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proposal: cmd/go: secure releases with transparency log #25530

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FiloSottile opened this issue May 23, 2018 · 52 comments

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commented May 23, 2018

[The text of this proposal is outdated. Find the whole proposal here.]

This is a proposal for a long-term plan to provide transparency logs to verify the authenticity of Go releases. It's not something we are ready to implement anytime soon.

Transparency logs are append only Merkle trees which are easy to audit, and provide efficient proofs of inclusion. They are used for Certificate Transparency and are starting to be used for binary transparency.

They are a good fit for securing releases:

  • The log will fetch releases directly from the source, punting the spam issue on GitHub (etc.) or domain registries (as we can ban accounts/domains).
  • Clients will ask the log(s) for the release hash, and for proof that it was included in the append-only log. Module authors can audit the logs for their own projects, or get notified about new versions of it.
  • An hypothetical go release tool can trigger submission of the version to the log, and then verify that its hash matches what the developer has on disk. This is especially nice as it keeps the host (i.e. GitHub) honest.
  • Logs can also gossip with each other to make sure that a different version has not been observed before. (This is important so that two logs don't end up disagreeing on a version hash when the author changes the tag in between two log submissions.) go release can also check with logs that a version does not exist yet before tagging it.
  • Logs can be audited by third parties by comparing their entries to the packages fetched from git (maybe using the GitHub API to learn about new releases as soon as they are pushed) or by clients by comparing their global (#24117) or observed modverify files.
  • Proxies can be integrated with this system so that they will verify packages they are proxying. We can then support the concept of a trusted proxy, so that for example internal company systems will connect only to the proxy and not to the external logs.

The security of such a system is superior to what is provided by modverify, which is effectively pinning to the view of the developer adding the dependency. Transparency logs pin to the first time the version was globally observed, and with the go release workflow they pin directly to the view of the developer who created the dependency.

We can probably build the implementation on top of Trillian, a transparency log (and map) implementation which has the explicit concept of "personalities" for the custom use-case logic. (CT is a Trillian personality.)

Ideally, these logs would be operated by multiple players in the community, and a client could choose to trust or submit to any number of them.

We can build the tooling outside the go tool as a way to check/generate modverify entries to experiment until we feel comfortable with it.

@gopherbot gopherbot added this to the vgo milestone May 23, 2018

@rsc rsc modified the milestones: vgo, vgo2 Jun 6, 2018

@rsc rsc modified the milestones: vgo2, Go1.12 Jul 12, 2018

@rsc rsc changed the title x/vgo: secure releases with transparency logs cmd/go: secure releases with transparency logs Jul 12, 2018

@rsc rsc added the modules label Jul 12, 2018

@bcmills bcmills modified the milestones: Go1.12, Unplanned Nov 15, 2018

@bcmills bcmills changed the title cmd/go: secure releases with transparency logs proposal: cmd/go: secure releases with transparency logs Jan 18, 2019

@gopherbot gopherbot added the Proposal label Jan 18, 2019

@bcmills bcmills added NeedsDecision and removed Proposal labels Jan 18, 2019

@bcmills bcmills modified the milestones: Unplanned, Go1.13 Jan 18, 2019

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commented Feb 27, 2019

Not sure what the difference is between this issue and #24117.

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commented Feb 27, 2019

#24117 is about a system-wide go.sum (which might be made superfluous by this).

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commented Mar 4, 2019

Got it. I retitled #24117 to avoid the confusion.

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commented Mar 4, 2019

Change https://golang.org/cl/165018 mentions this issue: design: add 25530-notary.md

gopherbot pushed a commit to golang/proposal that referenced this issue Mar 4, 2019

design: add 25530-notary.md
See https://golang.org/design/25530-notary.

For golang/go#25530.

Change-Id: I1b4add8fe1c2f6911e925bafab99eb7418aa67b4
Reviewed-on: https://go-review.googlesource.com/c/proposal/+/165018
Run-TryBot: Russ Cox <rsc@golang.org>
Reviewed-by: Russ Cox <rsc@golang.org>
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commented Mar 4, 2019

Published formal proposal: https://golang.org/design/25530-notary.

@rsc rsc modified the milestones: Go1.13, Proposal Mar 4, 2019

@rsc rsc changed the title proposal: cmd/go: secure releases with transparency logs proposal: cmd/go: secure releases with transparency log Mar 4, 2019

@rsc rsc removed the GoCommand label Mar 4, 2019

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commented Mar 7, 2019

@thepudds, yes, once there is a 'go release' we definitely want it to validate that the copy the notary sees matches the local copy, and that would imply telling the notary about the path. And yes, 'go notify module' is only once per path so the vast majority of users would never need to run it - someone almost certainly already has.

