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Transpec

Transpec is a tool for converting your specs to the latest RSpec syntax with static and dynamic code analysis.

With Transpec you can upgrade your RSpec 2 specs to RSpec 3 in no time. It supports conversions for almost all of the RSpec 3 changes – not only the expect syntax. Also, you can use it on your RSpec 2 project even if you're not going to upgrade it to RSpec 3 for now.

Check out the following posts for the new RSpec syntax and the changes in RSpec 3:

If you are going to use Transpec in the upgrade process to RSpec 3, read the RSpec official guide:

Examples

Here's an example spec:

describe Account do
  subject(:account) { Account.new(logger) }
  let(:logger) { mock('logger') }

  describe '#balance' do
    context 'initially' do
      it 'is zero' do
        account.balance.should == 0
      end
    end
  end

  describe '#close' do
    it 'logs an account closed message' do
      logger.should_receive(:account_closed).with(account)
      account.close
    end
  end

  describe '#renew' do
    context 'when the account is not closed' do
      before do
        account.stub(:closed?).and_return(false)
      end

      it 'does not raise error' do
        lambda { account.renew }.should_not raise_error(Account::RenewalError)
      end
    end
  end
end

Transpec would convert it to the following form:

describe Account do
  subject(:account) { Account.new(logger) }
  let(:logger) { double('logger') }

  describe '#balance' do
    context 'initially' do
      it 'is zero' do
        expect(account.balance).to eq(0)
      end
    end
  end

  describe '#close' do
    it 'logs an account closed message' do
      expect(logger).to receive(:account_closed).with(account)
      account.close
    end
  end

  describe '#renew' do
    context 'when the account is not closed' do
      before do
        allow(account).to receive(:closed?).and_return(false)
      end

      it 'does not raise error' do
        expect { account.renew }.not_to raise_error
      end
    end
  end
end

Actual examples

You can see actual conversion examples below:

Installation

Simply install transpec with gem command:

$ gem install transpec

Normally you don't need to add transpec to your Gemfile or *.gemspec since this isn't a tool to be used daily.

Basic Usage

Before converting your specs:

  • Make sure your project has rspec gem dependency 2.14 or later. If not, change your Gemfile or *.gemspec to do so.
  • Run rspec and check if all the specs pass.
  • Ensure the Git repository is clean. (You don't want to mix up your changes and Transpec's changes, do you?)

Then, run transpec in the project root directory:

$ cd some-project
$ transpec

This will run the specs, convert them, and overwrite all spec files in the spec directory.

After the conversion, run rspec again and check whether everything is still green:

$ bundle exec rspec

If it's green, commit the changes with an auto-generated message that describes the conversion summary and helps your team members to understand the new syntax:

$ git commit -aeF .git/COMMIT_EDITMSG

And you are done!

Advanced Usage

Convert only specific files

You can pass transpec arbitrary paths to convert:

# You always need to be in the project root directory
$ cd some-project

# Convert only files in `features` directory
$ transpec features

# Convert only files in `spec/foo` and `spec/bar` directory
$ transpec spec/foo spec/bar

# Convert only `spec/baz_spec.rb`
$ transpec spec/baz_spec.rb

Note that the current working directory always needs to be the project root directory, so that Transpec can know where the root is.

Enable/disable specific conversions

You can disable specific conversions that are enabled by default with -k/--keep option, and enable conversions that are disabled by default with the -v/--convert option.

If you are willing to try the latest and modern syntax, run the following on RSpec 3:

$ transpec --convert example_group,hook_scope

See -k/--keep and -v/--convert for more details.

Options

Though Transpec ships with sensible defaults that essentially conform to the RSpec 3 defaults, you can customize the conversion behavior.

-f/--force

Force processing even if the current Git repository is not clean.

$ git status --short
 M spec/spec_helper.rb
$ transpec
The current Git repository is not clean. Aborting. If you want to proceed forcibly, use -f/--force option.
$ transpec --force
Copying project for dynamic analysis...
Running dynamic analysis with command "bundle exec rspec"...

