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README.md

Table of Contents

Introduction

Apple /// Ready-to-Run is a bundle of support files, docs, and scripts for MESS Apple /// emulation (http://www.mess.org/). Included is an HDD image with many popular Apple /// titles (source: http://apple3.org) preinstalled so that you can get started with your own virtual Apple /// as quickly as possible.

Version

Version 2.1, released Nov 11 2017

What's in the Box

  • Apple /// Computer
  • (3) External Floppy Drives
  • CFFA2 Mass Storage Adapter in Slot 1
    • 128 MB Internal Hard Disk Drive (HDD) Partitioned into:
      • (2) 16MB Partitions:
        • /BOS (.PROFILE)
        • /HOME (.CFIDE2)
      • Space for 6 additional 16MB partitions available
  • Thunderclock Card in Slot 2 for second resolution time
  • Appli-Card 6 MHz z80 CP/M Adapter in Slot 3 for running those other business applications (and games!)
  • AppleColor Monitor 100

Preinstalled Software on HDD

  • BOS 1.0, the most advanced Apple /// Operating System
    • BOS Program Switcher
    • BOS Utilities
  • SOS 1.3 System Utilities
  • Backup ///
  • Lazarus ///
  • Access /// 3.2X (Demo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GuVev9AYGIc)
  • Access 3270 1.0
  • Apple Writer ///
  • VisiCalc Advanced (Demo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUx6TfEPDYA)
  • /// E-Z Pieces
  • Quick File ///
  • Draw ON ///
  • Apple /// Business Basic 1.23
  • Apple /// Pascal 1.1
  • Apple /// Fortran
  • Apple /// COBOL
  • CP/M 2.2 (2 MB Virtual HDD (E:) as file /BOS/CPM1)
    • WordStar 3.0
    • DBaseII 2.3B
    • Turbo Pascal 3.01A
    • Zork I: The Great Underground Empire
    • Zork II: The Wizard of Frobozz
    • Zork III: The Dungeon Master
    • SARGON 2.1

Installation

git clone https://github.com/datajerk/apple3rtr.git

or

Download https://github.com/datajerk/apple3rtr/archive/master.zip and extract (you'll want to rename apple3rtr-master to apple3rtr).

This document assumes that all work will be in the apple3rtr directory.

SDL and MAME Installation

OSX

  • SDL 2.x is required (http://www.libsdl.org/download-2.0.php)

    Open SDL2-2.x.x.dmg and drag SDL2.framework to /Library/Frameworks

  • SDLMAME 64-bit 0.155 or later: http://sdlmame.lngn.net

    Extract and place in your path or in the apple3rtr directory.

    E.g.:

     cd apple3rtr
     curl http://sdlmame.lngn.net/mame0191-64bit.zip > mame0191-64bit.zip
     unzip mame0191-64bit.zip
     cd mame0191-64bit
     cp -a * ..
     cd ..
     rm -rf mame0191-64bit*
    

Windows

Linux

  • Varies depending on distribution. SDL 2.x and MESS 0.155 or later required.

Roll Your Own (assumes OSX or Linux)

  • Install SDL 2.x.x development libraries (http://www.libsdl.org/download-2.0.php)

  • Build from source:

     git clone https://github.com/mamedev/mame.git
     cd mame
     make TARGET=mess PTR64=1 -j4
    

    Change -j4 to -j# of cores to get faster builds.

Cold Booting

If mess64 is not in your path, then provide the full path name to mess64.

OSX and Linux users, if mame64 is in apple3rtr then type ./mame64.

  1. Type on a single line (but do not press RETURN--yet):

    mame64 apple3 -skip_gameinfo -volume -24 -resolution 1024x768 -effect Scanlines0x4 -sl1 cffa2 -hard apple3.hd -sl2 thclock -sl3 applicard -ramsize 512k
    

Adjust -volume and -resolution to your taste. Volume 0 is the loudest.

-effect Scanlines0x4 is optional and only optimized for 1024x768.

Smaller scanline options: -resolution 768x576 -effect Scanlines75x3

Even smaller scanline options: -resolution 512x384 -effect Scanlines75x2

  1. Append to the command line above one of the following floppy images and then press RETURN:

    The bosboot and cmpboot images below have been modified to support the CFFA2 adapter.

