Data used in the story 'Libraries lose a quarter of staff as hundreds close'
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README.md

Library cuts: closures, volunteer numbers and staff cuts

Image from @BBCEngland

This repository contains data used in the story 'Libraries lose a quarter of staff as hundreds close', collected through Freedom of Information requests to library authorities across the UK. This data was complemented by analysis of CIPFA reports.

The story was reported across the BBC, including the following articles online:

The reporting team was Peter Sherlock, Daniel Wainwright, Paul Bradshaw and Antia Geada.

Coverage

You can listen to Radio 4 Today's coverage here (at 0730), Nicky Campbell and Eleanor Oldroyd on 5 Live Breakfast and Jeremy Vine on Radio 2 here (at 1230). Lauren Smith has linked to a range of local radio coverage on her blog.

Image from @bbc5live

#libraries trended on Twitter throughout the morning. BBC Breakfast created this short video for social media showing some key figures. You can join in the discussion on their Facebook page

BBC Breakfast created this short video for social media showing some key figures and #libraries trended on Twitter throughout the morning.

By midday Chris Love had used our data to create a Tableau visualisation of volunteer numbers at each library

Other information

The House of Commons Library quoted the BBC research in its briefing paper on public libraries on April 15, 2016. This briefing, which we have uploaded to this repository, also includes data going back to 2005 and including a breakdown of different types of employees. Professional posts, for example, declined at a much faster rate (46% of positions going between 2010 and 2015) than other posts (25% over the same period).

Data