-c/--rspec-command

Specify a command to run your specs which is used for dynamic analysis.

Transpec needs to run your specs in a copied project directory for dynamic analysis. If your project requires some special setup or commands to run specs, use this option. bundle exec rspec is used by default.

Note that the command to run dynamic analysis does not affect to the files or specs to be converted. This means that even if you specify a command that only runs a subset of the files in your spec suite or a subset of the specs in a file, every spec will be converted. For this reason, it's recommended to provide a command that runs full spec suite to -c/--rspec-command. If you want to convert only a subset of the files in a spec suite, pass the paths to transpec. See Advanced Usage for more details.

You can change the temporary directory that the your project will be copied by specifying the TMPDIR environment variable.

$ transpec --rspec-command "./special_setup.sh && bundle exec rspec"

-k/--keep

Keep specific syntaxes by disabling conversions.

$ transpec --keep should_receive,stub

Conversions enabled by default

Note that some syntaxes are available only if your project's RSpec is specific version or later. If they are unavailable, conversions for such syntaxes will be disabled automatically.

Type Target Syntax Converted Syntax
should obj.should matcher expect(obj).to matcher
oneliner it { should ... } it { is_expected.to ... }
should_receive obj.should_receive(:message) expect(obj).to receive(:message)
stub obj.stub(:message) allow(obj).to receive(:message)
have_items expect(obj).to have(n).items expect(obj.size).to eq(n)
its its(:attr) { } describe '#attr' { subject { }; it { } }
pending pending 'is an example' { } skip 'is an example' { }
deprecated All other deprecated syntaxes Latest syntaxes

See Supported Conversions for more details.

-v/--convert

Enable specific conversions that are disabled by default.

$ transpec --convert example_group

Conversions disabled by default

Most of these target syntaxes are not deprecated in both RSpec 2 and 3, but the new syntaxes provide more modern and clear ways.

Type Target Syntax Converted Syntax
example_group describe 'something' { } RSpec.describe 'something' { }
hook_scope before(:all) { } before(:context) { }
stub_with_hash obj.stub(:message => value) allow(obj).to receive(:message).and_return(value)

Note: Specifying stub_with_hash enables conversion of obj.stub(:message => value) to allow(obj).to receive(:message).and_return(value) when allow(obj).to receive_messages(:message => value) is unavailable (prior to RSpec 3.0), and it will be converted to multiple statements if the hash includes multiple pairs. If your project's RSpec is 3.0 or later, it will be converted to receive_messages(:message => value) regardless of this option.

See Supported Conversions - Method stubs with a hash argument for more details.

-o/--convert-only

Convert specific syntaxes while keeping all other syntaxes.

This option would be useful when you want to convert a non-deprecated syntax while keeping another syntax that would be converted by default. (e.g. converting the hook scope aliases while keeping the one-liner should).

$ transpec --convert-only example_group,hook_scope

-s/--skip-dynamic-analysis

Skip dynamic analysis and convert with only static analysis. The use of this option is basically discouraged since it significantly decreases the overall conversion accuracy.

This would be useful only if your spec suite takes really long (like an hour) to run and you prefer a combination of the rough but fast conversion by Transpec and manual fixes after that.

-n/--negative-form

Specify a negative form of to which is used in the expect syntax. Either not_to or to_not. not_to is used by default.

$ transpec --negative-form to_not

-b/--boolean-matcher

Specify a boolean matcher type which be_true and be_false will be converted to. Any of truthy,falsey, truthy,falsy or true,false can be specified. truthy,falsey is used by default.

$ transpec --boolean-matcher true,false

See Supported Conversions - Boolean matchers for more details.

-e/--explicit-spec-type

Add explicit spec :type metadata to example groups in a project using rspec-rails.

See Supported Conversions - Implicit spec types in rspec-rails for more details.

-a/--no-yield-any-instance

Suppress yielding receiver instances to any_instance implementation blocks as the first block argument.

