A simple PHP script for providing calendar feeds for your website in a variety of different formats including iCalendar, RSS, JSON and XML.
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PHPCalFeed

A simple PHP script for providing calendar feeds for your website in a variety of different formats including iCalendar, RSS, JSON and XML.

  1. Why
  2. Requirements
  3. User Guide
  4. Licence
  5. Credits

1 Why?

Do you run a website with an events page? Does your site provide any kind of data feed for those events? If not, you might want to consider adding one. This allows users to have your events appear directly on their calendar as you publish them, simplifying the process of discovering, making time for, and attending your event.

PHPCalFeed aims to make the addition of a calendar feed as easy as possible. It is the "swiss army knife" of calendar feed setup; simple to drop into your site and flexible enough to suit a wide variety of setups. You provide the event information in a single file, and the script serves it up to visitors in multiple different feed formats.

2 Requirements

Essential

  • Requires a webserver running PHP 5.3 or later
  • Requires write permission to its directory on the webserver

Optional

  • PHP's JSON module is required for JSON input and output
  • PHP's XML DOM module is required for XML and XHTML output
  • PHP must be configured to allow remote requests in order to use remote file input
  • PHP's OpenSSL module is required for remote requests over HTTPS

3 User Guide

3.1 Installation

To install the script, copy the following files to your webserver using your FTP client, SCP client or similar:

  • calendar.php (the PHP script)
  • calendar.xsd (schema definition for XML)
  • calendar-cal.css (stylesheet for HTML calendar)
  • calendar-sub.css (stylesheet for subscribe button)
  • calendar-sub.png (icon image for subscribe button)

3.2 Provide Event Info

The script can read event info from a CSV, JSON or ICalendar file. It can also extract event info from HTML. A CSV file is the simplest of these options. Events can be one-off occurrences or recurring events which repeat on a schedule.

See the following two sections for general information on how to set up your calendar's input file:

And see the following sections for how to prepare the input file in your chosen data format:

The following sections describe how to set up input from several commonly-used sources:

3.2.1 Local File

To have PHPCalFeed read from a file on your own server, create a file called calendar-master with the appropriate file extension (see following sections). Copy the file to your webserver into the same directory as the calendar.php script. Delete the calendar-config.php file and calendar.html file if they are present. Now visit your website's calendar by entering its URL into the browser. For example:

http://your-website.com/path-to-calendar/calendar.php

The script should detect the file, identify its format automatically, and populate your website's calendar.

3.2.2 Remote File

As an alternative to a file on your own server, PHPCalFeed can read from a file on a different server. This is useful if you wish to use another calendar feed as the input, such as a public Google calendar (see Google Calendar Input for more on this). Note that your URL should begin with the http:// or https:// protocol and not webcal://. In order to connect to a remote URL, the allow_url_fopen option must be enabled for your server's PHP installation. In addition, connecting to a secure https:// URL requires the OpenSSL extension to be enabled for your installation.

To use a remote file, create the file calendar-config.php in the script directory, if it doesn't already exist, and define the url property by copying the code from the section below into the file, and replacing the example URL. Make sure to copy the code exactly, with the same letter cases, punctuation, etc:


<?php
return array(
	'url' => 'http://example.com/some-calendar.csv'
);

If the URL has the appropriate file extension (see following sections) then the script will identify the file's format automatically. Otherwise, the format must be defined explicitly using the format property, as follows:


<?php
return array(
	'url' => 'http://example.com/some-calendar',
	'format'=>'csv-remote'
);

Now delete the calendar.html file if it already exists, and visit your website's calendar by entering its URL into the browser. For example:

http://your-website.com/path-to-calendar/calendar.php

Your website's calendar will be populated from the remote file.

3.2.3 CSV Input

CSV stands for Comma-Separated Values and is a simple text format compatible with most spreadsheet applications. To supply the event information in CSV format, use the .csv file extension - for example, calendar-master.csv. Your CSV file should contain columns as follows, in any order, each with a heading on the first row of the file:

  • name (required) - the title of the event
  • date (required) - either a one-off date in yyyy-mm-dd format, or the spec for a recurring event as described in the Event Recurrence Specification section below. For example, 2014-02-28 or weekly on thu.
  • time (optional) - the time of day at which the event starts, in the following 24 hour time format: hh:mm. For example, 21:30. Defaults to midnight.
  • duration (optional) - the length of time the event continues for, as a number of days, minutes and hours in the following format: [0d][0h][0m]. For example, 3h 30m. Defaults to 24 hours.
  • description (optional) - a description of the event
  • url (optional) - a link to more information about the event

