Sample code from PythonLab classes
Switch branches/tags
Nothing to show
Clone or download
Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.
Permalink
Failed to load latest commit information.
2014-12/20
2015-01
2015-04
2015-06/06
2015-07
2015-08
2015-09
2015-10
2015-11
2015-12
2016-01
2016-02
2016-03
2016-04
2016-05
2016-06
2016-07
2016-08
2016-09
2016-10
2016-11
2016-12
2017-01
2017-02
2017-04
2017-05
2017-06
2017-08
2017-09/16
2017-10
2017-11
.gitignore
GPL.md
LICENSE.md
README.md
extra-practice.md
installing.md
learning.md
resources.md

README.md

dcpylab-classes

This is the page for sample code and other resources for the Saturday DC Python Lab (originally at MLK Library).

Sample code and other assorted materials are sorted by date. There are also resources listed for installing and learning Python. It's a big help to everyone if you have Python and a text editor already installed when you come to class, but if you're having problems we'll do our best to sort you out!

NOTE: The class uses the current version of Python (Python 3), but originally used Python 2.7. So don't worry if you already have Python 2 installed or are using it with another class or tutorial. We can work with both!

If you have any questions please contact Rami, the course instructor (through Twitter, Meetup, or email)

A few notes on why it's great to learn Python

🐍 It's free. You can download it for free, there are ways to learn it for free, and there's a whole range of packages available for free. There may be a time when you want to pay for classes, but you can get started without a major investment.

🐍 It's easy. Other languages make you remember strange commands or keep track of curly braces everywhere. Not so with Python. That makes it a great beginner programing language.

🐍 It's everywhere. It's a powerful language that is used by a wide variety of companies and organizations to solve all sorts of problems, including areas you don't think of as software problems. Python is used in large tech companies, political organizations, in academia and more.

🐍 It's community-focused. Python exists solely because of volunteers and has a great community both online and off that connects people. There are plenty of meetups here in DC and throughout the area, plus there are conferences around the world. The Python community is known for being open, encouraging, and welcoming to newcomers!

Check back on the website for more details!