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commented Mar 7, 2019

Fair enough regarding turning verification on by default

I think me and @marwan-at-work (correct me if I'm wrong, Marwan) are both trying to prevent build breakages out of the box (i.e. turning off noverify for private modules), but approaching it from slightly different ways. And I've been talking a lot about making it easier in the UX to use other notaries (i.e. for folks who can't access golang.org or who want to use other notaries).

In the former, I agree with @marwan-at-work's conditions, and ideas to set noverify modules in the go.mod. To help with the latter, the only thing I'd add to the options in the go.mod is making it easier to set or point to the public key of the notary you want to talk to. Also in the latter case, I don't think sending anything up to notary.golang.org is an option in the cases we need to be looking at for the latter, so I'm not sure if that solves anything.

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commented Mar 7, 2019

I also have concerns over adding a go mod notify because essentially that requires that someone who releases a new version module path needs to add something to their CI/CD systems (or do it manually) to run go mod notify, right? That would be a big diversion from the current workflow for all module authors, which is tag it and you're done. That would disrupt another extremely common workflow that affects lots of people (even if it isn't covered under the compatibility guarantee)

edit: s/version/path

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commented Mar 8, 2019

@arschles, I'm pretty reluctant to add configuration variables to either go.mod or go.sum. Your notary/proxy configuration is a local decision, not one that should be exposed to all clients of your module. Cloning someone's repo and cd'ing into it probably shouldn't default you into a whole separate proxy/notary/etc. And 'git checkout <commit from one year ago>' most probably should not roll you back to last year's servers either. (Imagine how badly git bisect would fail!)

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commented Mar 8, 2019

@arschles, I share your concern about the extra step in go notify. That's why it's not in the proposal. But if using the SHA256 hash makes people sufficiently more comfortable with the notary, it might (or might not) be the right tradeoff. That said, I don't see why a CI/CD system would need to run go mod notify, nor would most users.

First, my assumption about CI/CD usage is that you only push to that system once you've at least built the code locally. If you've built the code locally, the go command updated go.mod and go.sum to include any newly-added dependencies. Any entries in go.sum are always accepted as correct. A complete go.sum therefore implies no notary access at all.

Second, we added the -mod=readonly flag exactly for CI/CD systems, so that even if go.mod were not up to date they would not try to update it. I don't know whether -mod=readonly also applies to go.sum today, but it should, and if not we'll fix that (#30667). If a CI/CD system is using -mod=readonly, then, an incomplete go.sum will trigger a local failure, again no notary access at all.

It's true that during local development, some developer somewhere in the ecosystem will have to run go mod notify once for each public module path. If we roll it into go release, the author can do it easily. If not, the first user will. Most users will never need to do this. In fact, if you try to use a public module and find that you need to run go mod notify, that's a very strong signal that literally no one else has ever used that module as a dependency, and you might rethink blazing that trail. :-)

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commented Mar 8, 2019

More generally, any answer we reach for the default behavior is going to be some compromise between:

  • defending against server and network compromises (do nothing),
  • bandwidth (download the entire notary database and look for what you need),
  • and privacy (be more selective in what is downloaded).

It's not going to be possible to satisfy everyone, with any decision. Ultimately the goal of this discussion is to try to find a default behavior that is as acceptable as possible for as many people as possible. I really appreciate everyone engaging respectfully and helpfully as we work through this.

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commented Mar 8, 2019

I've updated the design doc, expanding the Security and Privacy sections quite a bit to capture the discussions to this point.

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commented Mar 8, 2019

FYI, I think this is the recent diff on the proposal document and the corresponding CL, if interested.

I agree putting something like an actual proxy server into a go.mod would not be desirable, and I am not in love with putting a large amount of additional configuration into go.mod, but I wonder if some form of user intent regarding public vs. nonpublic might make sense in go.mod so that it could be checked in to VCS, which could then drive sanity checking of the other related configuration settings or environment variables by things like go get, go release, etc.? I don't know that it would ultimately make sense to do that, but if that was to be pursued, would it be just two cases that really matter regarding user intent (e.g., some type of public vs. nonpublic in go.mod)? Of course, there would be follow-on thinking needed about defaults, dealing with Go 1.11/1.12 go.mod files, how/when it is set or checked, etc., but perhaps it might be reasonable to have effectively one bit encoded somehow in go.mod regarding intent.

