README.md

Introduction

JDoop (previously known as JPF-Doop) is a free software testing tool for Java software. It is based on the Java PathFinder's concolic execution engine JDart and Randoop, a feedback-directed random testing engine. More detailed description of JDoop can be found in an extended abstract by Marko Dimjašević and Zvonimir Rakamarić: JPF-Doop: Combining Concolic and Random Testing for Java.

Dependencies

JDoop includes a few tools that ship independently of JDoop, but they are bundled with JDoop for convenience: JaCoCo, JUnit version 4, and Randoop.

The following need to be obtained and configured by the user:

If the user wishes to generate code coverage reports, Apache Ant is needed too.

Installation and Configuration

After you've cloned the repository, there is no installation of JDoop because it consists of scripts written in Python. In other words, you can run JDoop as soon as you obtained a copy of it (and you have all the dependencies in place). In order to have all JDoop dependencies easily installed, you might want to take a look at an installation script install-dep.sh in the env/ directory and possibly tweak a few parameters at the very top of the script.

You can configure various parameters in jdoop.ini. Most importantly, change jpf-core and jdart in the jdoop section so that they point to the main directories of jpf-core and JDart, respectively. Do not use ~ as a shorthand for your home directory.

Configuration file

JDoop uses a configuration file. By default, it is jdoop.ini. The file is in the INI file format. It has 4 sections: [jdoop], [sut], [tests], and [lib]. For an example, see the contents of jdoop.ini.

Section [jdoop] has two options. Option jpf-core specifies a path to Java PathFinder (core module), while option jdart specifies a path to JDart.

Section [sut] has one option: compilation-directory specifies a directory where class files of the project being tested can be found.

Section [tests] has one option: compilation-directory specifies a directory where generated JUnit tests should be compiled to.

Section [lib] has three options that specify where various libraries can be found. Option junit is a path to a JUnit jar archive, while hamcrest is a path to a Hamcrest core jar archive. . Option randoop is a path to a Randoop jar archive. Finally, option jacoco is a path to a JaCoCo jar archive.

Usage

To run JDoop, a few parameters need to be passed to it, including the location of the project's source and class files. Some other arguments are optional. For example, to test all classes from the Apache Commons Net library from the JDoop-examples repository, assuming that JDoop and JDoop-examples are on the same directory hierarchy level, run the following:

python jdoop.py --root ../jdoop-examples/commons-net/src/main/java --generate-report

A code coverage report will be generated and can be found in the jacoco-site/ directory. JDoop will generate two formats of the report - HTML (to be found in jacoco/site/html/index.html) and XML (to be found in jacoco-site/report.xml).

For further information on how to run JDoop, you can execute:

python jdoop.py --help

The user should make sure that files generated by previous executions of JDoop are cleaned up before running JDoop again. In particular, the following files and directories in JDoop's root directory should be removed:

  • tests-round-*
  • build/
  • concrete-values*
  • classlist.txt
  • jacoco-site/
  • jdart-regular-executions.txt
  • randooped*

There is a bash script in the repository that removes these files and directories: clean.sh.

Command line parameters

JDoop has several command line parameters:

  • --root - a required parameter with a directory where source files of the tested project are.
  • --classlist - an optional parameter (with the default value classlist.txt) where the list of classes from the project will be written to.
  • --timelimit- an optional parameter (with the default value 120) with a time limit for JDoop, in seconds. If --generate-report is provided too, after the time limit is reached, JDoop will compile generated JUnit tests and generate a code coverage report. In other words, compilation and report generation execution times are not included in the time limit.
  • --configuration-file - an optional parameter (with the default value jdoop.ini) with a name of a configuration file in the INI file format. More about options within the configuration file are given in section Configuration file.
  • --randoop-only - an optional parameter (with the default value false) that specifies if only Randoop should be executed.
  • --baseline - an optional parameter (with the default value false) that specifies if only baseline JDoop should be executed. For more information on the baseline solution, see an extended abstract on JDoop.
  • --generate-report - an optional parameter (with the default value false) that specifies if a code coverage report should be generated once JDoop is done with its execution. If the parameter is provided, JaCoCo will be executed to generate a code coverage report for JUnit tests that JDoop generated. If this option is not provided, the user can generate the code coverage report herself, as described in section Generating code coverage reports.

For each of the following options, the option has to be set either on the command line or in the configuration file via its equivalent. If set on the command line, it overrides the value specified in the configuration file.

  • --jpf-core-path - a path to JPF core
  • --jdart-path - a path to the JDart module
  • --sut-compilation - a directory where class files of the project being tested can be found
  • --test-compilation - a directory where generated JUnit tests should be compiled to
  • --junit-path - a path to the JUnit jar archive
  • --hamcrest-path - a path to the Hamcrest core jar archive
  • --randoop-path - a path to the Randoop jar archive
  • --jacoco-path - a path to the JaCoCo jar archive

Generating code coverage reports

JDoop has a script that generates a code coverage report for JUnit tests that can be used without JDoop, i.e. unit tests can be generated or obtained in some other way. The script is report.py, and it has a few dependencies. First of all, clone this repository. In addition, the following is needed:

To get help on how to run the code coverage script from the command line, type:

python report.py --help

The script takes 5 arguments, where the --jacocopath argument is optional. There is an example package named branching in the report-examples/ directory. If you build the example in such a way that .class files are in the same directory where respective .java files are, this is how you would generate a code coverage report for the example:

python report.py --unittests TestBranching --classpath report-examples/:report-examples/branching/tests/ --sourcepath report-examples/ --buildpath report-examples/

The report.py script will generate a code coverage report in two formats - HTML and XML. Both can be found in the jacoco-site/ directory.

Emulab

To thoroughly evaluate JDoop, we have been using Emulab, a network testbed developed and provided by the Flux Research Group at the University of Utah.

Copyright

Copyright 2017 Marko Dimjašević

This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.

This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU General Public License for more details.

You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with this program. If not, see http://www.gnu.org/licenses/.

JDoop dependencies, including those in the lib/ directory, are free software as well, each licensed under its own terms. Follow links to respective web pages listed in the Dependencies section to find out more.