Minimalistic unit testing framework for Mac OS X, iOS and GNUstep
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README.md

UnitKit

Maintainer : Quentin Mathe quentin.mathe@gmail.com Authors : James Duncan Davidson, Nicolas Roard, Quentin Mathe, David Chisnall, Yen-Ju Chen, Christopher Armstrong, Eric Wasylishen License : Apache License 2.0 (see LICENSE document) Version : 1.5

Build Status

UnitKit is a minimalistic unit testing framework that supports Mac OS X, iOS and GNUstep.

The framework is less than 2000 loc, and built around two classes UKRunner and UKTestHandler, plus some test macros, and an empty protocol UKTest to mark test classes.

The UnitKit core features are:

  • Test assertion macros
    • easy to write and read
    • without useless arguments
    • not too many ones
    • extensible (implement a UKTestHandler subclass or category)
  • No test case class, just adopt UKTest protocol
  • No special methods -setUp and -tearDown, just implement -init and and -dealloc
  • Class test methods in addition to instance ones
  • Run loop integration for asynchronous testing
  • Uncaught exception reporting
  • Delegate methods to signal a test suite will start or just ended
  • Tested method and class choice based on a regex
  • Verbose and quiet ouput
  • Optional ukrun tool to run test suites packaged in test bundles
  • Xcode test suite templates

To know more about UnitKit: http://www.etoile-project.org/dev/UnitKit

Note: This UnitKit version is a fork of the original UnitKit written by James Duncan Davidson. The original version is not available anymore, and its development has been halted for many years. The initial project web site unitkit.org is also no longer available.

Build and Install

Read INSTALL.Cocoa.md and INSTALL.GNUstep.md documents.

Mac OS X support

Both Cocoa and Xcode support are actively maintained, and used by several Etoile modules that can be built on Mac OS X.

How to use UnitKit with Mac OS X

You need to compile your sources as a bundle. If you have installed UnitKit as explained in INSTALL.Cocoa.md, with File -> New -> Target... Xcode should let you create a test bundle target/scheme. In the Xcode Template panel, choose UnitKit Testing Bundle available in the category OS X -> Other.

For running the test suite, click Run in the toolbar. The scheme must have the tool set to 'ukrun' in the Run section, and the arguments to:

  • -q
  • $TARGET_BUILD_DIR/.bundle

must be the test suite target/scheme name. You cannot use $TARGET_BUILD_DIR/$WRAPPER_NAME, because build settings variable are evaluated based on 'ukrun' and not based on the test suite build settings ('ukrun' is set as the executable in the Run section of the test suite scheme).

If the UnitKit Testing Bundle template is used, this is is normally set up transparently. However it can be useful to check the scheme is correctly set up if the test suite doesn't run.

Inside this bundle, compile the test classes and any additional code needed.

For testing a framework or library, the test bundle can just link the tested product.

Note: You can check TestUnitKit target and scheme to understand how to create a test bundle manually (without using the UnitKit Testing Bundle template).

How to use UnitKit with iOS

You need to compile your sources as an iOS application, since iOS doesn't let you run tools or create bundles.

With File -> New -> Target... Xcode should let you create an application target/scheme. In the Xcode Template panel, choose Empty Application available in the category iOS -> Application.

For the new target, you should now just keep Info.plist, all the other files created by Xcode can be removed (e.g. main.m, AppDelegate.h, AppDelegate.m, Prefix.h, localization files and the directory that corresponds to the target on disk).

Finally copy UnitKit/Source/iOSCompatibility/main.m in your project, and this file to the new target. Based on the UnitKit API, main.m can be customized to control the tested classes, the verbosity etc.

For running the test suite, click Run in the toolbar.

Inside this test application, compile the test classes and any additional code needed.

For testing a framework or library, the application can just link the tested product.

Note: You can check TestUnitKit (iOS) target and scheme to understand how to create a iOS test application manually.

How to use UnitKit with GNUstep Make

You need to compile your sources as a bundle. Here is a GNUmakefile example:

include $(GNUSTEP_MAKEFILES)/common.make

BUNDLE_NAME = Test
Test_OBJC_FILES = # your sources and test classes...
Test_OBJC_LIBS = -lUnitKit # you can link a tested library or framework

include $(GNUSTEP_MAKEFILES)/bundle.make

Then, just type:

ukrun Test.bundle

And you should have the list of the tests and their status. You can omit the 'Test.bundle' argument, if you do so 'ukrun' will try to run any bundles (with .bundle extension) located in the current directory.