Separately, regarding sending the hash(modulepath)@version, it seems like a nice win, and while it might be a modest increase in complexity in one area, it might be a net reduction in overall complexity (e.g., if it ends up driving down complexity in some of the related questions around other settings, or by reducing the complexity or penalty of having a "wrong" default for a subset of users). The biggest downside seems to be the potential for complexity around getting the hash into the notary. It would not be great if the end result was "you need to read the documentation to understand when, how, and why to invoke go notify <module>... but it certainly at least "feels" like people could be successfully guided by the go tool almost 100% of the time via some combination of default behavior, informative messages suggesting likely resolution, automatic validation, flags, etc. as part of the otherwise natural module workflow (e.g., for go get, go release, or perhaps even go init), in addition to the indexing service doing it automatically for the large majority of repos on major public code hosting sites.

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commented Mar 13, 2019

@rsc the issues that config variables in the go.mod sound like a good reason to leave them out, I agree.

Since GH issues don't have threading, I've submitted two posts in golang-dev to capture two of the earlier questions I've asked in here. I'll focus this just on the SHA256 / go mod notify idea. I've tried to gather some related points made in previous posts and I'll try to address them here. I apologize in advance if I missed something important. I certainly don't intend to cherry pick points or build strawmen here.

My assumption about CI/CD usage is that you only push to that system once you've at least built the code locally.

+1, this is mine too. As you said, that would mean that go mod notify was run somewhere for all of your dependencies, but it would still be up to a developer to run go mod notify on their own if they're releasing a new module path of their own. That's the part that concerns me because it would be the first time that module authors would not be able to git tag and be "done" with releasing their new module path.

Even though that's definitely not a good practice, it happens a lot when folks are prototyping something new or don't have any tests at all. I'm guilty of the latter, on multiple counts 😁

That's a very strong signal that literally no one else has ever used that module as a dependency, and you might rethink blazing that trail. :-)

I'd say so too 😄. However, this means that either the author has to run go mod notify (see above) or most new packages don't get used. In fact I'd guess that the only new modules that get adopted would be from "trusted" (or "famous") authors

I've updated the design doc, expanding the Security and Privacy sections quite a bit to capture the discussions to this point.

Thank you 😄

I wonder if some form of user intent regarding public vs. nonpublic might make sense in go.mod

@thepudds can you help me understand how the intent would be acted upon by the go tool? I'm trying to get a sense of how the sanity checks differ from skipping verification

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commented Mar 14, 2019

Just as a heads up, I am going to be away from work (including GitHub!) starting pretty soon and continuing for the next two weeks, ramping back up gradually the week of April 1. I'll catch up on any discussion here and on golang-dev when I return. Thanks for the excellent conversation so far.

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commented May 1, 2019

Hi there. I'm late to the party and maybe from left field, but I am part of an OWASP project that is trying to raise the security bar for package management systems across the development ecosystem.

As such, we took quick interest in the work happening here once we became aware of it and wanted to support and encourage further work as well. We recognize that golang is a little different than say, npm and rubygems where we have seen significant security issues emerge. Still, we think that there is more than can be done.

Please let me know if you would rather see separate issues raised, or would like to have a discussion in some other forum (eg. a list), or whatever is most constructive from your collective perspective.

There are a number of good things already in the proposal, obviously. Kudos for that.

As a developer, I still have some concerns:

  1. A library I am using could have a known security issue and I would never find out about it. It would be great to see something like go audit similar to npm audit. As a start, this could just look up known issues for currently used known versions.
  2. A developer contributing to a library I use could have their password guessed and a new version of the library released with a back door. Based on the sum approach described here, I may know that the module changed but I would never know for sure by who.
  • We would suggest some indication of whether the authentication to the release is strong. In practice it seems like this defers to GitHub authentication. If I understand correctly though, that is optional and may not require a strong password or MFA.
  • Ideally, we would like to see the packages signed by the authors. We know that is a high bar that most ecosystems have not been able to effectively implement but that would be stronger than a checksum.
  • I'm not 100% clear on the internals to know if the go sum would have enough info (eg. hash of commit for each release) to be able to show what actually changed but that would be important to have too. In other words, the version and checksum needs to also match to some fixed source code that we can go see (and audit).
  1. It seems like because the Go ecosystem is decentralized, there may not be one place to go to report security issues. I see the disclosure process for the main Go project, and am on the announce list now but it is not clear how "other ecosystem issues" will be handled. That may be intentional at this point but it poses a risk to me as a developer.