By default in RSpec 3, any_instance implementation blocks will be yielded the receiving instance as the first block argument, and by default Transpec converts specs by adding instance arguments to the blocks so that they conform to the behavior of RSpec 3. Specifying this option suppresses the conversion and keeps them compatible with RSpec 2. Note that this is not same as --keep deprecated since this configures yield_receiver_to_any_instance_implementation_blocks with RSpec.configure.

See Supported Conversions - any_instance implementation blocks for more details.

-p/--no-parens-matcher-arg

Suppress parenthesizing arguments of matchers when converting should with operator matcher to expect with non-operator matcher (the expect syntax does not directly support the operator matchers). Note that it will be parenthesized even if this option is specified when parentheses are necessary to keep the meaning of the expression.

describe 'original spec' do
  it 'is an example' do
    1.should == 1
    2.should > 1
    'string'.should =~ /^str/
    [1, 2, 3].should =~ [2, 1, 3]
    { key: value }.should == { key: value }
  end
end

describe 'converted spec' do
  it 'is an example' do
    expect(1).to eq(1)
    expect(2).to be > 1
    expect('string').to match(/^str/)
    expect([1, 2, 3]).to match_array([2, 1, 3])
    expect({ key: value }).to eq({ key: value })
  end
end

describe 'converted spec with -p/--no-parens-matcher-arg option' do
  it 'is an example' do
    expect(1).to eq 1
    expect(2).to be > 1
    expect('string').to match /^str/
    expect([1, 2, 3]).to match_array [2, 1, 3]
    # With non-operator method, the parentheses are always required
    # to prevent the hash from being interpreted as a block.
    expect({ key: value }).to eq({ key: value })
  end
end

Inconvertible Specs

You might see the following warning while conversion:

Cannot convert #should into #expect since #expect is not available in the context.
spec/awesome_spec.rb:4:      1.should == 1

This message would be shown with specs like:

describe '#should that cannot be converted to #expect' do
  class MyAwesomeTestRunner
    def run
      1.should == 1
    end
  end

  it 'is 1' do
    test_runner = MyAwesomeTestRunner.new
    test_runner.run
  end
end

Reason

  • should is defined on BasicObject class, so you can use should everywhere.
  • expect is defined on RSpec::Matchers module which is included by RSpec::Core::ExampleGroup class, so you can use expect only where self is an instance of RSpec::Core::ExampleGroup (i.e. in it blocks, :each hook blocks or included module methods) or other classes that explicitly include RSpec::Matchers.

With the above example, in the context of 1.should == 1, the self is an instance of MyAwesomeTestRunner. Transpec tracks contexts and skips conversion if the syntax cannot be converted in a case like this.

Solution

Include or extend any of the following module to make RSpec syntax available in the context:

  • RSpec::Matchers for expect(obj).to some_matcher
  • RSpec::Mocks::ExampleMethods for expect/allow(obj).to receive(:message)
  class MyAwesomeTestRunner
    include RSpec::Matchers

    def run
      1.should == 1
    end
  end

Then run transpec again.

Two Types of should

There are two types of should:

describe 'the monkey-patched should' do
  subject { [] }

  it 'is empty' do
    subject.should be_empty
    #       ^^^^^^ BasicObject#should in RSpec 2.11 or later,
    #                or Kernel#should prior to RSpec 2.11.
  end
end

describe 'the one-liner should' do
  subject { [] }

  it { should be_empty }
  #    ^^^^^^ RSpec::Core::ExampleGroup#should
end

The monkey-patched obj.should:

  • Is defined on BasicObject (or Kernel) and provided by rspec-expectations gem.
  • Is deprecated in RSpec 3.
  • Has the issue with delegate/proxy objects.
  • There's the alternative syntax expect(obj).to since RSpec 2.11.

The one-liner (implicit receiver) should:

  • Is defined on RSpec::Core::ExampleGroup and provided by rspec-core gem.
  • Is not deprecated in RSpec 3.
  • Does not have the issue with delegate/proxy objects.
  • There's the alternative syntax is_expected.to since RSpec 2.99.beta2.

