dir for humans. A library for Python 2 and 3.
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Latest commit 6d3671f Aug 5, 2016 @araile Remove download counter


see: dir for humans

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see is an alternative to the built-in dir function in Python. It shows you what you can do with things.

Supports Python 2.6+ and 3.2+. Also works in iPython and PyPy.

BSD (see the LICENSE file)

Contributions are welcome. See the CHANGELOG.rst and AUTHORS.rst files.


To install see, run:

$ pip install --upgrade see


see is designed for the interactive Python interpreter. Import the see function like so:

>>> from see import see

Call see() without arguments to see all objects in the global scope.

>>> foo = 'bar'
>>> see()
    foo      see()

Call see(an_object) to see what you can do with an_object.

>>> number = 1
>>> see(number)
    +                -                *                /                //
    %                **               <<               >>               &
    ^                |                +obj             -obj             ~
    <                <=               ==               !=               >
    >=               abs()            bool()           dir()
    divmod()         float()          hash()           help()
    hex()            int()            oct()            repr()
    round()          str()            .bit_length()    .conjugate()
    .denominator     .from_bytes()    .imag            .numerator
    .real            .to_bytes()


You can use a Python startup file to ensure that see is available every time you run Python. The following example uses a startup file named .pythonrc.py in the user's home directory:

  1. Create the Python startup file, if it does not already exist:

    $ touch ~/.pythonrc.py
  2. Open this file in your preferred editor. Add the following line:

    from see import see
  3. Set the following environment variable (e.g. in ~/.bashrc for Bash):

    $ export PYTHONSTARTUP="$HOME/.pythonrc.py"

Now you can use see immediately after running python, without having to manually import it.