  • Apple /// Demo Disk:

    -flop1 demodisk.dsk

  • BOS 1.0 (4) Disk III system with Apple /// preinstalled applications on HDD (/BOS):

    -flop1 bosboot.dsk

  • CP/M 2.2 (4) Disk III system with CP/M preinstalled applications on HDD (/BOS/CPM1 (E:)):

    A: = .D1, B: = .D2, C: = .D3, D: = .D4, E: = .PROFILE/CPM1

    -flop1 cpmboot.po

  • CFFA Utility to create or delete partitions (***DO NOT DELETE /BOS!***):

    -flop1 cffautil_1.40a.dsk

How to Operate Your Virtual Apple ///

All the keys on your keyboard should correspond to the correct Apple /// keys (Left-Option/Alt = Open-Apple and Right-Option/Alt = Close-Apple). The DELETE/BACKSPACE key has been remapped to the Apple /// LEFT ARROW key since there is no DELETE or BACKSPACE Apple /// key (each Apple /// application will determine how the LEFT ARROW behaves). The F3 key has been mapped to RESET.

To remove or insert virtual floppies you will have to engage PARTIAL Emulation mode and then launch the UI Menu.

The default for MESS is to use the INSERT key to toggle PARTIAL/FULL Emulation mode and to use the TAB key to launch and dismiss the UI Menu. There are a few issues with the MESS defaults. First, not all keyboards have an INSERT key, and 2nd, while in PARTIAL Emulation mode keys sent for special functions such as launching the UI Menu are also sent to the Apple ///. This can contribute to a poor experience.

To address the aforementioned the PARTIAL/FULL Emulation mode, toggle has been mapped to the F1 key, and the UI Menu to the F2 key.

OSX users: If you have F1/F2 set to control brightness (default OSX behavior) then use fn-F1 and fn-F2 for F1 and F2 anytime you are instructed to use F1 or F2.

To remove or insert a virtual floppy press F1 to engage PARTIAL Emulation mode, then immediately press F2 to access the UI Menu.

In the UI Menu, DOWN ARROW to the File Manager, press RETURN, select the drive, and then select the new floppy image. After you have made any and all changes in the UI Menu use F2 to quickly return to the Apple ///, then F1 to return to FULL Emulation mode.

Avoid using ESC or Return to System. The last RETURN will get sent to the system when the UI Menu exits, and if not careful in PARTIAL Emulation mode an ESC will power off the Apple ///.

In summary:

  1. F1, F2 (or fn-F1,F2)
  2. ARROW to File Manager
  3. Select your images
  4. F2, F1 (or fn-F2,F1)

To power down your Apple ///: Quit any applications, and then select Quit from the BOS Program Switcher. If using CP/M, just quit your application first. For any other single disk application, just quit. Now you are ready to power down. To power down press F1 (fn-F1) to enter PARTIAL Emulation mode, then press ESC to shutdown.

While in PARTIAL Emulation mode many of the other keys on the keyboard will be setup to perform other functions, e.g. P will PAUSE the Apple ///. Refer to the MESS documentation (http://www.mess.org/mess/howto#using_mess) and be careful!

Known Issues

  • Apple ][ emulation via BOS does not work. Use a proper Apple ][ emulation diskette image.

Support

More Info About MESS Apple ///

http://rbelmont.mameworld.info/

Advanced HOW-TOs

Using Meat-net to get data/programs in and out of the Apple ///

Getting things in and out of the Apple /// can be done with comm programs (see Get "online" with Access ///), VSDRIVE (see VSDRIVE), or by direct manipulation of apple3.hd (see Directly Manipulating apple3.hd). However, using floppy images is probably the easiest and most straightforward.

For SOS, AppleCommander works very well: http://applecommander.sourceforge.net. CiderPress for Windows/WINE also works: http://ciderpress.sourceforge.net.

For CP/M, use CPMTools (http://www.moria.de/~michael/cpmtools/) with a format type of apple-do for DOS and apple-po for ProDOS ordered disk images. OSX users will need to install the CLI development tools to build. Windows users can download Bill Buckels binaries from http://www.cpm8680.com/cpmtools.

DOS order images should be suffixed with .do or .dsk, and ProDOS/SOS ordered disk images should be suffixed with .po. The incorrect suffix will confuse MESS.

See How to Operate Your Virtual Apple /// (above) for instructions on working with floppy images.

Fortran /// Q&D

  1. Launch Pascal ///, edit and save your program, e.g. /HOME/HELLO.F
  2. From Pascal ///, X)ecute /BOS/FORTRAN/FORTRAN or launch Fortran /// from the BOS Menu.
  3. Follow the prompts, e.g. /HOME/HELLO.F, /HOME/HELLO
  4. From System Utilities copy /BOS/FORTRAN/SYSTEM.LIBRARY to /HOME/HELLO.LIB
  5. From Pascal ///, X)ecute /HOME/HELLO

Google Apple III Fortran Reference Manual for more details.