Supported Conversions

Standard expectations

Targets:

obj.should matcher
obj.should_not matcher

Will be converted to:

expect(obj).to matcher
expect(obj).not_to matcher
expect(obj).to_not matcher # with `--negative-form to_not`

One-liner expectations

This conversion is available only if your project's RSpec is 2.99.0.beta2 or later.

Targets:

it { should matcher }
it { should_not matcher }

Will be converted to:

it { is_expected.to matcher }
it { is_expected.not_to matcher }
it { is_expected.to_not matcher } # with `--negative-form to_not`

is_expected.to is designed for the consistency with the expect syntax. However the one-liner should is still not deprecated in RSpec 3.0 and available even if the should syntax is disabled with RSpec.configure. So if you think is_expected.to is verbose, feel free to disable this conversion and continue using the one-liner should. See Two Types of should also.

Operator matchers

Targets:

1.should == 1
1.should < 2
Integer.should === 1
'string'.should =~ /^str/
[1, 2, 3].should =~ [2, 1, 3]

Will be converted to:

expect(1).to eq(1)
expect(1).to be < 2
expect(Integer).to be === 1
expect('string').to match(/^str/)
expect([1, 2, 3]).to match_array([2, 1, 3])

This conversion is combined with the conversion of standard expectations and cannot be disabled separately because the expect syntax does not directly support the operator matchers.

Boolean matchers

This conversion is available only if your project's RSpec is 2.99.0.beta1 or later.

Targets:

expect(obj).to be_true
expect(obj).to be_false

Will be converted to:

expect(obj).to be_truthy
expect(obj).to be_falsey

# With `--boolean-matcher truthy,falsy`
# be_falsy is just an alias of be_falsey.
expect(obj).to be_truthy
expect(obj).to be_falsy

# With `--boolean-matcher true,false`
expect(obj).to be true
expect(obj).to be false
  • be_true matcher passes if expectation subject is truthy in conditional semantics. (i.e. all objects except false and nil)
  • be_false matcher passes if expectation subject is falsey in conditional semantics. (i.e. false or nil)
  • be_truthy and be_falsey matchers are renamed version of be_true and be_false and their behaviors are same.
  • be true and be false are not new things. These are combinations of be matcher and boolean literals. These pass if expectation subject is exactly equal to boolean value.

So, converting be_true/be_false to be_truthy/be_falsey never breaks your specs and this is Transpec's default. If you are willing to test boolean values strictly, you can convert them to be true/be false with --boolean-matcher true,false option. Note that this may break your specs if your application code don't return exact boolean values.

be_close matcher

Targets:

expect(1.0 / 3.0).to be_close(0.333, 0.001)

Will be converted to:

expect(1.0 / 3.0).to be_within(0.001).of(0.333)

have(n).items matcher

This conversion will be disabled automatically if rspec-collection_matchers is loaded in your spec.

Targets:

expect(collection).to have(3).items
expect(collection).to have_exactly(3).items
expect(collection).to have_at_least(3).items
expect(collection).to have_at_most(3).items

collection.should have(3).items

# Assume `team` responds to #players.
expect(team).to have(3).players

# Assume #players is a private method.
expect(team).to have(3).players

# Validation expectations in rspec-rails.
expect(model).to have(2).errors_on(:name)

Will be converted to:

expect(collection.size).to eq(3)
expect(collection.size).to eq(3)
expect(collection.size).to be >= 3
expect(collection.size).to be <= 3

 # With `--keep should`
collection.size.should == 3

expect(team.players.size).to eq(3)

# have(n).items matcher invokes #players even if it's a private method.
expect(team.send(:players).size).to eq(3)

# Conversion of `have(n).errors_on(:attr)` is not supported.
expect(model).to have(2).errors_on(:name)

There's an option to continue using have(n).items matcher with rspec-collection_matchers which is a gem extracted from rspec-expectations. If you choose to do so, disable this conversion by either:

  • Specify --keep have_items option manually.
  • Require rspec-collection_matchers in your spec so that Transpec automatically disables this conversion.