There is probably more here but this seems like a good start for the conversation.

As always, I could be missing something - or many things - so hopefully this can come across as constructive input. Your work here, on ecosystem level pieces, is so critical to building a more secure overall software environment and there are a bunch of people from our community who would likely be willing to talk or even help with pieces of this. Thanks!

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commented May 1, 2019

Hi @mkonda, other people might have more specific comments, but I wanted to at least briefly share some pointers that might be of interest to you.

Regarding your points 1. and 3., see for example #24031, and especially #24031 (comment). As far as I understand it, that would enable declaring insecure versions of a module after a release has been published, and would do so without relying on a centralized authority. (edit: as you'll notice if you click on that link, that is an open proposal. That said, I've seen the core Go team state it is important to address that use case. Another alternative discussed prior to that was expanding godoc.org to enable reporting on pair-wise incompatibilities and security issues).

Regarding your point 2., two related items that might be of interest to you:

  • "Our Software Dependency Problem" ("Download and run code from strangers on the internet. What could go wrong?")

  • "Go Modules in 2019", which includes "Finally, we mentioned earlier that the module index will make it easier to build sites like godoc.org. Part of our work in 2019 will be a major revamp of godoc.org to make it more useful for developers who need to discover available modules and then decide whether to rely on a given module or not.".

Together, those two references I think describe a desire to provide services to make it easier for people within the ecosystem to evaluate the quality of a dependency. Perhaps evaluating something like whether or not a dependency has MFA set up for GitHub authentication could be a piece of that.

Regarding:

I'm not 100% clear on the internals to know if the go sum would have enough info (eg. hash of commit for each release) to be able to show what actually changed but that would be important to have too.

There is a brief description in the documentation:
https://golang.org/cmd/go/#hdr-Module_downloading_and_verification

The go command maintains, in the main module's root directory alongside go.mod, a file named go.sum containing the expected cryptographic checksums of the content of specific module versions. Each time a dependency is used, its checksum is added to go.sum if missing or else required to match the existing entry in go.sum.

The go command maintains a cache of downloaded packages and computes and records the cryptographic checksum of each package at download time.

I believe it is a SHA256.

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commented May 1, 2019

Hi @mkonda, 1 and 3 are indeed open issues. They are thankfully orthogonal to what the checksum database solves, so we can tackle them separately. (Making sure the content is authentic, vs making sure it's "secure".)

On 2, I don't really believe we can get widespread adoption of authentication beyond the code host. Even if we made every author sign their releases (which is unrealistic for a number of reasons), they will most likely just sign what's in their repository, effectively delegating that trust.

It is important though that we prevent proxies and attackers from publishing versions unbeknownst to the author, and the checksum database log helps greatly with that: any third-party auditor can offer a service to notify owners of new releases in their repositories, and I hope we will see many kinds of that service.

That, combined with go release #26420 checking the checksum database, ensures that users only see releases that match what was on the developer machine. I don't think we can do any better than that.

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commented May 2, 2019

I realize I am late to complain, but while I understand the need for veryfing the integrity of go modules, what this proposal amounts to is using a single central server by default, creating a single point of failure.

Furthermore, if GOPROXY and GOSUMDB are set by default to central Google servers, then not only people in countries such as China, but people al over the world behind firewalls, such as restrictive corporate firewalls, will experience difficulties in using Go. All these people will be forced to use a custom go proxy with support for sumdb. It doesn't make for a great user experience that the first thing a Go users should do when they start using the language is that they have to configure a proxy and a sum DB. See #31755 for a related discussion.

In I'd like to ask if there no other way that checking the module checksums could be more decentralized, and give a better user experience for firewalled users?

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commented May 2, 2019

The design goal is to make sure everyone agrees on the same contents for the same version, so a degree of centralization is necessary. The point of the transparency log is to ensure that the log is not a single point of failure: compromising it is not enough because it will lead to detection by the auditors.

The checksum db is also designed to allow for decentralized proxies. As you mentioned, anyone that can reach any untrusted proxy can successfully use the sumdb. (This also makes the sumdb not a single point of failure for read availability.)

If you want to discuss the defaults, please use #31755. The sumdb design can support any conclusion that that issue comes to.

