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Bugfix/issue#3105 selector max id nested at statements #3113

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merged 9 commits into from Feb 9, 2018

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@BenjaminWFox
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BenjaminWFox commented Jan 8, 2018

Which issue, if any, is this issue related to?

#3105

Is there anything in the PR that needs further explanation?

I haven't done a lot of these (edits/PRs) so I'm not sure if I missed something, but I couldn't find a scenario in the tests where the the check for 'atrule' was useful. Everything seemed to work as I expected when I removed it.

@hudochenkov

Few minor organizational moments.

Could you rebase your branch on master, please? We found that some tests for selector-max-id weren't running and your fix might affect these tests because now they are running.

{
code: ".foo { @if ($p == 1) { #bar #baz {} } }",
description: "@if statement: nested compound selector"
},

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@hudochenkov

hudochenkov Jan 11, 2018

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I think tests containing @if should go to test function with syntax: "scss".

message: messages.expected(".foo #bar #baz #foo", 2),
line: 1,
column: 24
},

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@hudochenkov

hudochenkov Jan 11, 2018

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I think tests containing @if should go to test function with syntax: "scss".

@Arcanemagus

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Arcanemagus commented Jan 11, 2018

@BenjaminWFox You should either merge changes from master into this branch, or rebase the branch on the new changes. Cherry picking the commits from master into here just causes confusion in the log when this is merged unless all of these commits are squashed together.

@BenjaminWFox

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BenjaminWFox commented Jan 11, 2018

@Arcanemagus Hmm, I thought I rebased but I haven't dealt with upstream/forked repos before - I probably got confused trying to get the right updates from the right place.

Should I just squash them then? And would that be with something like git rebase -i <after-specific-commit>? Thanks.

@Arcanemagus

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Arcanemagus commented Jan 11, 2018

Actually as @hudochenkov just pointed out to me in a different PR, all PR's here are squashed so it's not a huge issue.

For your own reference though:

The simplest method is to make sure your local master matches the upstream master, then run git rebase master. That makes your commit(s) move to having the current master as their parent commit.

Alternatively you can also do git merge master, which creates a separate commit that merges the current state of master into your branch, leaving your existing commits untouched.

Requested changes were made in 803c2f0

@ntwb

ntwb approved these changes Jan 20, 2018

LGTM 👍

• Tests pass locally for me
• Squashing merge should work 🤞

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