single header unit testing framework for C and C++
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utest.h

README.md

utest.h

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A simple one header solution to unit testing for C/C++.

Usage

Just #include "utest.h" in your code!

The current supported compilers are gcc, clang and msvc.

The current supported platforms are Linux, Mac OSX and Windows.

Command Line Options

utest.h supports some command line options:

  • --help to output the help message
  • --filter=<filter> will filter the test cases to run (useful for re-running one particular offending test case).
  • --output=<output> will output an xunit XML file with the test results (that Jenkins, travis-ci, and appveyor can parse for the test results).

Design

UTest is a single header library to enable all the fun of unit testing in C and C++. The library has been designed to provide an output similar to Google's googletest framework:

[==========] Running 1 test cases.
[ RUN      ] foo.bar
[       OK ] foo.bar (631ns)
[==========] 1 test cases ran.
[  PASSED  ] 1 tests.

UTEST_MAIN

In one C or C++ file, you must call the macro UTEST_MAIN:

UTEST_MAIN();

This will call into utest.h, instantiate all the testcases and run the unit test framework.

Alternatively, if you want to write your own main and call into utest.h, you can instead, in one C or C++ file call:

UTEST_STATE();

And then when you are ready to call into the utest.h framework do:

int main(int argc, const char *const argv[]) {
  // do your own thing
  return utest_main(argc, argv);
}

Define a Testcase

To define a test case to run, you can do the following;

#include "utest.h"

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  ASSERT_TRUE(1);
}

The UTEST macro takes two parameters - the first being the set that the test case belongs to, the second being the name of the test. This allows tests to be grouped for convenience.

Define a Fixtured Testcase

A fixtured testcase is one in which there is a struct that is instantiated that can be shared across multiple testcases.

struct MyTestFixture {
  char c;
  int i;
  float f;
};

UTEST_F_SETUP(MyTestFixture) {
  utest_fixture->c = 'a';
  utest_fixture->i = 42;
  utest_fixture->f = 3.14f;

  // we can even assert and expect in setup!
  ASSERT_EQ(42, utest_fixture->i);
  EXPECT_TRUE(true);
}

UTEST_F_TEARDOWN(MyTestFixture) {
  // and also assert and expect in teardown!
  ASSERT_EQ(13, utest_fixture->i);
}

UTEST_F(MyTestFixture, a) {
  utest_fixture->i = 13;
  // teardown will succeed because i is 13...
}

UTEST_F(MyTestFixture, b) {
  utest_fixture->i = 83;
  // teardown will fail because i is not 13!
}

Some things to note that were demonstrated above:

  • We have this new implicit variable within our macros - utest_fixture. This is a pointer to the struct you decided as your fixture (so MyTestFixture in the above code).
  • Instead of specifying a testcase set (like we do with the UTEST macro), we instead specify the name of the fixture struct we are using.
  • Every fixture has to have a UTEST_F_SETUP and UTEST_F_TEARDOWN macro - even if they do nothing in the body.
  • Multiple testcases (UTEST_F's) can use the same fixture.
  • You can use EXPECT_* and ASSERT_* macros within the body of both the fixture's setup and teardown macros.

Define an Indexed Testcase

Sometimes you want to use the same fixture and testcase repeatedly, but perhaps subtly change one variable within. This is where indexed testcases come in.

struct MyTestIndexedFixture{
  bool x;
  bool y;
};

UTEST_I_SETUP(MyTestIndexedFixture) {
  if (utest_index < 30) {
    utest_fixture->x = utest_index & 1;
    utest_fixture->y = (utest_index + 1) & 1;
  }
}

UTEST_I_TEARDOWN(MyTestIndexedFixture) {
  EXPECT_LE(0, utest_index);
}

UTEST_I(MyTestIndexedFixture, a, 2) {
  ASSERT_TRUE(utest_fixture->x | utest_fixture->y);
}

UTEST_I(MyTestIndexedFixture, b, 42) {
  // this will fail when the index is >= 30
  ASSERT_TRUE(utest_fixture->x | utest_fixture->y);
}

Note:

  • We use UTEST_I_* as the prefix for the setup and teardown functions now.
  • We use UTEST_I to declare the testcases.
  • We have access to a new variable utest_index in our setup and teardown functions, that we can use to slightly vary our fixture.
  • We provide a number as the third parameter of the UTEST_I macro - this is the number of times we should run the test case for that index. It must be a literal.

Testing Macros

Matching what googletest has, we provide two variants of each of the error checking conditions - ASSERTs and EXPECTs. If an ASSERT fails, the test case will cease execution, and utest.h will continue with the next test case to be run. If an EXPECT fails, the remainder of the test case will still be executed, allowing for further checks to be carried out.

We currently provide the following macros to be used within UTESTs:

ASSERT_TRUE(x)

Asserts that x evaluates to true (EG. non-zero).

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int i = 1;
  ASSERT_TRUE(i);  // pass!
  ASSERT_TRUE(42); // pass!
  ASSERT_TRUE(0);  // fail!
}

ASSERT_FALSE(x)

Asserts that x evaluates to false (EG. zero).

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int i = 0;
  ASSERT_FALSE(i); // pass!
  ASSERT_FALSE(1); // fail!
}

ASSERT_EQ(x, y)

Asserts that x and y are equal.

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int a = 42;
  int b = 42;
  ASSERT_EQ(a, b);     // pass!
  ASSERT_EQ(a, 42);    // pass!
  ASSERT_EQ(42, b);    // pass!
  ASSERT_EQ(42, 42);   // pass!
  ASSERT_EQ(a, b + 1); // fail!
}

ASSERT_NE(x, y)

Asserts that x and y are not equal.