(As an example, consider a "blockchain", that you might think of as more decentralized. You still have to talk to nodes somehow. If you have a way to talk to a node, you can also speak the proxy protocol with them as-is, and reach the sumdb through that.)

harmony-ek added a commit to harmony-ek/harmony that referenced this issue May 14, 2019

Add go.sum back
To quote the “Releasing Modules (All Version)” section of the Go Modules
wiki page [1]:

    Ensure your go.sum file is committed along with your go.mod file.
    See FAQ below [2] for more details and rationale.

And the “Should I commit my 'go.sum' file as well as my 'go.mod' file?”
section from the same page [2]:

    Typically your module's go.sum file should be committed along with your
    go.mod file.

      - go.sum contains the expected cryptographic checksums of the
        content of specific module versions.

      - If someone clones your repository and downloads your
        dependencies using the go command, they will receive an error if
        there is any mismatch between their downloaded copies of your
        dependencies and the corresponding entries in your go.sum.

      - In addition, go mod verify checks that the on-disk cached copies
        of module downloads still match the entries in go.sum.

      - Note that go.sum is not a lock file as used in some alternative
        dependency management systems. (go.mod provides enough
        information for reproducible builds).

      - See very brief rationale here [3] from Filippo Valsorda on why
        you should check in your go.sum. See the "Module downloading and
        verification" [4] section of the tip documentation for more
        details.  See possible future extensions being discussed for
        example in golang/go#24117 and golang/go#25530.”

[1] https://github.com/golang/go/wiki/Modules#releasing-modules-all-versions
[2] https://github.com/golang/go/wiki/Modules#should-i-commit-my-gosum-file-as-well-as-my-gomod-file
[3] https://twitter.com/FiloSottile/status/1029404663358087173
[4] https://tip.golang.org/cmd/go/#hdr-Module_downloading_and_verification
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commented May 21, 2019

I'm going to send a CL that enables both the Go checksum database and the Go module mirror by default in module mode.

There remain issues to resolve with this proposal, so we cannot turn the checksum database on for all users. However, now that we are not enabling modules for all users, it seems reasonable to enable the checksum database for module users, so that we can more precisely understand the exact problems and develop solutions. People who aren't ready to move to modules yet will not be affected by enabling the checksum database, and modules users having particular trouble with the checksum database can turn it off for the specific modules (go env -w GONOSUMDB=mysite.com/*) or entirely (go env -w GOSUMDB=off), but I encourage them to file specific issues as well, so that we can address them.

If there are any show-stopper issues that we can't address before Go 1.13 is released, we will back out the change. But we need to understand better what the issues are, especially the as-yet-unknown ones.

Thanks.

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commented May 21, 2019

Change https://golang.org/cl/178179 mentions this issue: cmd/go: default to GOPROXY=https://proxy.golang.org and GOSUMDB=sum.golang.org

gopherbot pushed a commit that referenced this issue May 23, 2019

cmd/go: default to GOPROXY=https://proxy.golang.org and GOSUMDB=sum.g…
…olang.org

This CL changes the default module download and module verification mechanisms
to use the Go module mirror and Go checksum database run by Google.
See https://proxy.golang.org/privacy for the services' privacy policy.
(Today, that URL is a redirect to Google's standard privacy policy,
which covers these services as well. If we publish a more specific
privacy policy just for these services, that URL will be updated to
display or redirect to it.)

See 'go help modules' and 'go help modules-auth' for details (added in this CL).

To disable the mirror and checksum database for non-public modules:

	go env -w GONOPROXY=*.private.net,your.com/*
	go env -w GONOSUMDB=*.private.net,your.com/*

(If you are using a private module proxy then you'd only do the second.)

If you run into problems with the behavior of the go command when using
the Go module mirror or the Go checksum database, please file issues at
https://golang.org/issue/new, so that we can address them for the
Go 1.13 release.

For #25530.

This CL also documents GONOPROXY.
Fixes #32056.

Change-Id: I2fde82e071742272b0842efd9580df1a56947fec
Reviewed-on: https://go-review.googlesource.com/c/go/+/178179
Run-TryBot: Russ Cox <rsc@golang.org>
TryBot-Result: Gobot Gobot <gobot@golang.org>
Reviewed-by: Bryan C. Mills <bcmills@google.com>
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commented May 31, 2019

Editorial comments about the document...

The use of a transparent log for module hashes aligns with a broader trend of using transparent logs
to enable detection of misbehavior by partially trusted systems, what the Trillian team calls
“General Transparency.”