Below is an example:

Name Date Time Description
Halloween Party 2013-10-31 20:30 Come and have a spooktacular time!
Cool Society monthly on 1st tue 18:00 Monthly meetup for cool people only

PHPCalFeed can read CSV data directly from a Microsoft Outlook export. For more information see Microsoft Outlook CSV Input

By default, the script will assume the data in your CSV file is separated by comma , characters. For other separators such as tab or semicolon, create the config file calendar-config.php if it doesn't already exist, and define the delimiting character with the "delimiter", as follows:


<?php
return array(
	'format' => 'csv-local',
	'delimiter' => "\t"      // a tab
);

3.2.4 JSON Input

JSON is a simple data format using nested "objects" with named "properties". Note that to use JSON input, the JSON and Multibyte String extensions must be enabled for your server's PHP installation.

To supply the event information in JSON format, use the file extension .json

  • for example, calendar-master.json. Your JSON file should contain a root object with the following properties:
  • name (optional) - the title of the calendar, as a string
  • description (optional) - a description of the calendar, as a string
  • url (optional) - a link back to the calendar or related website, as a string
  • events (optional)_ - an array of objects describing one-off events (see below)
  • recurring-events(optional) - an array of objects describing recurring events (see below)

Each one-off event in the events array should be an object with the following properties:

  • name (required) - the title of the event, as a string
  • date (required) - the date on which the event starts, as a string in the following format: yyyy-mm-dd.
  • time (optional) - the time of day at which the event starts, as a string in the following 24 hour time format: hh:mm. For example, 23:30. Defaults to midnight.
  • duration (optional) - the length of time the event continues for, as a string containing a number of days, hours and minutes as follows: [0d][0h][0m]. For example, 3h 30m. Defaults to 24 hours.
  • description (optional) - a description of the event, as a string
  • url (optional) a link to more information about the event, as a string

Each recurring event in the recurring-events array should be an object with the following properties:

  • name (required) - the title of the event, as a string
  • recurrence (required) - a string specifying how often the event occurs. For details of the format of this property see the Event Recurrence Specification section below.
  • time (optional) - the time of day at which the event starts, as a string in the following 24 hour time format: hh:mm. For example, 23:30. Defaults to midnight.
  • duration (optional) - the length of time the event continues for, as a string containing a number of days, hours and minutes as follows: [0d][0h][0m]. For example, 3h 30m. Defaults to 24 hours.
  • description (optional) - a description of the event, as a string
  • url (optional) a link to more information about the event as a string

Below is a complete example JSON file:

{
	"name": "Mark's Calendar",
	"events": [
		{
			"name": "Super Fun Party",
			"date": "2013-02-28",
			"time": "20:30",
			"duration": "4h 30m"
		},
		{
			"name": "How to be Awesome - A Lecture",
			"date": "2013-09-10",
			"description": "A talk about how to be more awesome.",
			"url": "http://example.com/awesome"
		}
	],
	"recurring-events": [
		{
			"name": "Ada Lovelace Day",
			"recurrence": "yearly on 256th day",
			"description": "Celebrating the world's first computer programmer"
		}
	]
}

3.2.5 ICalendar Input

ICalendar is an extensive calendar data format compatible with many applications. To use ICalendar format, use the file extension .ics - for example, calendar-master.ics.

Your ICalendar file should contain a VCALENDAR object with one or more VEVENT objects. A full description of the ICalendar format is beyond the scope of this document, but for more information please refer to the ICalendar RFC.

3.2.6 HTML Input

HTML is a document markup language used to deliver web pages to your internet browser. HTML content is more often concerned with the presentation of a page rather than delivering meaningful data in a machine-readable format. PHPCalFeed can, however, "scrape" event information from a page provided the relevant markup elements can be uniquely identified in the document. To use HTML format, use the file extension .htm or .html - for example, calendar-master.html. It is usually more useful to use a remote HTML file by its URL. See Remote File for more information.