Get "online" with Access ///

The MESS 0.155 Apple /// driver now includes RS-232 support. To enable for communications use append: -rs232 null_modem -bitb <target>, where <target> is a socket descriptor (socket.host:port) for TCP-based bidirectional null-modem communications, e.g. socket.127.0.0.1:2023.

If MESS crashes while starting with -rs232 null_modem -bitb socket..., then wait 30 seconds and try again.

As with physical null-modem serial-to-serial communications it is necessary to match the baud (300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 115200) and protocol (e.g. 8-N-1) on both ends. For the MESS end of the null-modem connection this can be accomplished via the System Configuration menu in the UI Menu. The default is 9600, 8-N-1. For the Apple /// end, the settings may be available in the application (e.g. Access ///) or may require a change to the .RS232 driver configuration block via the System Configuration Program (SCP). See the Apple /// Standard Device Drivers Manual for more details.

E.g., /bin/bash access from Access ///:

  1. Install socat

    E.g. MacPorts (https://www.macports.org/) users can type:

    sudo port install socat
    
  2. Type:

    socat tcp-l:2023,reuseaddr,fork exec:/bin/bash,pty,setsid,setpgid,stderr,ctty &
    

    IMPORTANT: POTENTIAL SECURITY RISK!!! USE A FIREWALL OR READ SOCAT DOCS ON HOW TO LIMIT ACCESS!!!

  3. Append to MESS command line:

    -rs232 null_modem -bitb socket.127.0.0.1:2023
    
  4. After shutting down MESS kill socat:

    kill %1
    

Video demo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GuVev9AYGIc

VSDRIVE

VSDRIVE (Virtual Serial Drive) is an RS-232-based virtual drive hosted by a Mac or PC running ADTPro in localhost mode. Before continuing please read http://adtpro.com/vdrive.html to familiarize yourself with VSDRIVE.

VSDRIVE is a built-in feature of ADTPro. ADTPro-2.0.3 (http://adtpro.com/download.html) has been tested and is included with this distribution.

In the disks subdirectory of the included ADTPro-2.0.3 there are two zip files, v800k.zip and v16m.zip, containing two files, Virtual.po and Virtual2.po. The sizes are 800K and 16M respectively. You can replace them with any size ProDOS formatted volume as long as the volume is < 16MB (max recognized by SOS) and the names unchanged. You can create new virtual disks with AppleCommander (http://applecommander.sourceforge.net/) or CiderPress (http://ciderpress.sourceforge.net/).

< 16MB is 32767 sectors (max). The provided 16MB images are 32767 sectors.

To start VSDRIVE:

  1. Type: cd ADTPro-2.0.3/disks

  2. Unzip v800k.zip for two 800K virtual disks or unzip v16m.zip for two 16M virtual disks.

    OSX and Linux users can type unzip filename.zip.

  3. Type: cd ..

  4. Type: ./adtpro.sh localhost & (OSX, Linux) or adtpro localhost (PC).

  5. Type: cd ..

To use VSDRIVE standalone, append to the MESS command line:

-flop1 VDRIVE-2.0.3.DSK -rs232 null_modem -bitb socket.127.0.0.1:1977

To use VSDRIVE with BOS, CFFA2, etc..., append to the MESS command line:

-flop1 bosbootvsd.dsk -rs232 null_modem -bitb socket.127.0.0.1:1977

IMPORTANT: IN ALL CASES, CHANGE THE BAUD RATE FROM THE UI MENU TO 115200 BEFORE ACCESSING .VSDRIVE or .VSDRIVE2! See Get "online" with Access /// about changing baud rates.

If MESS crashes while starting with -rs232 null_modem -bitb socket..., then wait 30 seconds and try again.

The 16M Virtual.po and Virtual2.po will be mounted as /V and /V2 respectively. The 800K Virtual.po and Virtual2.po will be mounted as /VDRIVE.2.0.3 and /VDRIVE2.2.0.3 respectively. Alternatively, .VSDRIVE and .VSDRIVE2 can be used.

The bosboot VSDRIVE disks have .RS232 and .PRINTER removed. Serial printing and other non-VSDRIVE serial functions will be unavailable.