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int a = 42;
  int b = 13;
  ASSERT_NE(a, b);   // pass!
  ASSERT_NE(a, 27);  // pass!
  ASSERT_NE(69, b);  // pass!
  ASSERT_NE(42, 13); // pass!
  ASSERT_NE(a, 42);  // fail!
}

ASSERT_LT(x, y)

Asserts that x is less than y.

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int a = 13;
  int b = 42;
  ASSERT_LT(a, b);   // pass!
  ASSERT_LT(a, 27);  // pass!
  ASSERT_LT(27, b);  // pass!
  ASSERT_LT(13, 42); // pass!
  ASSERT_LT(b, a);   // fail!
}

ASSERT_LE(x, y)

Asserts that x is less than or equal to y.

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int a = 13;
  int b = 42;
  ASSERT_LE(a, b);   // pass!
  ASSERT_LE(a, 27);  // pass!
  ASSERT_LE(a, 13);  // pass!
  ASSERT_LE(27, b);  // pass!
  ASSERT_LE(42, b);  // pass!
  ASSERT_LE(13, 13); // pass!
  ASSERT_LE(13, 42); // pass!
  ASSERT_LE(b, a);   // fail!
}

ASSERT_GT(x, y)

Asserts that x is greater than y.

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int a = 42;
  int b = 13;
  ASSERT_GT(a, b);   // pass!
  ASSERT_GT(a, 27);  // pass!
  ASSERT_GT(27, b);  // pass!
  ASSERT_GT(42, 13); // pass!
  ASSERT_GT(b, a);   // fail!
}

ASSERT_GE(x, y)

Asserts that x is greater than or equal to y.

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int a = 42;
  int b = 13;
  ASSERT_GE(a, b);   // pass!
  ASSERT_GE(a, 27);  // pass!
  ASSERT_GE(a, 13);  // pass!
  ASSERT_GE(27, b);  // pass!
  ASSERT_GE(42, b);  // pass!
  ASSERT_GE(13, 13); // pass!
  ASSERT_GE(42, 13); // pass!
  ASSERT_GE(b, a);   // fail!
}

EXPECT_TRUE(x)

Expects that x evaluates to true (i.e. non-zero).

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int i = 1;
  EXPECT_TRUE(i);  // pass!
  EXPECT_TRUE(42); // pass!
  EXPECT_TRUE(0);  // fail!
}

EXPECT_FALSE(x)

Expects that x evaluates to false (i.e. zero).

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int i = 0;
  EXPECT_FALSE(i); // pass!
  EXPECT_FALSE(1); // fail!
}

EXPECT_EQ(x, y)

Expects that x and y are equal.

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int a = 42;
  int b = 42;
  EXPECT_EQ(a, b);     // pass!
  EXPECT_EQ(a, 42);    // pass!
  EXPECT_EQ(42, b);    // pass!
  EXPECT_EQ(42, 42);   // pass!
  EXPECT_EQ(a, b + 1); // fail!
}

EXPECT_NE(x, y)

Expects that x and y are not equal.

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int a = 42;
  int b = 13;
  EXPECT_NE(a, b);   // pass!
  EXPECT_NE(a, 27);  // pass!
  EXPECT_NE(69, b);  // pass!
  EXPECT_NE(42, 13); // pass!
  EXPECT_NE(a, 42);  // fail!
}

EXPECT_LT(x, y)

Expects that x is less than y.

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int a = 13;
  int b = 42;
  EXPECT_LT(a, b);   // pass!
  EXPECT_LT(a, 27);  // pass!
  EXPECT_LT(27, b);  // pass!
  EXPECT_LT(13, 42); // pass!
  EXPECT_LT(b, a);   // fail!
}

EXPECT_LE(x, y)

Expects that x is less than or equal to y.

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int a = 13;
  int b = 42;
  EXPECT_LE(a, b);   // pass!
  EXPECT_LE(a, 27);  // pass!
  EXPECT_LE(a, 13);  // pass!
  EXPECT_LE(27, b);  // pass!
  EXPECT_LE(42, b);  // pass!
  EXPECT_LE(13, 13); // pass!
  EXPECT_LE(13, 42); // pass!
  EXPECT_LE(b, a);   // fail!
}

EXPECT_GT(x, y)

Expects that x is greater than y.

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int a = 42;
  int b = 13;
  EXPECT_GT(a, b);   // pass!
  EXPECT_GT(a, 27);  // pass!
  EXPECT_GT(27, b);  // pass!
  EXPECT_GT(42, 13); // pass!
  EXPECT_GT(b, a);   // fail!
}

EXPECT_GT(x, y)

Expects that x is greater than or equal to y.

UTEST(foo, bar) {
  int a = 42;
  int b = 13;
  EXPECT_GE(a, b);   // pass!
  EXPECT_GE(a, 27);  // pass!
  EXPECT_GE(a, 13);  // pass!
  EXPECT_GE(27, b);  // pass!
  EXPECT_GE(42, b);  // pass!
  EXPECT_GE(13, 13); // pass!
  EXPECT_GE(42, 13); // pass!
  EXPECT_GE(b, a);   // fail!
}

License

This is free and unencumbered software released into the public domain.

Anyone is free to copy, modify, publish, use, compile, sell, or distribute this software, either in source code form or as a compiled binary, for any purpose, commercial or non-commercial, and by any means.

In jurisdictions that recognize copyright laws, the author or authors of this software dedicate any and all copyright interest in the software to the public domain. We make this dedication for the benefit of the public at large and to the detriment of our heirs and successors. We intend this dedication to be an overt act of relinquishment in perpetuity of all present and future rights to this software under copyright law.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

For more information, please refer to http://unlicense.org/