By default, PHPCalFeed will look for event information embedded using the hCalendar microformat syntax. Microformats are a standard for encoding semantic information in HTML, whereby page elements are given particular CSS class attributes to denote their meaning. As a minimum, the element surrounding each set of event properties should be given the class vevent. Within each event element, the event's name should be given the class summary. Its start time should be given the class dtstart - PHPCalFeed will attempt to interpret the date and time description as best it can. If any of the page elements already has a class attribute, simply add the new class to the end of the attribute, separated by a space. Below is an example page with added hCalendar information:

<html>
	<head>
		<title>Upcoming Events</title>
	</head>
	<body>
		<p>Here is the list of upcoming events for our group!<p>
		<table>
			<tbody>
				<tr class="big-yellow-text">
					<th>Date</th>
					<th>Description</th>
				</tr>
				<tr class="big-yellow-text vevent">
					<td>
						<abbr class="dtstart" title="2013-09-30 19:00:00">
							30th September at 7pm
						</abbr>
					</td>
					<td class="summary">
						Talk: The Deeper Meaning of Lolcats
					</td>
				</tr>
				<tr class="big-yellow-text vevent">
					<td>
						<abbr class="dtstart" title="2013-10-28 18:30:00">
							28th October at 6:30pm
						</abbr>
					</td>
					<td class="summary">
						Magic show with Bozo the clown
					</td>
				</tr>
			</tbody>
		</table>
	</body>
</html>

The other supported properties are:

  • description
  • dtend
  • duration
  • url

You can specify alternative class names for PHPCalFeed to look for instead. To do this, add the html-markers property to your calendar-config.php file. The css class names are specified as an associative array. For example:


<?php
return array(
	'format' => 'html-local',
	'html-markers' => array(
		'cal-event-class' => 'calendar-event',
		'ev-name-class' => 'event-name',
		'ev-start-class' => 'event-time' 
	)
);

The full list of customisable class properties is as follows:

  • cal-name-class - the calendar title. Defaults to the page <title> contents.
  • cal-description-class - the calendar description. Defaults to the page's <meta> description contents.
  • cal-url-class - the calendar's URL. Defaults to the URL of the page.
  • cal-event-class - the element surrounding each set of event properties. Defaults to vevent.
  • ev-name-class - the event's name. Defaults to summary.
  • ev-description-class - the event's description. Defaults to description.
  • ev-url-class - the event's URL. Defaults to url.
  • ev-start-class - the event's start date/time. Defaults to dtstart.
  • ev-end-class - the event's end date/time. Defaults to dtend.
  • ev-duration-class - the event's duration. Defaults to duration.

As a more advanced yet more flexible alternative to class names, you can specify an XPath expression for each element. XPath is a powerful and precise expression language for describing the location of content in an HTML or XML document. A good XPath primer can be found at W3Schools, or for a detailed explanation check out the W3C's XPath spec. Below is an example of specifying the event elements using XPath expressions:


<?php
return array(
	'format' => 'html-local',
	'html-markers' => array(
	
		// items within the list with id 'events'
		'cal-event-xpath' => "//ul[@id='events']/li",
		
		// the 'span' element with class 'evname' within the event element
		'ev-name-class' => "span[@class='evname']",
		
		// the second 'strong' element within the span with class 'evtime', 
		// within the event element
		'ev-start-class' => "span[@class='evtime']/strong[2]" 
	)
);

The full list of customisable XPath properties is as follows:

  • cal-name-xpath - the calendar title. Expression is relative to the document root. Defaults to the page <title> contents.
  • cal-description-xpath - the calendar description. Expression is relative to the document root. Defaults to the page's <meta> description contents.
  • cal-url-xpath - the calendar's URL. Expression is relative to the document root. Defaults to the URL of the page.
  • ev-name-xpath - the events name. Expression is relative to the event element. Defaults to element withsummary` class.
  • ev-description-xpath - the event's description. Expression is relative to the event element. Defaults to element with description class.
  • ev-url-xpath - the event's url. Expression is relative to the event element. Defaults to element with url class.
  • ev-start-xpath - the event's start date/time. Expression is relative to the event element. Defaults to element with dtstart class.
  • ev-end-xpath - the event's end date/time. Expression is relative to the event element. Defaults to element with dtend class.
  • ev-duration-xpath - the event's duration. Expression is relative to the event element. Defaults to element with duration class.

You can, of course, use a mix of class names and XPath expressions to specify the desired HTML elements.

3.2.7 Google Calendar Input

PHPCalFeed can read event information directly from a public Google calendar, using remote ICalendar input. First you will need to obtain your calendar's URL. To do this:

  1. Go to http://www.google.com/calendar and log in to Google Calendar
  2. Click on the gear icon near the top right and choose "Settings"
  3. Click on the "Calendars" tab just under the page heading
  4. Click on the name of the calendar you'd like to use
  5. Scroll down to the "Calendar Address" section
  6. Click on the green "ICAL" button
  7. Copy the URL from the popup dialog

Next, delete the calendar-config.php file in the calendar script's directory, if it already exists, and create a new one. Set the url property to your Google calendar url, by copying the code exactly as it appears in the section below and replacing the example url:


<?php
return array(
	'format' => 'icalendar-remote',
	'url' => 'http://your-calendar/url.ics'
);

See the Remote File and ICalendar Input sections for more information.