This is the first mention of Trillian in the doc (despite the linked papers). Maybe the term

needs elaboration or a link (https://github.com/google/trillian)

There are two main privacy concerns: exposing the text of private modules paths to the database, and
exposing usage information for public modules to the databas.

DATABAS => DATABASE 

The complete solution for not exposing either private module path text or public module usage
information is to us a proxy or a bulk download.

US => USE

Privacy in CI/CD Systems

Acronym is never defined in document (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CI/CD)
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commented May 31, 2019

I'm (maybe stupidly) unable to grasp one of the core design issues in this design. The services claimed as valuable and necessary are about doing a lookup to validate a pending action ("about to do this and want to know data to use in verification") or about the past-tense version of the same.

It seems important to me that In both cases the client (go get, et al) start by knowing something that may be a secret (the import path and version number) which is the key to obtain the not-a-secret value of the checksum. Because of privacy, non-public code, likely misconfiguration, etc., it seems that the sometimes secret info is the last thing you'd want to use as the public key.

I read the part about possibly using "Private Module SHA256s" but that seemed to miss the point by focusing on the reverse mapping table and first-time publication issues. Here is what I don't understand--why does the database ever need the "clear text" import path and version number? Why must it ever be sent anywhere? It is only useful in that form (I think) to go get on the client side.

Instead, have go get et al create a hashed/encrypted by path/version token, locally, that has strong one-way attributes and use that as the query key, store that in databases, etc. In such a world the module checksum responses are just as easy to supply, are totally "transparent" on the data to be secured side (the checksum) and totally opaque on the other (machine names, import paths, versions, timestamps, traffic analysis, etc.) It sidesteps completely the issue of private data...which will be harmlessly useless to all.

What have I overlooked here?

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commented Jun 1, 2019

Following up...because I forgot that this is not "lunch in Charlie's" and it is my duty to explain all the implications:

Yes, my proposal is about an opaque 256-bit one-way cryptographic hash of the query string (the go get info: path+version, perhaps hashed atop the hash of the module source in the Merkle-Damgard sense.)...

...and a transparent-but-otherwise meaningless 256-bit one-way cryptographic hash of the module source -- the existing answer to database queries.

This leads to an exactly 512-bit per record database that would be remarkably simple to maintain and serve, with any complexity being the existing dance around security-through-federation. (Which is nice!)

The result is a public database with properties beyond "encryption at rest" -- not one byte of this database tells you anything that can be used from the database end to know about module paths, machine/url paths, developer identity, etc. It is, in this way, a giant mystery and thus provably safe in any privacy sense no matter how it is configured or maintained, nothing can leak because nothing is there to leak.

Yet, when used the other way, it is fully supportive. go get or other tools want to know about an importable module: they internalize the request path+version, and query with that key. They get back the hash value for the module just as now.

What is lost, you might presume, is the joy of voyeuristically looking at database keys to build a network map of the Land of Go, and G-tools leveraging that map to monitor, report, and assist in various open-ended activities. Nothing in the rationale seems to argue for this map and its conceptual buildability from query strings shows the leaky nature of the present design. If it is not needed, then maybe it is not wanted.

However (this is the new part that I thought would be clear without mention but now I'm thinking that thinking is not in the spirit of distributed discussions) it happens to be true that a better map of the Land of Go is buildable in my opaque-key design. What is needed is a tool or company that knows how to crawl the public web looking for openly shared .go,.mod,... files and then download the import path and version strings from those. These can easily be interned to opaque keys and requests made to the database. When a key is present, then so is the version's hash. all of this--the three tuple of provably-shared-source path&version, the resulting key, and the stored hash--are then united for building the Land of Go tooling.

This way, the map if desired, is never built from private code because that code is not shared on the web. So provenance is provable. Security is implicit. Misconfiguration can't hurt. That's what I meant.

@FiloSottile

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commented Jun 1, 2019

The reason module names need to be available in plaintext in the database is for auditing purposes. A transparent log is only useful if it is scrutinized and held accountable, and to perform a number of checks the auditors need to know what the module names are.

An example: we will want a notification service that can email me for any new module like github.com/FiloSottile/..., so I get to know if fake modules are being published.

Also, the search space is not that wide so hashes can be reversed in most cases, which is why the private lookup proposal uses hash prefixes, to lean on the equivalent of k-anonymity.

(Thanks for the edits, I'll make a PR next week, but feel free to go ahead and make one in the meantime if you'd like.)

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