the versatile javascript framework
Latest commit 80c85ab Nov 6, 2018

README.md

henri - the versatile javascript framework

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henri is an easy to learn rails-like, server-side rendered (react & vue) with powerful ORMs

How to use

Install

  yarn global add henri

  # or

  npm install -g henri

Create a new project

  henri new <folder name>

The above command will create a directory structure similar to this:

├── app
│   ├── controllers
│   ├── helpers
│   ├── models
│   └── views
│       ├── assets
│       ├── components
│       ├── pages
│       ├── public
│       │   ├── css
│       │   ├── fonts
│       │   ├── img
│       │   ├── js
│       │   └── patterns
│       └── styles
├── config
│   ├── default.json
│   ├── production.json
│   ├── routes.js
│   └── webpack.js            <- Overload Next.js webpack settings
├── test
│   ├── controllers
│   ├── helpers
│   ├── models
│   └── views
├── package.json

If you have a Ruby on Rails background, this might look familiar.

One last step to start coding is:

  cd <folder name>
  henri server

And you're good to go!

Configuration

The configuration is a json file located in the config directory.

henri will try to load the file matching your NODE_ENV and will fallback to default.

You can have a default.json, production.json, etc.

{
  "stores": {
    "default": {
      "adapter": "mongoose",
      "url": "mongodb://user:pass@mongoserver.com:10914/henri-test"
    },
    "dev": {
      "adapter": "disk"
    }
  },
  "secret": "25bb9ed0b0c44cc3549f1a09fc082a1aa3ec91fbd4ce9a090b",
  "renderer": "react"
}

Models

You can easily add models under app/models.

They will be autoloaded and available throughout your application (exposed globally).

We use Mongoose for MongoDB, Sequelize for SQL adapters and Waterline for the disk adapter.

// app/models/User.js

// Whenever you have a User model, it will be overloaded with the following:

// email: string
// password: string
// beforeCreate: encrypts the password
// beforeUpdate: encrypts the password

module.exports = {
  store: 'dev', // see the demo configuration up there
  schema: {
    firstName: { type: 'string' },
    lastName: String,
    tasks: {},
  },
};
// app/models/Tasks.js

module.exports = {
  store: 'default', // see the demo configuration up there
  schema: {
    name: { type: 'string', required: true },
    category: {
      type: 'string',
      validations: {
        isIn: ['urgent', 'high', 'medium', 'low'],
      },
      defaultsTo: 'low',
    },
  },
};

Disk

The disk adapter is using Waterline to provide disk-based storage.

This is not for production and you can easily port your models to other adapters.

  yarn add @usehenri/disk

  # or

  npm install @usehenri/disk --save

MongoDB

The MongoDB adapter is using Mongoose to provide a MongoDB ODM.

  yarn add @usehenri/mongoose

  # or

  npm install @usehenri/mongoose --save

MySQL

The MySQL adapter is using Sequelize to provide a MySQL ORM.

  yarn add @usehenri/mysql

  # or

  npm install @usehenri/mysql --save

MSSQL

The MSSQL adapter is using Sequelize to provide a MSSQL ORM.

  yarn add @usehenri/mssql

  # or

  npm install @usehenri/mssql --save

PostgreSQL

The PostgresQL adapter is also using Sequelize to provide a PostgresQL ORM.

  yarn add @usehenri/postgresql

  # or

  npm install @usehenri/postgresql --save

GraphQL

You can add a graphql key to your schema file and they will be automatically loaded, merged and available.

Definition

// app/models/Task.js

const types = require('@usehenri/mongoose/types');

module.exports = {
  schema: {
    description: { type: types.STRING, required: true },
    type: { type: types.ObjectId, ref: 'Type', required: true },
    location: { type: types.ObjectId, ref: 'Location', required: true },
    reference: { type: types.STRING, required: true },
    notes: { type: types.STRING },
    oos: { type: types.BOOLEAN, default: false },
  },
  options: {
    timestamps: true,
  },
  graphql: {
    types: `
      type Task {
        _id: ID!
        reference: String!
        description: String!
        location: Location
        type: Type
        notes: String!
        oos: Boolean
      }
      type Query {
        tasks: [Task]
        task(_id: ID!): Task
      }
    `,
    resolvers: {
      Query: {
        tasks: async () => {
          return Task.find()
            .populate('type location')
            .exec();
        },
        task: async (_, id) => await Task.findOne(id).populate('type'),
      },
    },
  },
};

Query

You will be able to query this anywhere. Even as an argument to res.render(). See below:

// app/controllers/tasks.js

// henri has a gql function which does nothing but help editors parse gql...!
const { gql } = henri;

module.exports = {
  index: async (req, res) => {
    return res.render('/tasks', {
      graphql: gql`
        {
          tasks {
            _id
            reference
            description
            type {
              _id
              name
              prefix
              counter
            }
            location {
              _id
              name
            }
          }
          locations {
            _id
            name
          }
        }
      `,
    });
  },
};

Views

You can use React, Vue and Handlebars as renderer. They are all server-side rendered and the first two options use webpack to push updates to the browser.

React

We use next.js to render pages and inject data from controllers. You can only add pages and if the defined routes don't match, and next matches a route, it will be rendered.

Usage (config file):

{
  "renderer": "react"
}

Example:

// app/views/pages/log.js

import React from 'react';
import Link from 'next/link';

export default data => (
  <div>
    <div>{data}</div>
    <Link href="/home">
      <a>Home</a>
    </Link>
  </div>
);

You can also add webpack configuration in config/webpack.js:

// If you want to have jQuery as a global...

module.exports = {
  webpack: async (config, { dev }, webpack) => {
    config.plugins.push(
      new webpack.ProvidePlugin({
        $: 'jquery',
        jQuery: 'jquery',
      })
    );
    return config;
  },
};

Inferno

You can use Inferno instead of React in production. In development, React will be used for hot re/loading.