3.2.8 Yahoo Calendar Input

PHPCalFeed can read event information directly from a public Yahoo calendar, using remote ICalendar input. First you will need to obtain your calendar's URL. To do this:

  1. Go to http://calendar.yahoo.com and log in to Yahoo Calendar
  2. Click on the "Actions" link with the gear beside it, above the calendar grid
  3. Choose "Share..."
  4. Select the calendar you'd like to use and click "Continue"
  5. Copy the URL from the "Share with iCal Address" box

Next, delete the calendar-config.php file in the calendar script's directory, if it already exists, and create a new one. Set the url property to your Yahoo calendar url, by copying the code exactly as it appears in the section below and replacing the example url:


<?php
return array(
	'format' => 'icalendar-remote',
	'url' => 'http://your-calendar/url.ics'
);

3.2.9 Microsoft Outlook CSV Input

PHPCalFeed can read event data directly from a Microsft Outlook export file. To export your event data from Outlook, follow the instructions below. These instructions are for Outlook 2010, but the process will be similar for your version of Outlook.

  1. From the menu bar select "File" > "Open" > "Import"
  2. A wizard will appear. Choose "Export to a file" from the list and click "Next"
  3. Select "Comma Separated Values (Windows)" and click "Next"
  4. Select "Calendar" and click "Next"
  5. Click "Browse" and choose where to save the export file. Click "Next"
  6. Click "Map Custom Fields"
  7. Drag the following fields from the left box into the right box to select them:
    • Subject
    • Description
    • Start Date
    • Start Time
    • End Date
    • End Time
  8. Click "OK" and then "Finish"
  9. Enter the range of dates for which to export calendar events. Click "OK"
  10. Outlook will take a moment to export the data to the selected file
  11. Rename the exported file to calendar-master.csv if you have not done so already.

Next, delete the calendar-config.php file in the calendar script's directory, if it already exists. Copy the CSV file to the same directory as the calendar.php script on your server. Delete calendar.html and then visit the calendar script in your browser to clear the cache. Your exported events should be displayed.

3.2.10 Lanyrd Input

PHPCalFeed can read event data from a Lanyrd calendar feed. To use a Lanyrd event series as your calendar input, do the following:

  1. Visit the page for your event series. The URL will be in the form http://lanyrd.com/series/<username>/ where <username> is the name of your event.
  2. Scroll down to the "Stay Updated" section and click on the "Add to my calendar" link.
  3. Choose the "iCal" tab and copy the URL from the box.

Next, delete the calendar-config.php file in the calendar script's directory, if it already exists, and create a new one. Set the url property to your Lanyrd event series URL, by copying the code exactly as it appears in the section below and replacing the example url:


<?php
return array(
	'format' => 'icalendar-remote',
	'url' => 'http://your-event-series/url.ics'
);

3.2.11 Meetup.com Input

PHPCalFeed can read event data from a Meetup.com calendar feed, provided you have made the schedule information public. To use a Meetup calendar as your input, do the following:

  1. Visit your group's page on Meetup.com
  2. Note your group's URL username. This is the name that appears in your browser's address bar. For example: http://meetup.com/<your-name-here>/
  3. The URL for your event feed will then be: http://api.meetup.com/<your-name-here>/upcoming.ical where <your-name-here> is your group's URL username.

Next, delete the calendar-config.php file in the calendar script's directory, if it already exists, and create a new one. Set the url property to your Meetup event feed URL, by copying the code exactly as it appears in the section below and replacing the example url:


<?php
return array(
	'format' => 'icalendar-remote',
	'url' => 'http://api.meetup.com/<your-name-here>/upcoming.ical'
);

3.2.12 OpenACalendar input

Events can be imported from an OpenACalendar site like https://opentechcalendar.co.uk/

Create a calendar-config.php file in the calendar script's directory, with some JSON config variables.

<?php
return array(
	'format'=>'openacalendar-remote',
	'url' => 'opentechcalendar.co.uk',
);

The URL should be the base URL of the site, with no protocol or path element.

