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How Hannah Solved The Twelve-Disk Tower of Hanoi #76

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nothings opened this Issue Nov 9, 2014 · 6 comments

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nothings commented Nov 9, 2014

I've done a first draft of this.

First, Hannah moved the twelfth and smallest disk, the white one, from the left peg to the middle peg.
At this point Hannah moved the eleventh, purple, disk from the left peg to the right peg.
Then Hannah moved the white disk from the middle peg to the right peg.
Next Hannah moved the tenth, magenta, disk from the left peg to the middle peg.

I'm going to work on it further, unless somebody's already done something along these lines, which seems totally possible but I didn't turn up anything googling it.

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dariusk Nov 9, 2014

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Aaaaaaa Sean, this is great. I was just the other day espousing the (ah, relative) virtues of setting up a puzzle and narrating its solution!

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dariusk commented Nov 9, 2014

Aaaaaaa Sean, this is great. I was just the other day espousing the (ah, relative) virtues of setting up a puzzle and narrating its solution!

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hugovk Nov 9, 2014

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Yep, like #22, the narrated maze.

Reminds me of the Risk Campaign Book by Arnold Rimmer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u_SPFa4YP7I
http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/73377/arnold-rimmer-king-risk

You know, you could take chess notation from classic games and pad them out in a similar way.

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hugovk commented Nov 9, 2014

Yep, like #22, the narrated maze.

Reminds me of the Risk Campaign Book by Arnold Rimmer:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u_SPFa4YP7I
http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/73377/arnold-rimmer-king-risk

You know, you could take chess notation from classic games and pad them out in a similar way.

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nothings Nov 9, 2014

Oh, that narrated maze is quite the same idea, yep.

Still, the fact that Hanoi always has an explicit end in sight, the way the title tells you upfront exactly what you're in for, I guess makes it different enough for me to want to continue.

nothings commented Nov 9, 2014

Oh, that narrated maze is quite the same idea, yep.

Still, the fact that Hanoi always has an explicit end in sight, the way the title tells you upfront exactly what you're in for, I guess makes it different enough for me to want to continue.

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nothings Nov 9, 2014

Someone was just claiming the other day that there is software that takes a notated sports game and generates a fictionalized story of the events from the notation, a bit like the old classic baseball announcer making up everything (including sound effects) while reading about the game off the wire.

You could imagine taking, say, a team's entire season and generating a novel "about" their rise and fall and rise or whatever that's mostly just such a play-by-play story. A bit like what modern sports videogames do with their simulated sports announcers, even.

Yet another idea: generate a play or movie screenplay, by interleaving action descriptions of a character solving the tower of hanoi or other puzzle (or even one per character) with some existing play's dialogue.

nothings commented Nov 9, 2014

Someone was just claiming the other day that there is software that takes a notated sports game and generates a fictionalized story of the events from the notation, a bit like the old classic baseball announcer making up everything (including sound effects) while reading about the game off the wire.

You could imagine taking, say, a team's entire season and generating a novel "about" their rise and fall and rise or whatever that's mostly just such a play-by-play story. A bit like what modern sports videogames do with their simulated sports announcers, even.

Yet another idea: generate a play or movie screenplay, by interleaving action descriptions of a character solving the tower of hanoi or other puzzle (or even one per character) with some existing play's dialogue.

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hugovk Nov 9, 2014

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For now consider this: Every 30 seconds or so, the algorithmic bull pen of Narrative Science, a 30-person company occupying a large room on the fringes of the Chicago Loop, extrudes a story whose very byline is a question of philosophical inquiry. The computer-written product could be a pennant-waving second-half update of a Big Ten basketball contest, a sober preview of a corporate earnings statement, or a blithe summary of the presidential horse race drawn from Twitter posts. The articles run on the websites of respected publishers like Forbes, as well as other Internet media powers (many of which are keeping their identities private). Niche news services hire Narrative Science to write updates for their subscribers, be they sports fans, small-cap investors, or fast-food franchise owners.

http://new-aesthetic.tumblr.com/post/47087200567/for-now-consider-this-every-30-seconds-or-so-the

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hugovk commented Nov 9, 2014

For now consider this: Every 30 seconds or so, the algorithmic bull pen of Narrative Science, a 30-person company occupying a large room on the fringes of the Chicago Loop, extrudes a story whose very byline is a question of philosophical inquiry. The computer-written product could be a pennant-waving second-half update of a Big Ten basketball contest, a sober preview of a corporate earnings statement, or a blithe summary of the presidential horse race drawn from Twitter posts. The articles run on the websites of respected publishers like Forbes, as well as other Internet media powers (many of which are keeping their identities private). Niche news services hire Narrative Science to write updates for their subscribers, be they sports fans, small-cap investors, or fast-food franchise owners.

http://new-aesthetic.tumblr.com/post/47087200567/for-now-consider-this-every-30-seconds-or-so-the

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cpressey Nov 9, 2014

The animals' dialogue in @amarriner's maze-novel distinctly reminded me of "Go Fish". Arnold Rimmer's Risk Campaign Book, though, brings to mind that there may be much more interesting card games than that that could be narrated (see also this and this.)

cpressey commented Nov 9, 2014

The animals' dialogue in @amarriner's maze-novel distinctly reminded me of "Go Fish". Arnold Rimmer's Risk Campaign Book, though, brings to mind that there may be much more interesting card games than that that could be narrated (see also this and this.)

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