Permission management plugin for Rails
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README.textile

Furwall Plugin for Rails

Furwall plugin provides functionality to prevent unauthorized access to
objects within your controllers. It provides both model and controller extensions
to manage permissions on objects and classes depending on performed action.
The plugin works as an extension to acl_system2
plugin by Ezra Zygmuntowicz & Fabien Franzen.

Installation

In order to use this plugin you should install acl_system2 plugin, assign roles
to your users and check that the plugin works as expected.

Next, install the plugin to vendor/plugins folder:

script/plugin install git://github.com/dekart/furwall.git

Then you should create a migration that creates table for Permission model.
Please check db/migrations folder for migration example.

Basic Usage

After the table is created you should create your permission rules and use it
in your controllers. For example, you want to check user permissions to edit
Product. You should add permission check in your controller:

class ProductsController < ApplicationController def edit @product = Product.find(params[:id]) check_object_permissions!(@product) end end

If current user (returned by current_user method) has permission for @product –
it will simply pass, otherwise it will raise Furwall::PermissionDenied exception.

Let’s create your first permission rule:

Permission.create( :controllable => Prodict.first, :action => “edit”, :rule => “admin | product_manager” )

This rule allows admin and product manager to edit first product. Imagine that
we want to allow admin to edit all products. This rule will help:

Permission.create( :controllable_type => “Product”, :action => “edit”, :rule => “admin” )

Now let’s define Car model which is accestor of Product model (using STI):

class Car < Product end

If we don’t specify any rules for Car model it will inherit rules from Product
model. But if we want – no problem:

Permission.create( :controllable_type => “Car”, :action => “edit”, :rule => “admin | car_manager” )

State Check

Let’s imagine that we want to permit product manager to edit product only if
they are not published yet. Let’s define Product state check:

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base def pending?
  1. Logic that returns true or false
    end
    end

Then we can specify access rules as follows:

Permission.create( :controllable_type => “Product”, :action => “edit”, :rule => “admin | (product_manager & :pending)” )

Furwall will automatically check result of pending? method. If the product is
not published yet it will permit product manager to edit product, otherwise only
admin will be able to edit it.

Relation Check

Another option is to check user role in object context. Let’s assume that our
Product model has owner. Let’s create a method that checks if the user is owner
of the product:

class Production < ActiveRecord::Base def is_owner?(user)
  1. Logic that returns true or false
    end
    end

In this case we can create permission as follows:

Permission.create( :controllable_type => “Product”, :action => “edit”, :rule => “admin | .owner” )

Furwall will check result of is_owner? method. If the method returns true -
it will pass.

Permission References

Let’s take our magic wand and try to create advanced permission rules. For
example we want to permit product edition only for category moderator. We
can specify permission reference for the Product model:

class Category < ActiveRecord::Base has_many :products def is_moderator?(user)
  1. Logick that returns true or false
    end
    end
class Product < ActiveRecord::Base belongs_to :category permission_reference :category end

Now we can use it in our rules:

Permission.create( :controllable_type => “Product”, :action => “edit”, :rule => “admin | category.moderator” )

Furwall will check is_moderator? for product’s category reference. If the method
returns true – it will pass.

Permission Context

By default Furwall uses current_user method to retreive user for permission
check. You can change this behavior by specifying required user manually:

class ProductsController < ApplicationController def edit @product = Product.find(params[:id]) check_object_permissions!(@product, :user => User.first) end end

You can use custom action name for permission taht can be different from
controller action name. For example you can use same action name for both edit and
update methods:

class ProductsController < ApplicationController def edit @product = Product.find(params[:id]) check_object_permissions!(@product) # Uses :edit by default end def update @product = Product.find(params[:id]) check_object_permissions!(@product, :edit) # Uses :update by default
  1. Update logic goes here
    end
    end

Permissions in Views

You can check object permissions in your views:

<% if object_permit?(@product, :manage) %> Management permitted <% else %> Management not permitted <% end %>

Or you can restrict some blocks to only permitted users:

<% object_restrict_to(@product, :manage) %> This block is only for managers <% end %>

Patches & Suggestion

If you have any ideas about extending Furwall – feel free to fork it at Github:

http://github.com/dekart/furwall/tree/master

You can also provide bug reports at Lighthouse:

http://furwall.lighthouseapp.com

Bug fixes, patches, and additional specs are greately appreciated.

Copyright © 2008 Alexey Dmitriev

Contact Email: rene.dekart@gmail.com