Other optional variables are:

3.2.13 Event Recurrence Specification

In your input file you can specify an event that takes place on a recurring schedule, such as a social gathering that happens at the same time every week. PHPCalFeed uses a simple text-based format for specifying an event's schedule, which can be used in the CSV and JSON input formats.

The possible event recurrence options are laid out in full in the table below, where nth is a date between 1st and 31st, ddd is the first 3 letters of a day of the week, mmm is the first 3 letters of a month of the year, n is a number and yyyy-mm-dd is a date.

daily
- - - - - - - - -
every n days starting yyyy-mm-dd
- - - - - - - - -
weekly on ddd
nth day
nth to last day
- - - - - - - - -
every n weeks on ddd starting yyyy-mm-dd
nth day
nth to last day
- - - - - - - - -
monthly on nth day
nth to last day
nth ddd
nth to last ddd
- - - - - - - - -
every n months on nth day starting yyyy-mm-dd
nth to last day
nth ddd
nth to last ddd
- - - - - - - - -
yearly on nth day
nth to last day
nth ddd
nth to last day
nth of mmm
nth day of mmm
nth to last day of mmm
- - - - - - - - -
every n years on nth day starting yyyy-mm-dd
nth to last day
nth ddd
nth to last ddd
nth of mmm
nth day of mmm
nth to last day of mmm
nth ddd of mmm
nth to last ddd of mmm

Here are some examples:

  • daily - every day
  • weekly on thu - every Thursday
  • yearly on 8th may - the 8th of May every year
  • yearly on 2nd to last wed of apr - the second-to-last Wednesday of April, each year
  • every 2 weeks on 2nd to last day starting 2013-02-01 - every other Saturday, starting with the one following the 1st February 2013

3.3 Linking to Feeds

3.3.1 Subscribe Button

PHPCalFeed provides a handy subscribe button which you can add to your web pages, giving your visitors a number of different ways to subscribe to your events calendar.

To create your subscribe button, visit the calendar script in your web browser, with the parameter format=html-button on the end of the URL:

http://example.com/calendar.php?format=html-button

You will see what may appear to be a blank page. However, if you view the page source you will find a block of HTML markup which can be copied and pasted into your site's code. To make sure the button is styled correctly, you should add a link to the button's accompanying CSS file. Add the following code inside your page's <head> tag:

<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="calendar-sub.css">

You may need to adjust the href attribute above so that it points to the correct location that you installed the calendar script to. The subscribe button also requires the calendar-sub.png image file. You should make sure that this is present in the same directory as the calendar script.

You can edit calendar-sub.png and calendar-sub.css to change the look and feel of the subscribe button. For more information see the Re-styling the HTML Calendar section.

If no links appear in the subscribe button's pop-up menu, or links do appear but go to the wrong address, you may need to define the URL of the calendar script explicitly. Create the file calendar-config.php in the same directory as the calendar script, if it doesn't exist already, and add the script-url property as follows:


<?php
return array(
	'script-url' => 'http://example.com/calendar/calendar.php'
);

Delete calendar-button.html to clear the cache, and generate the subscribe button again with ?format=html-button as above.

3.3.2 Linking Directly to Feeds

As a more powerful alternative, you can also link direcly to the feeds generated by PHPCalFeed. To do this, simply use the URL of the script file, adding the parameter format= to indicate the format of data to access. For example, to link to an RSS feed, the following URL might be used:

http://example.com/calendar.php?format=rss

The following data formats are available:

icalendar

iCalendar format - a standard calendar data exchange format compatible with iCal, Google Calendar, etc.

rss

RSS 2.0 format - a standard news aggregation format compatible with many news readers and other applications. Note that to generate this output, the libxml and DOM extensions must be enabled for your server's PHP installation.

xml

XML format - a popular and widely supported data exchange format. Note that to generate this output, the libxml and DOM extensions must be enabled for your server's PHP installation.

json

JSON format - another popular, widely supported data exchange format. Note that to generate this output, the JSON and Multibyte String extensions must be enabled for your server's PHP installation.

jsonp

JSON wrapped in a function call - suitable for fetching via Javascript. Use the callback parameter to specify the function name to use. Note that to generate this output, the JSON and Multibyte String extensions must be enabled for your server's PHP installation.

html

HTML format (full) - a full webpage for users to view the event data directly in the browser. Note that to generate this output, the libxml and DOM extensions must be enabled for your server's PHP installation.

html-frag

HTML format (fragment) - just the HTML for the calendar itself, suitable for embedding in another page. Note that to generate this output, the libxml and DOM extensions must be enabled for your server's PHP installation.

html-button

HTML format (subscribe button) - just the HTML for the calendar subscribe button, suitable for embedding in anoter page. Note that to generate this output, the libxml and DOM extensions must be enabled for your server's PHP installation.

s-exp

S-Expression format - a data format used by the Lisp programming language.