To use VSDRIVE with any other boot disks, use the System Configuration Program (SCP) to add the driver VSDRIVE.A3DRVR from VDRIVE-2.0.3.DSK. See the Apple /// Standard Device Drivers Manual for more details.

VSDRIVE performs slower than the CFFA2. The intended purpose is for large scale transfers the Apple /// way. Advanced users will want to use the direct methods below.

Video demo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-EU9nii2hM

Directly Manipulating apple3.hd

HOW-TOs Using Meat-net to get data/programs in and out of the Apple ///, Get "online" with Access ///, and VSDRIVE provide Apple /// "native" ways of transferring files (diskette, serial, and VSDRIVE). However, the fastest way, is to directly manipulate the HDD image from the host OS.

Prerequisites:

  1. The chdman utility located in the MESS tools directory. Hopefully your MESS binary distribution includes this utility.

  2. The dd command. Windows users will need to install/use cygwin (http://www.cygwin.com/) and run the following commands from a bash shell.

To extract the BOS and HOME volumes, type:

tools/chdman extracthd -f -i apple3.hd -o apple3.hd.image
dd if=apple3.hd.image of=bos.po bs=512 skip=1 count=32767
dd if=apple3.hd.image of=home.po bs=512 skip=32768 count=32767

The chdman extracthd command will extract the raw bits from the CHD formatted apple3.hd image into the file apple3.hd.image.

The two dd commands will create the files bos.po and home.po. Both are 16MB ProDOS (SOS) formatted images that can be directly manipulated with AppleCommander (http://applecommander.sourceforge.net/) or CiderPress (http://ciderpress.sourceforge.net/).

To create a new HD image from existing bos.po and home.po images:

  1. Backup your files with:

    cp -f apple3.hd apple3.hd.backup
    cp -f apple3.hd.image apple3.hd.image.backup
    
  2. Concatenate the partition table, bos.po, home.po, and the rest of the original image into a new image (The ( and ) are part of the command):

    (dd if=apple3.hd.image.backup bs=512 count=1; cat bos.po home.po; dd if=apple3.hd.image.backup bs=512 skip=65535) >apple3.hd.image
    
  3. Create a new [replacement] CHD formatted HDD image:

    tools/chdman createhd -f -c none -i apple3.hd.image -o apple3.hd
    
  4. Test your new image.

  5. Cleanup (or not, it's a good to have a backup), type:

    rm apple3.hd.backup apple3.hd.image.backup apple3.hd.image bos.po home.po
    

Upgrade apple3.hd while preserving your HOME volume

Directly manipulating apple3.hd is a handy way to preserve your data with updated apple3.hd images included with this distribution, e.g.:

  1. Dump current HOME volume:

    tools/chdman extracthd -f -i apple3.hd -o apple3.hd.image
    dd if=apple3.hd.image of=home.po bs=512 skip=32768 count=32767
    
  2. Install new apple3.hd from distribution (or just extract new apple3rtr release)

  3. Dump new BOS volume:

    tools/chdman extracthd -f -i apple3.hd -o apple3.hd.image
    dd if=apple3.hd.image of=bos.po bs=512 skip=1 count=32767
    
  4. Combine into a new apple3.hd:

    cp -f apple3.hd apple3.hd.backup
    cp -f apple3.hd.image apple3.hd.image.backup
    (dd if=apple3.hd.image.backup bs=512 count=1; cat bos.po home.po; dd if=apple3.hd.image.backup bs=512 skip=65535) >apple3.hd.image
    tools/chdman createhd -f -c none -i apple3.hd.image -o apple3.hd
    
  5. Clean up (or not):

    rm apple3.hd.backup apple3.hd.image.backup apple3.hd.image bos.po home.po
    

Directly Manipulating CPM1

The safest way to work with the CP/M HD image is from CP/M using floppy images to add or backup content. However, the advanced user, may find that a bit pedestrian.

Prerequisites:

  1. CLEARLY UNDERSTAND Directly Manipulating apple3.hd (above).

  2. Download and install CPMTools (http://www.moria.de/~michael/cpmtools/). OSX users will need to install the CLI development tools to build. Windows users can download Bill Buckels binaries: http://www.cpm8680.com/cpmtools.