Note about expect(model).to have(n).errors_on(:attr)

The idiom expect(model).to have(n).errors_on(:attr) in rspec-rails 2 consists of have(n).items matcher and a monkey-patch ActiveModel::Validations#errors_on. In RSpec 2 the monkey-patch was provided by rspec-rails, but in RSpec 3 it's extracted to rspec-collection_matchers along with have(n).items matcher. So if you convert it to expect(model.errors_on(:attr).size).to eq(2) without rspec-collection_matchers, it fails with error undefined method 'error_on' for #<Model ...>.

Technically it can be converted to:

model.valid?
expect(model.errors[:attr].size).to eq(n)

However currently Transpec doesn't support this conversion since this is probably not what most people want. So using rspec-collection_matchers gem is recommended for now.

One-liner expectations with have(n).items matcher

This conversion will be disabled automatically if rspec-collection_matchers is loaded in your spec.

Targets:

it { should have(3).items }
it { should have_at_least(3).players }

Will be converted to:

it 'has 3 items' do
  expect(subject.size).to eq(3)
end

# With `--keep should`
it 'has 3 items' do
  subject.size.should == 3
end

it 'has at least 3 players' do
  expect(subject.players.size).to be >= 3
end
  • This conversion can be disabled by: --keep have_items

Expectations on block

Targets:

lambda { do_something }.should raise_error
proc { do_something }.should raise_error
-> { do_something }.should raise_error
expect { do_something }.should raise_error

Will be converted to:

expect { do_something }.to raise_error

Expectations on attribute of subject with its

This conversion will be disabled automatically if rspec-its is loaded in your spec.

Targets:

describe 'example' do
  subject { { foo: 1, bar: 2 } }
  its(:size) { should == 2 }
  its([:foo]) { should == 1 }
  its('keys.first') { should == :foo }
end

Will be converted to:

describe 'example' do
  subject { { foo: 1, bar: 2 } }

  describe '#size' do
    subject { super().size }
    it { should == 2 }
  end

  describe '[:foo]' do
    subject { super()[:foo] }
    it { should == 1 }
  end

  describe '#keys' do
    subject { super().keys }
    describe '#first' do
      subject { super().first }
      it { should == :foo }
    end
  end
end

There's an option to continue using its with rspec-its which is a gem extracted from rspec-core. If you choose to do so, disable this conversion by either:

  • Specify --keep its option manually.
  • Require rspec-its in your spec so that Transpec automatically disables this conversion.

Note that this conversion is a sort of first-aid and ideally the expectations should be rewritten to be more expressive by yourself. Read this post for the rationale.

Negative error expectations with specific error

Targets:

expect { do_something }.not_to raise_error(SomeErrorClass)
expect { do_something }.not_to raise_error('message')
expect { do_something }.not_to raise_error(SomeErrorClass, 'message')
lambda { do_something }.should_not raise_error(SomeErrorClass)

Will be converted to:

expect { do_something }.not_to raise_error
lambda { do_something }.should_not raise_error # with `--keep should`

Message expectations

Targets:

obj.should_receive(:message)
Klass.any_instance.should_receive(:message)

Will be converted to:

expect(obj).to receive(:message)
expect_any_instance_of(Klass).to receive(:message)

Message expectations that are actually method stubs

Targets:

obj.should_receive(:message).any_number_of_times
obj.should_receive(:message).at_least(0)

Klass.any_instance.should_receive(:message).any_number_of_times
Klass.any_instance.should_receive(:message).at_least(0)

Will be converted to:

allow(obj).to receive(:message)
obj.stub(:message) # with `--keep stub`

allow_any_instance_of(Klass).to receive(:message)
Klass.any_instance.stub(:message) # with `--keep stub`

Method stubs

Targets:

obj.stub(:message)
obj.stub!(:message)

obj.stub_chain(:foo, :bar, :baz)

Klass.any_instance.stub(:message)

obj.unstub(:message)
obj.unstub!(:message)