If no format parameter is specified, the appropriate format will be negotiated with the requesting client according to what it can support. When viewing in a browser, this will typically result in full HTML format.

When linking to the ICalendar feed, it is recommended to specify "webcal" as the protocol by prefixing the URL with webcal:// rather than the usual http://. This will help the browser to open the feed in an ICalendar-compatible application.

3.4 Displaying in Another PHP Script

The event data can be included in HTML format in another PHP page. To do this, simply include the PHP script using an include or require statement. For example:


<html>
	<body>
		<p>This is my page</p>
		<p>Here is a calendar:</p>
		
		<?php include "calendar.php"; ?>
	</body>
</html>

3.5 Caching Notes

The script generates static files in the various feed formats, so that they can be served quickly. These files will be updated once per day, or if the source data file is updated (local file only).

The source format is cached to calendar-config.php. If the format of the source data is changed, (e.g. changing from CSV to JSON), this file should be removed.

To force the cache to clear, simply delete calendar.html and visit the script in your browser. The other feed formats will be recreated along with the HTML output.

The subscribe button HTML is cached separately. Delete calendar-button.html and visit the script with ?format=html-button to recreate it.

If the calendar script encounters an error when generating the feed files, the error will be cached to calendar.error for 20 minutes. To force the script to try again, delete this file and visit the script in the browser.

3.6 Renaming the Script File

The calendar.php script can be renamed if required. Note that the script will expect the other accompanying files to be renamed too. For example, before renaming the set of files might look like this:

calendar.php
calendar.xsd
calendar-cal.css
calendar-sub.css
calendar-sub.png
calendar-config.php
calendar-master.csv
calendar.html
calendar-frag.html
calendar-button.html
calendar.json
calendar.xml
calendar.ics
calendar.rss
calendar.lsp

But we could rename them as follows:

events.php
events.xsd
events-cal.css
events-sub.css
events-sub.png
events-config.php
events-master.csv
events.html
events-frag.html
events-button.html
events.json
events.xml
events.ics
events.rss
events.lsp

3.7 Re-styling the HTML Calendar

The HTML version of the calendar feed (format=html) uses the Cascading Style Sheet file calendar-cal.css to apply its visual style. The generated HTML assigns different class attributes to the various page components which are referenced by this CSS file, making it easy to modify and thereby give your calendar page a different look and feel.

The name and purpose of each CSS class is explained below:

  • cal-container - the outermost container surrounding the title, description, and calendar tables, and footer.
  • cal-title - the header containing the name of the calendar
  • cal-description - the block of text containing the calendar description
  • cal-calendar - each of the tables representing a calendar month
  • cal-day - each table cell representing a calendar day
  • cal-outside-day - a table cell representing a day which falls outside of the current month
  • cal-today - the table cell representing today's date
  • cal-date - the label inside each table cell indicating that cell's day of the month
  • cal-month-title - the label for each table indicating which month it represents
  • cal-day-title - the labels for each table column indicating which day of the week it represents
  • cal-events - the container for each day's list of events
  • cal-event - the container for each event
  • cal-nav-link - the links to jump to each calendar month
  • cal-hcal-link - the footer link to the hCalendar spec

In addition to these classes, each calendar table is given an id attribute:

  • cal-calendar-0 - the current month's calendar table
  • cal-calendar-1 - next month's calendar table
  • cal-calendar-2 - the month after next's calendar table

The subscribe button for the HTML calendar has its own CSS file, calendar-sub.css, so that it can be included in other pages separately. The name and purpose of each class defined in this file is explained below:

  • calsub-button - the outermost container surrounding the button.
  • calsub-link - the anchor element inside the button, allowing the button itself to be clicked as a link.
  • calsub-menu - the popup menu containing the various subscribe options
  • calsub-item - a subscribe option within the popup menu
  • calsub-icalendar, calsub-google, calsub-live, calsub-rss, calsub-json, calsub-xml, calsub-sexp - these classes identify the individual subscribe options.

The subscribe button image and the subscribe icons can be found in the CSS spritesheet calendar-sub.png.

4 Licence

Released under the MIT licence. See the LICENCE file for the full text of this licence.

5 Credits

Written by Mark Frimston