  3. Edit CPMTools diskdefs and append:

    diskdef a3cpmhd
      seclen 128
      tracks 512
      sectrk 32
      blocksize 4096
      maxdir 512
      skew 0
      boottrk 2
      os 2.2
    end
    

    If you create a different size CPM1 or CPM2, then you will need to use STAT x:DSK: where x is the HD image letter to get the geometry info required to build a CPMTools disk definition. E.g.:

        E: Drive Characteristics
    16320: 128 Byte Record Capacity
     2040: Kilobyte Drive  Capacity
      512: 32  Byte Directory Entries
        0: Checked  Directory Entries
      256: Records/ Extent
       32: Records/ Block
       32: Sectors/ Track
        2: Reserved Tracks
    
  4. Extract CPM1 from bos.po:

    A. Follow Directly Manipulating apple3.hd and extract bos.po.

    B. Using AppleCommander or CiderPress extract CPM1, e.g. OSX:

    alias applecmd='java -jar /Applications/AppleCommander.app/Contents/Resources/Java/AppleCommander.jar'
    applecmd -g bos.po cpm1 >CPM1
    

Directly Manipulate CPM1:

At this point you should have a 2097152 byte file called CPM1. Use the CPMTools commands cpmls, cpmcp, cpmrm, etc... with the -f a3cpmhd option to directly manipulate CPM1, e.g.:

Listing files from CPM1, type:

cpmls -f a3cpmhd CPM1

Extract files from CPM1, type:

cpmcp -f a3cpmhd cpm1 0:zork1.com zork1.com

Remove or Write/Update files to CPM1, type:

cpmrm -f a3cpmhd CPM1 0:sargon.com
cpmcp -f a3cpmhd CPM1 ~/Downloads/SARGON.COM 0:sargon.com

You must remove the file first (if it exists).

Updating bos.po with CPM1:

  1. Use AppleCommander or CiderPress to remove the old CPM1 and replace it with the new CPM1, e.g. OSX:

    applecmd -d bos.po CPM1
    applecmd -p bos.po CPM1 PDA <CPM1
    
  2. Follow Directly Manipulating apple3.hd to update/create apple3.hd with the updated bos.po.

    An alternative to using Directly Manipulating apple3.hd would be VSDRIVE by copying /BOS/CPM1 to .VSDRIVE, and then using AppleCommander or CiderPress to extract/replace CPM1 from Virtual.po.

Printing

The MESS 0.155 Apple /// driver now includes RS-232 support. To enable for printer use append: -rs232 null_modem -bitb <target>, where <target> is a filename for the printer output, e.g. printer.txt.

As with physical null-modem serial-to-serial communications it is necessary to match the baud (300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 115200) and protocol (e.g. 8-N-1) on both ends. For the MESS end of the null-modem connection this can be accomplished via the System Configuration menu in the UI Menu. The default is 9600, 8-N-1. For the Apple /// end, the settings are available in the .PRINTER driver configuration block via the System Configuration Program (SCP). See the Apple /// Standard Device Drivers Manual for more details.

bosboot.dsk and cpmboot.po have .PRINTER set to 9600 8-N-1 to match the MESS default.

To capture printer output append to MESS command line:

-rs232 null_modem -bitb printer.txt

SOS Printing, use: .PRINTER

CP/M Printing, use: LST:

If given an option to append line feeds (LF) to carriage returns (CR), take it.

Video demo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ndU764dS23I

Disable All Audio

Just append to command line:

-audiodriver none

Joystick

The MESS 0.155 Apple /// driver now inlcudes analog joystick support.

Your average USB retro gamepad/stick will not work since Apple /// joysticks are analog. Get an analog stick.

Tested analog sticks:

Nothing is required except to connect your joystick before launching MESS. Use the Analog Controls menu from the UI Menu to adjust the center and sensitivity as necessary.

Video demo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9pj7LUF6g8

Numeric Pad

No mystery here, but there are some applications that require a numeric keypad. E.g. Draw ON ///.

The following has been tested with OSX MESS:

Boot from VSDRIVE

The latest versions of MESS and ADTPro have measurably increased the speed of VSDRIVE making it an option as your primary HD. "Why?", you ask. Answer: simple direct access to /BOS and /HOME as Virtual.po and Virtual2.po.

To make the switch from CFFA to VSDRIVE:

  1. Follow Directly Manipulating apple3.hd to extract bos.po and home.po.

  2. Move bos.po and home.po to ADTPro-2.0.3/disks as Virtual.po and Virtual2.po, e.g. type:

    mv bos.po ADTPro-2.0.3/disks/Virtual.po
    mv home.po ADTPro-2.0.3/disks/Virtual2.po
    
  3. Start ADTPro Server, type:

    cd ADTPro-2.0.3
    Mac/Linux: ./adtpro.sh localhost &
    Windows: adtpro localhost
    cd ..
    