Installation:

yarn add react react-dom inferno inferno-compat inferno-server

Usage (config file):

{
  "renderer": "inferno"
}

Preact

You can use Preact instead of React in production. In development, React will be used for hot re/loading.

Installation:

yarn add react react-dom preact preact-compat

Usage (config file):

{
  "renderer": "preact"
}

Vue.js

We use Nuxt.js to render pages and inject data from controllers. You can only add pages and if the defined routes don't match, and nuxt matches a route, it will be rendered.

Usage (config file):

{
  "renderer": "vue"
}

Example:

<template>
  <div>
    <h1>Welcome!</h1>
    <nuxt-link to="/about">About page</nuxt-link>
  </div>
</template>

Handlebars

The handlebars options renders your .html or .hbs files under app/views/pages.

It will also load partials from app/views/partials

Usage (config file):

{
  "renderer": "template"
}

Example:

<html>

<head>
  <title>Hello!</title>
</head>

<body>
  {{> somePartials }}
  <li>Some data: {{hello}}</li>
</body>

</html>

Fetching data again

You can refetch data from any data-hydrated controller endpoint with GET using the application/json header.

Controllers

You can easily add controllers under app/controllers.

They will be autoloaded and available throughout your application.

Controllers are auto-reloaded on save.

// app/controllers/User.js

module.exports = {
  info: async (req, res) => {
    if (!req.isAuthenticated()) {
      return res.status(403).send("Sorry! You can't see that.");
    }
    const { user } = henri;
    if (await User.count({ email: 'felix@usehenri.io' })) {
      await User.update({ email: 'felix@usehenri.io' }, { password: 'blue' });
      return res.send('user exists.');
    }
    try {
      await user.compare('moo', pass);
      res.send('logged in!');
    } catch (error) {
      res.send('not good');
    }
  },
  create: (req, res) => {
    await User.create({ email: 'felix@usehenri.io', password: 'moo' });
  },
  fetch: async (req, res) => {
    const users = await User.find();
    res.send(users);
  },
  postinfo: async (req, res) => {
    let data = req.isAuthenticated() ? await User.find() : {};
    res.render('/log', data);
  }
};

Routes

Routes are defined in config/routes.js. Also, any pages in app/views/pages will be rendered if no routes match before.

Routes are a simple object with a key standing as a route or an action verb (used by express) and a route.

If you want to access the res.render data, you can make the call with application/json header. Everything else will be rendered.

// config/routes.js

module.exports = {
  '/test': 'user#info', // default to 'get /test'

  '/abc/:id': 'moo#iii', // as this controller does not exists, route won't be loaded

  '/user/find': 'user#fetch',

  'get /poo': 'user#postinfo',

  'post /poo': 'user#create',

  'get /secured': {
    controller: 'secureController#index',
    roles: ['admin'],
  },

  'resources todo': {
    controller: 'todo',
  },

  'crud categories': {
    scope: 'api',
    controller: 'categories',
    omit: ['destroy'], // DELETE route will not be loaded
  },
};

Roles

You can specify an array of roles which need to be matched to access the routes.

CRUD

The crud keyword (instead of http verbs) will create routes in a predefined way:

// 'crud happy': 'life'

GET /happy => life#index
POST /happy => life#create
PATCH /happy/:id => life#update
PUT /happy/:id => life#update
DELETE /happy/:id => life#destroy

Resources

The resources keyword (instead of http verbs) add views target to CRUD, ending up with:

// 'resources happy': 'life'

GET /happy => life#index
POST /happy => life#create
PATCH /happy/:id => life#update
PUT /happy/:id => life#update
DELETE /happy/:id => life#destroy

GET /happy/:id/edit => life#edit
GET /happy/new => life#new
GET /happy/:id => life#show

Scope

You can add scope to your routes to prefix them with anything you want.

Omit (crud & resources only)

You can add omit array to your routes to prevent this route to be created.

Mail

We use nodemailer to provide email capabilities.

When running tests, we use nodemailer's ethereal fake-mail service.

Config

{
  "mail": {
    // ...Same as nodemailer's config
  }
}

Send

We provide a wrapper around nodemailer.SendMail:

await henri.mail.send({
  from: '"Henri Server" <foo@example.com>', // sender address
  to: 'bar@example.com, baz@example.com', // list of receivers
  subject: 'Hello ✔', // Subject line
  text: 'Hello world?', // plain text body
  html: '<b>Hello world?</b>', // html body
});

If you are using the test accounts, you will see a link to your email in the console.

You can access nodemailer's package directly from henri.mail.nodemailer and transporter from henri.mail.transporter.

Workers

You can add files under app/workers and they will be auto-loaded, watched and reloaded.

If they export a start() and a stop() method, they will be call when initializing and tearing down (reload also).

Example:

let timer;

const start = h => {
  h.pen.info('worker started');
  timer = setInterval(
    () => h.pen.warn(`the argument is the henri object`),
    5000
  );
};

const stop = () => clearInterval(timer);

module.exports = { start, stop };

Under the hood

Vision

Bundle the best tools in a structured environment to provide a stable and fast-paced development experience.

Modules

We use a 8 levels boot system.

  1. All modules are scanned and put in a sequence with same-level modules

  2. We cycle from level 0 to 7, initializing all the same-level modules in a concurrent way

  3. If the module is reloadable, it will unwind and rewind in the same sequence on reloads

See the Contributing section for more information

Plans

  • Add helpers integration
  • Add documentation!
  • Build a website
  • Report bugs!

Contributing

  • Submit issues, pull requests, anything!

Thanks to the following and their contributors

Author

  • Félix-Antoine Paradis (@reel)