Will be converted to:

allow(obj).to receive(:message)

# Conversion from `stub_chain` to `receive_message_chain` is available
# only if the target project's RSpec is 3.0.0.beta2 or later
allow(obj).to receive_message_chain(:foo, :bar, :baz)

allow_any_instance_of(Klass).to receive(:message)

allow(obj).to receive(:message).and_call_original

Method stubs with a hash argument

Targets:

obj.stub(:foo => 1, :bar => 2)

Will be converted to:

# If the target project's RSpec is 3.0.0.beta1 or later
allow(obj).to receive_messages(:foo => 1, :bar => 2)

# If the target project's RSpec is prior to 3.0.0.beta1
obj.stub(:foo => 1, :bar => 2) # No conversion

# If the target project's RSpec is prior to 3.0.0.beta1
# and `--convert stub-with-hash` is specified
allow(obj).to receive(:foo).and_return(1)
allow(obj).to receive(:bar).and_return(2)

allow(obj).to receive_messages(:foo => 1, :bar => 2) which is designed to be the replacement for obj.stub(:foo => 1, :bar => 2) is available from RSpec 3.0.

So, if you're going to use Transpec in the upgrade path to RSpec 3, you may need to follow these steps:

  1. Upgrade to RSpec 2.99
  2. Run transpec (at this time obj.stub(:message => value) won't be converted)
  3. Upgrade to RSpec 3.0
  4. Run transpec again to convert obj.stub(:message => value)

Or if you're going to stay RSpec 2.14 for now but want to convert all stub to allow statements, run transpec with --convert stub_with_hash option. Note that once the conversion is done, multiple statements cannot be merged into a receive_messages.

Method stub aliases

Targets:

obj.stub!(:message)
obj.unstub!(:message)

Will be converted to:

# With `--keep stub`
obj.stub(:message)
obj.unstub(:message)

Method stubs with deprecated specification of number of times

Targets:

obj.stub(:message).any_number_of_times
obj.stub(:message).at_least(0)

Will be converted to:

allow(obj).to receive(:message)
obj.stub(:message) # with `--keep stub`

Useless and_return

Targets:

expect(obj).to receive(:message).and_return { 1 }
allow(obj).to receive(:message).and_return { 1 }

expect(obj).to receive(:message).and_return
allow(obj).to receive(:message).and_return

Will be converted to:

expect(obj).to receive(:message) { 1 }
allow(obj).to receive(:message) { 1 }

expect(obj).to receive(:message)
allow(obj).to receive(:message)

any_instance implementation blocks

This conversion is available only if your project's RSpec is >= 2.99.0.beta1 and < 3.0.0.beta1.

Targets:

RSpec.configure do |rspec|
end

describe 'example' do
  it 'is any_instance implementation block' do
    expect_any_instance_of(Klass).to receive(:message) { |arg| puts arg }
    allow_any_instance_of(Klass).to receive(:message) { |arg| puts arg }
  end
end

Will be converted to:

RSpec.configure do |rspec|
  rspec.mock_with :rspec do |mocks|
    # In RSpec 3, `any_instance` implementation blocks will be yielded the receiving
    # instance as the first block argument to allow the implementation block to use
    # the state of the receiver.
    # In RSpec 2.99, to maintain compatibility with RSpec 3 you need to either set
    # this config option to `false` OR set this to `true` and update your
    # `any_instance` implementation blocks to account for the first block argument
    # being the receiving instance.
    mocks.yield_receiver_to_any_instance_implementation_blocks = true
  end
end

describe 'example' do
  it 'is any_instance implementation block' do
    expect_any_instance_of(Klass).to receive(:message) { |instance, arg| puts arg }
    allow_any_instance_of(Klass).to receive(:message) { |instance, arg| puts arg }
  end
end

Or with --no-yield-any-instance option they will be converted to:

RSpec.configure do |rspec|
  rspec.mock_with :rspec do |mocks|
    # In RSpec 3, `any_instance` implementation blocks will be yielded the receiving
    # instance as the first block argument to allow the implementation block to use
    # the state of the receiver.
    # In RSpec 2.99, to maintain compatibility with RSpec 3 you need to either set
    # this config option to `false` OR set this to `true` and update your
    # `any_instance` implementation blocks to account for the first block argument
    # being the receiving instance.
    mocks.yield_receiver_to_any_instance_implementation_blocks = false
  end
end

describe 'example' do
  it 'is any_instance implementation block' do
    expect_any_instance_of(Klass).to receive(:message) { |arg| puts arg }
    allow_any_instance_of(Klass).to receive(:message) { |arg| puts arg }
  end
end

Test double aliases

Targets:

stub('something')
mock('something')

Will be converted to:

double('something')

Pending examples

This conversion is available only if your project's RSpec is >= 2.99.0.beta1 and < 3.0.0.beta1.

Targets:

describe 'example' do
  it 'is skipped', :pending => true do
    do_something_possibly_fail # This won't be run
  end

  pending 'is skipped' do
    do_something_possibly_fail # This won't be run
  end

  it 'is skipped' do
    pending
    do_something_possibly_fail # This won't be run
  end

  it 'is run and expected to fail' do
    pending do
      do_something_surely_fail # This will be run and expected to fail
    end
  end
end

Will be converted to:

describe 'example' do
  it 'is skipped', :skip => true do
    do_something_possibly_fail # This won't be run
  end

  skip 'is skipped' do
    do_something_possibly_fail # This won't be run
  end

  it 'is skipped' do
    skip
    do_something_possibly_fail # This won't be run
  end

  it 'is run and expected to fail' do
    pending # #pending with block is no longer supported
    do_something_surely_fail # This will be run and expected to fail
  end
end

Here's an excerpt from the warning for pending examples in RSpec 2.99:

The semantics of RSpec::Core::ExampleGroup#pending are changing in RSpec 3. In RSpec 2.x, it caused the example to be skipped. In RSpec 3, the example will still be run but is expected to fail, and will be marked as a failure (rather than as pending) if the example passes, just like how pending with a block from within an example already works.

To keep the same skip semantics, change pending to skip. Otherwise, if you want the new RSpec 3 behavior, you can safely ignore this warning and continue to upgrade to RSpec 3 without addressing it.

Current example object

This conversion is available only if your project's RSpec is 2.99.0.beta1 or later.

Targets:

module ScreenshotHelper
  def save_failure_screenshot
    return unless example.exception
    # ...
  end
end

describe 'example page' do
  include ScreenshotHelper
  after { save_failure_screenshot }
  let(:user) { User.find(example.metadata[:user_id]) }
  # ...
end

Will be converted to:

module ScreenshotHelper
  def save_failure_screenshot
    return unless RSpec.current_example.exception
    # ...
  end
end

describe 'example page' do
  include ScreenshotHelper
  after { save_failure_screenshot }
  let(:user) { |example| User.find(example.metadata[:user_id]) }
  # ...
end

Here's an excerpt from the warning for RSpec::Core::ExampleGroup#example and #running_example in RSpec 2.99:

RSpec::Core::ExampleGroup#example is deprecated and will be removed in RSpec 3. There are a few options for what you can use instead:

  • rspec-core's DSL methods (it, before, after, let, subject, etc) now yield the example as a block argument, and that is the recommended way to access the current example from those contexts.
  • The current example is now exposed via RSpec.current_example, which is accessible from any context.
  • If you can't update the code at this call site (e.g. because it is in an extension gem), you can use this snippet to continue making this method available in RSpec 2.99 and RSpec 3:
RSpec.configure do |c|
  c.expose_current_running_example_as :example
end

Custom matcher DSL

This conversion is available only if your project's RSpec is 3.0.0.beta2 or later.

Targets:

RSpec::Matchers.define :be_awesome do
  match_for_should { }
  match_for_should_not { }
  failure_message_for_should { }
  failure_message_for_should_not { }
end

Will be converted to:

RSpec::Matchers.define :be_awesome do
  match { }
  match_when_negated { }
  failure_message { }
  failure_message_when_negated { }
end

Implicit spec types in rspec-rails

This conversion is available only if rspec-rails is loaded in your spec and your project's RSpec is 2.99.0.rc1 or later.