  4. Use the following boot image and RS232 settings:

    -flop1 bosbootvsdroot.dsk -rs232 null_modem -bitb socket.127.0.0.1:1977
    

    IMPORTANT: THE BPS RATE MUST BE SET TO 115K. You've got about 5 seconds to set it on boot, however after setting the first time MESS will remember.

ADTPro must be restarted anytime there is an out-of-band, i.e. direct manipulation of Virtual.po or Virtual2.po. IOW, shutdown MESS, then ADTPro before changing Virtual.po or Virtual2.po.

Not 100% stable. YMMV.

Using the boot Script (OSX and Linux only)

If typing long command lines is too unpleasant for you, then consider using the boot script included with this distribution. boot provides an easy way to launch MESS Apple /// emulation with most of the aforementioned options listed in this document. boot will also attempt to coordinate the launching of other required services, e.g. socat and ADTPro.

boot has not been agressively tested. YMMV.

To launch boot simply type: ./boot from the apple3rtr directory.

If you do not pass any options to ./boot, then you'll get the following output:

$ ./boot

Usage: boot [-h] [-sml] [-r prt|null|vsd] [-o port] [-acn] diskimage1 [diskimage2 diskimage3 ...]

diskimage1 (and only diskimage1) may use the following optional aliases:

    bos       = bosboot.dsk
    cpm       = cpmboot.po
    vsd       = bosvsdboot.dsk
    vsdroot   = bosvsdrootboot.dsk

    -h        display this help and exit
    -s        512x384 resolution with scanlines
    -m        768x576 resolution with scanlines
    -l        1024x768 resolution with scanlines
    -r prt    rs232 printer @ 9600 BPS outputing to printer.txt
    -r null   rs232 null modem @ 9600 BPS listening on "port", default 2023
    -r full   rs232 null modem @ 115K BPS listening on "port", default 2023
    -r vsd    rs232 null modem @ 115K BPS listening on "port", default 1977
    -o port   override default port (requires -r), port = 0 will be random
    -a        launch ADTPro on port specified by -r vsd or -o
    -c        launch socat on port specified by -r null or -o
    -n        no HD

Most users will just run ./boot bos. This will boot up a virtual Apple /// using the following command:

mess64 apple3 -skip_gameinfo -volume -24 -sl1 cffa2 -hard apple3.hd -sl2 thclock -sl3 applicard -ramsize 512k -resolution 768x576 -effect Scanlines75x3 -flop1 bosboot.dsk

bos is an alias for bosboot.dsk, other aliases are listed for your reference when invoking ./boot without any parameters. You can of course supply any diskette image name, as well as the names for diskette images you'll like inserted in to virtual floppy drives .D2, .D3, and .D4.

You can modify the behavior with the options listed above. E.g. say you wanted to use BOS with VSDRIVE, simply type ./boot -a -r vsd vsd, e.g.:

$ ./boot -a -r vsd vsd
ADTPro Server version 2.0.3

Running... mess64 apple3 -skip_gameinfo -volume -24 -sl1 cffa2 -hard apple3.hd -sl2 thclock -sl3 applicard -ramsize 512k -resolution 768x576 -effect Scanlines75x3 -flop1 bosbootvsd.dsk -rs232 null_modem -bitb socket.127.0.0.1:1977

This command will launch ADTPro and connect MESS to it for VSDRIVE support from BOS. MESS will also be configured for 115K BPS serial speeds. After exiting MESS, ADTPro will be shutdown.

You must have Virtual.po and Virtual2.po prepared first. If not setup, then ADTPro will create two blank 800K disk images.

The rest of the options should be fairly strait forward.

  • -s, -m, -l are essentially small, medium, large display sizes (see the boot help output for the exact sizes). The default is medium.

  • -r specifies RS-232 support and takes a single argument (prt, null, full, vsd) that is used to determine 9600 or 115K BPS as well as what port to connect to.

  • If you are having problem with TCP sockets taking a long time to time out you can override the port number with -o port number. A port number of 0 (e.g. -o 0) will generate a random port using the range 1000-1999. -o requires -r.

  • -a will launch ADTPro and configure it to listen to the port specified by -r and -o. -a and -c are mutually exclusive. ADTPro will be killed when MESS exits.

  • -c will launch socat and configure it to listen to the port specified by -r and -o. -c and -a are mutually exclusive. socat will be killed when MESS exits.

    It is not necessary to use -a or -c if you launch the services yourself.

  • -n will not use the CFFA adapter excluding the use of apple3.hd