Targets:

# In spec/models/some_model_spec.rb
RSpec.configure do |rspec|
end

describe SomeModel do
end

Will be converted to:

RSpec.configure do |rspec|
  # rspec-rails 3 will no longer automatically infer an example group's spec type
  # from the file location. You can explicitly opt-in to the feature using this
  # config option.
  # To explicitly tag specs without using automatic inference, set the `:type`
  # metadata manually:
  #
  #     describe ThingsController, :type => :controller do
  #       # Equivalent to being in spec/controllers
  #     end
  rspec.infer_spec_type_from_file_location!
end

describe SomeModel do
end

Or with --explicit-spec-type option they will be converted to:

RSpec.configure do |rspec|
end

describe SomeModel, :type => :model do
end

Deprecated configuration options

Targets:

RSpec.configure do |c|
  c.backtrace_clean_patterns
  c.backtrace_clean_patterns = [/lib\/something/]
  c.color_enabled = true

  c.out
  c.out = File.open('output.txt', 'w')
  c.output
  c.output = File.open('output.txt', 'w')

  c.backtrace_cleaner
  c.color?(output)
  c.filename_pattern
  c.filename_pattern = '**/*_test.rb'
  c.warnings
end

Will be converted to:

RSpec.configure do |c|
  c.backtrace_exclusion_patterns
  c.backtrace_exclusion_patterns = [/lib\/something/]
  c.color = true

  # RSpec 2.99.0.beta1 or later
  c.output_stream
  c.output_stream = File.open('output.txt', 'w')
  c.output_stream
  c.output_stream = File.open('output.txt', 'w')

  # RSpec 2.99.0.rc1 or later
  c.backtrace_formatter
  c.color_enabled?(output)
  c.pattern
  c.pattern = '**/*_test.rb'
  c.warnings?
end
  • This conversion can be disabled by: --keep deprecated

Monkey-patched example groups

This conversion is disabled by default and available only if your project's RSpec is 3.0.0.beta2 or later.

Targets:

RSpec.configure do |rspec|
end

describe 'top-level example group' do
  describe 'nested example group' do
  end
end

shared_examples 'shared examples' do
end

Will be converted to:

RSpec.configure do |rspec|
  # Setting this config option `false` removes rspec-core's monkey patching of the
  # top level methods like `describe`, `shared_examples_for` and `shared_context`
  # on `main` and `Module`. The methods are always available through the `RSpec`
  # module like `RSpec.describe` regardless of this setting.
  # For backwards compatibility this defaults to `true`.
  #
  # https://relishapp.com/rspec/rspec-core/v/3-0/docs/configuration/global-namespace-dsl
  rspec.expose_dsl_globally = false
end

RSpec.describe 'top-level example group' do
  describe 'nested example group' do
  end
end

RSpec.shared_examples 'shared examples' do
end

Hook scope aliases

This conversion is disabled by default and available only if your project's RSpec is 3.0.0.beta2 or later.

Targets:

describe 'example' do
  before { do_something }
  before(:each) { do_something }
  before(:all) { do_something }
end

RSpec.configure do |rspec|
  rspec.before(:suite) { do_something }
end

Will be converted to:

describe 'example' do
  before { do_something }
  before(:example) { do_something }
  before(:context) { do_something }
end

RSpec.configure do |rspec|
  rspec.before(:suite) { do_something }
end

Compatibility

Transpec is tested on the following Ruby implementations:

  • MRI 1.9.3
  • MRI 2.0.0
  • MRI 2.1.10
  • MRI 2.2.6
  • MRI 2.3.3
  • MRI 2.4.0
  • JRuby in 1.9 mode
  • JRuby 9.1.7.0

License

Copyright (c) 2013–2017 Yuji Nakayama

See the LICENSE.txt for details.